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Domestic Violence

Volume 507: debated on Monday 8 March 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Islwyn of 12 January 2010, Official Report, column 849W, on domestic violence, what timetable has been set for (a) funding for national helplines, multi-agency risk assessment conferences, independent domestic violence advisers and other domestic violence related services (b) the development of an online directory of violence against women and girls services; and when those services will be operational. (320117)

As soon as the formal budget delegation has been received we will be able to make announcements in relation to funding for national helplines, MARACs and IDVAs. The announcement will be made by the end of March at the latest.

We are still working with other Government Departments and the sector to scope out the most effective model for the online directory of services and will set out a timetable for delivery when we have determined what the model should be.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Islwyn of 12 January 2010, Official Report, column 849W, on domestic violence, whether his Department uses methods other than the British Crime Survey to gather information about domestic violence. (320139)

The Home Office collects the following information about domestic violence:

Total number of reported domestic violence incidents (by police force area)

Number of incidents of reported domestic violence that involved victims of a reported domestic violence incident in the previous 12 months (by police force area)

Information from Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARAC) which includes the number of cases and repeat rate of victimisation (from each MARAC)

Number of homicides which gives figures by relationship between victim and suspect.

Ad-hoc social research projects are commissioned by the Home Office from time-to-time to inform the development and assessment of policy and practice on domestic violence. Typically these employ a mix of methods and often include qualitative interviews with victims and practitioners as well as the analysis of administrative data. Copies of Home Office social research reports can be found online at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/index.html