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Written Answers

Volume 507: debated on Tuesday 9 March 2010

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 9 March 2010

Transport

Aviation: Security

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what work his Department is undertaking to test systems for screening liquids in airports. (321188)

The Department for Transport has worked with European partners to establish agreed criteria for the testing of liquids screening systems, and is currently working with manufacturers to share data and consider opportunities for operational trials.

Bus Services: Concessions

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much his Department had spent on concessionary bus travel for pensioners in (a) Gloucestershire and (b) Stroud constituency on the latest date for which figures are available. (321039)

From April 2008, the Department for Transport has provided additional special grant funding to local authorities to cover the extra cost of providing the extension to the concession; which now guarantees free off-peak local bus travel across England to all eligible older and disabled residents:

(a) A total of £2,468,030 in 2008-09 and £2,526,238 in 2009-10 to all of the travel concession authorities (TCAs) in the county of Gloucestershire (which includes the unitary authority of South Gloucestershire council and Stroud district council);

(b) £237,197 in 2008-09 and £242,791 in 2009-10 to Stroud district council.

(c) Communities and Local Government (CLG) continues to provide the bulk of concessionary travel funding to local authorities through Formula Grant. Before 1 April 2008, funding for the statutory minimum bus concession was provided exclusively through the Formula Grant system.

The Department for Transport did however provide £31 million of grant to England in 2007-08 for the cost of producing and issuing the new England-wide bus passes to all those eligible, of which a total of £539,760 went to the TCAs of Gloucestershire; this includes Stroud’s allocation of £40,736.

Geographical Information Systems

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how much had been spent on the Galileo Project as at 1 March 2010; and what future funding is planned for the project. (320229)

The European Union (EU) and member states of the European Space Agency (ESA) have jointly funded the design and development of Galileo. The deployment and operational phase of the programme and all future costs are the responsibility of the EU.

€1.6 billion is the approximate committed spend on the design and development of the system. The majority of this has been funded by ESA who provided €1.46 billion, with the remainder funded by the EU. The UK share of the ESA contribution is €168.05 million, of which €161.1 million has been paid and the UK is committed to pay the remainder during 2010. UK contributions to ESA funds are for use in all its expenditure and are not calculated on an individual programme basis.

The current phase of the Galileo programme, the deployment and operation of the system (2010-13), will see the Galileo programme achieve full operational capability (FOC) and is currently being procured by ESA on behalf of the European Commission. The EU funding of Galileo between 2007 and 2013 has been capped at €3.4 billion.

The European Commission has estimated a further £6 billion will be needed for operation and maintenance costs from 2013-30. We expect the commission to bring forward, in spring of this year, proposals for how funding after 2013 might be sourced and what elements might come from private and public sources.

Government Car and Despatch Agency: Driving Offences

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many driving offences of each type have been committed by those who drive Ministers whilst on duty for the Government Car and Despatch Agency in each of the last three years. (320792)

Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how many staff his Department and its agencies have appointed who were later discovered to be illegal immigrants since 2005. (320449)

In each of the last five years, there have been no illegal immigrants found to be working as a Department for Transport employee.

In December 2008, one illegal immigrant was found to be working at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority as an employee of a contractor and was arrested on 10 December 2008. The contractor carried out all relevant checks prior to employment but was deceived by the forged documentation provided by this individual.

People employed to work in Government Departments and their agencies, either directly or through a contractor, are required to satisfy requirements on identity, nationality and immigration status prior to the offer of employment. On the one occasion within the last five years where compliance checks have found illegal immigrants working for Department for Transport contractors, the individual was kept in detention until his appearance in court on 12 January 2009.

Pilots: Licensing

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport how he will ensure the Civil Aviation Authority fulfils its commitment to maintain the UK Instruments Meteorological Conditions Pilots Licence rating. (321152)

I am not aware of any such commitment by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). The CAA, with the support of the Government, continues to work to influence the development of European requirements with the aim of helping the European Aviation Safety Agency meet its primary objective of ensuring a high uniform level of safety.

Roads: Snow and Ice

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport pursuant to the answer of 22 February 2010, Official Report, column 208W, on roads: snow and ice, how much the Highways Agency has spent on salt from overseas suppliers in each of the last 12 years. (320821)

The Highways Agency does not purchase salt directly, as this is the responsibility of their contracted service providers, as part of their requirement to deliver the winter service to keep the strategic network safe and open during severe winter weather. Consequently the Highways Agency has not purchased any overseas salt over the last 12 years, except, as a result of the national salt shortages experienced over the last two winter seasons, the Highways Agency has helped facilitate the importation of overseas salt to its service providers.

In 2008-09 season, the Highways Agency helped to import approximately 58,000 tonnes of salt, with a further 127,000 tonnes imported in the 2009-10 winter season. The price paid by the Highways Agency’s service providers varies between £50-£95 per tonne, depending on the salt supplier and haulage distances.

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport pursuant to the answer of 22 February 2010, Official Report, column 208W, on roads: snow and ice, how much salt was used on the strategic network in each of the last 12 years. (320823)

The Highways Agency is responsible for maintaining and operating the strategic trunk road and motorway network in England on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport. Actual delivery of the maintenance activities, including winter maintenance, is carried out by the agency’s contracted service providers.

As well as delivering precautionary salt treatments and snow ploughing during severe winter weather, the agency’s service providers are required to maintain sufficient salt stocks to treat their part of the network. These activities are paid for within lump sum payments and as such, information on individual elements such as salt volume used is not routinely collected and is not therefore readily available.

Following the end of the winter maintenance period, the Highways Agency will examine the levels of salt used during periods of adverse weather to determine best practice for future years.

Snow and Ice

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what estimate he has made of the aggregate cost to local authorities in (a) Northamptonshire and (b) England of repairs to local roads as a result of the recent cold weather. (321297)

The maintenance of local roads in England is a matter for each local highway authority. It is for each individual authority to assess which parts of its network are in need of repair and what standards should be applied, based upon their local knowledge.

It will be for local highway authorities to estimate the costs of repairing damage to their roads, including where they consider damage was caused by this winter.

Waterloo Station

To ask the Minister of State, Department for Transport what consideration he has given to the development of the former Eurostar platforms at Waterloo station for purposes other than for domestic passenger transport. (321399)

It has always been the Department for Transport's intention to bring the former Eurostar platforms at Waterloo back into use for domestic passenger services.

There are no plans for any other permanent use; although a series of theatrical performances are being staged during summer and autumn 2010 for the benefit of the Railway Children charity before the platforms are brought back into use for domestic services.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund: Nottinghamshire

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what information was provided by Nottinghamshire county council to his Department on its mineral plans and aggregates levy sustainability fund (ALSF) spending criteria in reaching devolved ALSF funding agreements with his Department. (321032)

Funding for a number of local authorities, including Nottinghamshire, that are most affected by aggregates extraction is provided direct from DEFRA via the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund (ALSF) on the basis that the authorities themselves will have discretion over where that funding is spent. There are no “devolved funding agreements” in the way suggested.

Information on the individual projects funded through the ALSF has been provided via the project database on the DEFRA website and includes project details, location, cost and match funding.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what percentage of minerals extracted from quarries in Nottinghamshire was from the parish of Misson in the latest period for which figures are available; and how much aggregates levy sustainability fund money has been spent in projects in Misson in the last 10 years. (321033)

Nottinghamshire county council has informed us that 6 per cent. of the aggregates extracted from quarries in Nottinghamshire came from the parish of Misson (from most recent (2008) figures from the East Midlands Aggregates Working Party).

Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund (ALSF) money has only been available for community theme (“Objective 5”) projects in Nottinghamshire since 2005-06. No ALSF Delivery Partner has recorded money being spent on projects in Misson on the DEFRA ALSF database.

Departmental Disabled Staff

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many and what proportion of staff in (a) his Department and (b) the executive agencies for which he is responsible are disabled; and what the average salary in (i) his Department and (ii) the executive agencies is of (A) full-time disabled staff, (B) full-time non-disabled staff, (C) part-time disabled staff and (D) part-time non-disabled staff. (317890)

The following table shows the number and percentage of staff in DEFRA and its agencies that have declared that they are disabled. The figures are as at 31 January 2010, except for RPA which are as at 31 March 2009.

Known disabled staff

Number

Percentage of declared

Percentage of all staff

DEFRA

128

19.1

5.1

AH

109

28.4

6.1

CEFAS

30

n/a

5.4

FERA

43

7.9

5.0

MFA

5

13.5

2.1

RPA

304

n/a

10.4

VLA

135

14.3

10.5

VMD

6

10.9

3.7

Key to table:

AH—Animal Health

CEFAS—Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Agriculture Research

FERA—Food and Environment Research Agency

MFA—Marine and Fisheries Agency

RPA—Rural Payments Agency

VLA—Veterinary Laboratories Agency

VMD—Veterinary Medicines Directorate.

The following table shows the average (mean) salaries of staff who have declared their disability status. Salaries do not include allowances or bonuses. A breakdown by grade grouping has been included for full-time staff in the table, except for CEFAS for whom the information is not available. No breakdown by grade has been provided for part-time staff as the numbers are too small to provide a meaningful comparison. The figures are as at 31 January 2010, except for RPA which are as at 31 March 2009.

Average salaries

£

Known disabled

Known non-disabled

DEFRA

Full-time

AA/AO

21,412

21,024

EO

26,731

26,302

HEO/SEO

33,984

34,269

G7 and above

60,554

53,962

All grades

36,174

38,358

Part-time

All grades

37,573

37,461

AH

Full-time

AA/AO

18,163

18,762

EO

25,142

24,523

HEO/SEO

30,857

30,632

G7 and above

53,036

50,360

All grades

24,529

28,863

Part-time

All grades

23,266

25,634

CEFAS

Full-time

All grades

19,950

25,400

Part-time

All grades

23,810

FERA

Full-time

AA/AO

16,476

16,803

EO

22,589

22,598

HEO/SEO

33,033

31,197

G7 and above

48,725

50,358

All grades

26,463

28,993

Part-time

All grades

26,193

26,296

MFA

Full-time

AA/AO

20,734

EO

25,819

24,893

HEO/SEO

30,486

35,962

G7 and above

51,625

All grades

28,619

33,680

Part-time

All grades

RPA

Full-time

AA/AO

18,185

17,773

EO

24,063

23,505

HEO/SEO

29,935

30,827

G7 and above

48,050

51,566

All grades

22,669

23,791

Part-time

All grades

20,870

22,128

VLA

Full-time

AA/AO

18,311

18,292

EO

24,057

24,078

HEO/SEO

34,608

35,972

G7 and above

53,191

54,204

All grades

24,776

26,727

Part-time

All grades

22,696

24,688

VMD

Full-time

AA/AO

21,051

21,502

EO

28,325

26,567

HEO/SEO

34,584

34,887

G7 and above

51,133

All grades

26,253

31,575

Part-time

All grades

34,515

29,693

Key to table:

AH—Animal Health

CEFAS—Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Agriculture Research

FERA—Food and Environment Research Agency

MFA—Marine and Fisheries Agency

RPA—Rural Payments Agency

VLA—Veterinary Laboratories Agency

VMD—Veterinary Medicines Directorate.

The figures on a grade by grade basis show that the differences between disabled and non-disabled staff are very small. In some grades the average salary of disabled staff is higher than that of non-disabled staff.

Although declaring disability status is not mandatory in DEFRA, we do encourage staff to declare their status to enable effective monitoring of HR policies.

Departmental Internet

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many designs for its website his Department has commissioned since 2005. (318652)

DEFRA has commissioned only one website redesign since its creation in 2001. This took place in 2009 and the new-look website was launched on 17 September 2009.

Dogs: Animal Welfare

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department is taking to increase the level of (a) detection and (b) enforcement action in respect of incidents of dog fighting. (320590)

Police are provided with powers under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 (as amended) for tackling dog fighting. Last year we provided Association of Chief Police Officers with funding to help police forces to train dedicated “dog legislation officers” who are familiar with the law on dangerous dogs.

However, it is for chief officers to decide how they target their resources to tackling or reducing crime in their particular force area.

Fish: Animal Feed

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) whether his Department has made an assessment of the effects on the economy of a ban on fishmeal in organic animal feeds; and if he will make a statement; (320843)

(2) what assessment has been made of the likelihood of increased fishmeal usage in organic animal feeds due to the reclassification of fish as a non-agricultural ingredient; and if he will make a statement;

(3) whether his Department has made an evaluation of the nutritional value of (a) organic animal feed and (b) animal feed containing fishmeal; and if he will make a statement.

We are aware that there is considerable concern in the industry about the practicality of complying with the requirement of EU rules for organic production that after 1 January 2012 organic pigs and poultry must be fed entirely on organically produced feed. We understand that providing a diet with a properly balanced protein content using wholly organically produced ingredients is a particular concern because of the difficulties with sourcing the correct protein ingredients for feed for organic pigs and poultry. DEFRA’s Advisory Committee on Organic Standards is investigating how this issue might be dealt with, including how the use of fishmeal might contribute to a solution to the problem.

Fisheries: Carbon Emissions

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much in carbon dioxide emissions was given off by the fishing fleet in (a) 2004, (b) 2005, (c) 2006, (d) 2007, (e) 2008 and (f) 2009; and if he will make a statement. (320842)

Figures are not available in relation to actual emissions from UK fishing vessels. However, an assessment of the total emissions from the fisheries sector for 2006 has been provided in DEFRA's Food 2030 strategy. This states that, as a total of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the UK food chain by sector, fisheries accounted for 1mt of the 160mt CO2e produced.

Available data over the period of 2000-08 indicate that for the UK fishing fleet there has been a reduction in engine capacity and fishing effort, as well as a move toward less fuel intensive fishing methods. This information is in the following tables.

Table 1: Development of UK registered fishing fleet, as at 1 January

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

10m and under

Number

5,730

5,591

5,527

5,589

5,439

5,404

5,169

Total Tonnage

18,779

18,910

19,018

19,156

18,961

18,895

18,295

Total engine power

277,610

278,475

279,697

284,443

280,079

280,824

274,170

Over 10m

Number

2,134

2,060

2,032

1,835

1,700

1,636

1,590

Total Tonnage

248,255

246,152

245,269

221,878

210,380

204,458

199,814

Total engine power

695,590

697,057

717,595

658,274

632,923

620,399

605,541

Total Fleet

Number

7,864

7,651

7,559

7,424

7,139

7,040

6,759

Total Tonnage

267,034

265,062

264,287

241,033

229,341

223,353

218,110

Total engine power

973,199

975,533

997,292

942,717

913,003

901,224

879,711

2007

2008

2009

Change over period (-ve is reduction)

% change over period (-ve is reduction)

Reduction through decommissioning and pelagic aggregations over period

Period due to decomm. Etc. (-ve is reduction)

10m and under

Number

5,208

5,243

5,081

-649

-11%

Total Tonnage

18,411

18,461

17,923

-856

-5%

Total engine power

277,803

281,893

274,598

-3012

-1%

Over 10m

Number

1,555

1,534

1,506

-628

-29%

-329

-15%

Total Tonnage

196,678

194,417

190,048

-58,208

-23%

-40,950

-16%

Total engine power

588,310

577,806

564,780

-130,809

-19%

-119,726

-17%

Total Fleet

Number

6,763

6,777

6,87

-1,277

-16%

-329

-4%

Total Tonnage

215,089

212,878

207,971

-59,063

-22%

-40,950

-15%

Total engine power

866,113

859,699

839,378

-133,821

-14%

-119,726

-12%

Table 2: Over 10m UK active fishing fleetdetails by data collection regulation segmentation: Segmentation based on fishing effort during the year in question

Heading

Fleet segment

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

% change over period(-ve is reduction)

Effort - KW Days at sea (million)

Mobile - beam trawl

20,552

21,725

18,425

17,650

17,581

16,106

13,208

11,996

8,030

-61

Mobile - demersal trawl/seine

83,921

78,713

70,474

62,743

54,774

49,184

46,050

44,634

45,861

-45

Mobile - dredge

7,235

6,916

6,782

6,446

6,852

7,068

6,405

6,412

5,851

-19

Mobile - pelagic

15,877

15,149

15,544

16,701

17,186

13,568

10,447

11,035

9,439

-41

Mobile - polyvalent

0,268

0,169

0,187

0,212

0,213

0,165

0,085

0,169

0,160

-40

Passive - drift and fixed nets

5,426

5,849

5,748

4,989

4,957

4,303

2,674

2,156

1,963

-64

Passive - gears using hooks

2,268

2,085

2,319

1,286

1,319

1,836

3,036

3,296

3,038

34

Passive - pots and traps

5,918

6,331

6,232

7,170

6,917

6,762

6,654

7,392

6,947

17

Passive - polyvalent

0,140

0,020

0,028

0,027

0,045

0,040

0,000

0,000

0,000

-100

Polyvalent - mobile and passive gears

0,000

0,001

0,014

0,013

0,001

0,001

0,001

0,046

0,024

Total active fleet

141,605

136,958

125,752

117,239

109,843

99,033

88,561

87,136

81,312

-43

Oils: Waste Disposal

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department has undertaken a life cycle assessment of re-refining waste oils into lubricants by (a) burning waste oils as recovered fuel oil in European Waste Incineration Directive-compliant plants and (b) other means of disposal of waste oils. (320750)

DEFRA has not commissioned specific studies on the life cycle assessment of re-refining waste oils into lubricants. However, we are aware of the following life cycle studies conducted by others:

Ecological and energetic assessment of re-refining used oils to base oils: Substitution of primarily produced base oils including semi-synthetic and synthetic compounds:

http://www.geir-rerefining.org/documents/LCA_en_short_version.pdf

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Improving Recycling Report ENV/EPOC/WGWPR(2005)3/FINAL:

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/24/14/35582045.pdf

Critical Review of Existing Studies and Life Cycle Analysis on the Regeneration and Incineration of Waste Oils:

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/studies/oil/waste_oil_xsum.pdf

Poultry: Animal Welfare

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will take steps to encourage chicken producers to meet the conditions of the RSPCA’s Freedom Food scheme. (320849)

Farmers can join a specific assurance scheme or adopt standards which go beyond those required by law if they so wish. The Government encourage membership of the relevant sector assurance schemes such as Red Tractor and Freedom Food. It is not Government’s role, however, to promote one specific assurance scheme over another.

Public Holidays

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of the introduction of an additional public holiday; and if he will make a statement. (315119)

DEFRA would not incur any additional cost to the pay bill, as staff would merely be paid for a day on which they were not working rather than one on which they were.

Sheep: Slaughterhouses

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has made a recent assessment of the effects on (a) market transparency and (b) price comparison of variations in standards of sheep carcase dressing; and if he will bring forward legislative proposals to reinstate the dressing specification previously enforced by the Meat and Livestock Commission. (320806)

A report was prepared for DEFRA in November 2008 reviewing the EU carcase classification system for beef and sheep in the light of common agricultural policy reform. This included an assessment of the need for classification in providing transparency.

Under EU legislation, classification of sheep carcases according to the Community scale remains voluntary for member states. DEFRA has no plans to bring forward legislative proposals to make such classification compulsory. Dressing specifications for sheep carcases are a matter for industry supply chains.

Northern Ireland

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many full-time equivalent staff of each grade are employed by his Department to assist special advisers. (321141)

It is the primary responsibility of one member of the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) to assist special advisers. The staff member is at executive officer (EO) level and carries out other tasks too.

Scotland

Departmental Buildings

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department spent on office refurbishments in each of the last 10 years. (320506)

Under the terms of its building leases the Office is required to maintain the buildings to an acceptable standard of decoration and repair. In the case of the Scotland Office’s London premises this includes maintaining a grade one listed building of considerable architectural significance. The Scotland Office does not separately identify the costs of refurbishment from the routine repair and replacement of existing facilities. Over the period of the last 10 years, the Office has shared its accommodation with a number of other Government Departments. The following figures show the gross total for repairs and maintenance of Scotland Office buildings, but does not include the contribution by those Departments towards their share of the costs.

Gross cost (£)

1999-2000

150,354

2000-01

224,719

2001-02

179,335

2002-03

99,310

2003-04

179,853

2004-05

374,129

2005-06

331,803

2006-07

355,071

2007-081

1,011,254

2008-09

401,010

1 Under the terms of the building leases the Office is required to maintain the buildings to an acceptable standard of decoration and repair, which in 2007-08 included roof and exterior repairs to Dover House in London.

Defence

Air Force: Snow and Ice

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what snow clearance equipment is available at Royal Air Force bases. (320915)

The RAF has a variety of Snow and Ice Clearance (SNIC) equipment for the purpose of clearing aircraft and their operating surfaces, such as runways, and roads. This ranges from specialist vehicles for clearing snow and ice from runways and aircraft to ploughs and gritters for roads. Details of the types of SNIC equipment held can be found in the following table:

Description

Purpose

Number held

Trailer Sicard

Towed runway snow clearing rotating brush and blowers

47

Rolba

Self-propelled snow clearing, rotating cutter for deep snow

18

Trailer 600L Team

Trailer towed chemical de-icing spray for aircraft dispersal

48

Trailer 2500L Team

Trailer towed chemical spray for runway de-icing

20

Hydro-Chafer

Trailer towed chemical spray for runway de-icing

3

Trailer 3000L Knights

Trailer towed chemical spray for runway de-icing

21

LADS 10,000 Litre

Self-propelled runway de-icing with snow plough

9

Douglas Aircraft De-Icer

Self propelled high access for aircraft de-icing

12

SDI Aircraft De-icer

Self-propelled high access for aircraft de-icing

7

MATT Snow Plough

Medium snow plough for clearing up to two inches of snow, aircraft dispersals

45

L Blade Snow Plough

Large snow plough for clearing runways (fits to large refueller)

28

K Blade

Large snow plough for clearing runways (fits to Schmidt Runway Sweepers)

6

Trailer Road Gritter 2000 Kg Load

Loose material spreader for roads

36

Trailer Road Gritter 1000 Kg Load

Loose material spreader for roads

9

Land Rover Snow Plough

Small plough for road clearing

14

4 Tonne Vehicle Snow Plough

Medium snow plough for road clearing

14

These resources are adequate for RAF requirements with priority given to operational stations. When required SNIC assets can be relocated as needed.

Armed Forces: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how long on average each patient stayed at DMRC Headley Court in each month since January 2003. (318475)

Using information held on the Defence Patient Tracking System (DPTS), the following table presents the average (mean) length of stay in days for in-patients and residential patients admitted into the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (DMRC) Headley Court in each month from October 2008 to November 2009.

Month of AdmissionAverage (mean) length of admission (days)

In-patients

Residential patients

October 2008

38

17

November 2008

30

17

December 2008

28

13

January 2009

17

21

February 2009

25

19

March 2009

23

18

April 2009

17

19

May 2009

17

16

June 2009

16

18

July 2009

23

19

August 2009

19

21

September 2009

25

18

October 2009

23

19

November 2009

23

20

Notes:

1. Patients include Naval Service Personnel, Army Personnel including those from the Gibraltar Regiment, RAF Personnel, Reservists and UK Civilians. These exclude Special Forces and Other Nations’ Service Personnel.

2. The DPTS is a live system that is constantly being updated. Therefore data are provisional and subject to change.

3. For any patient admitted more than once as an in-patient or residential patient between October 2008 and November 2009, the length of each admission has been calculated separately.

4. An in-patient is a patient that has been admitted and allocated a ward bed. A residential patient is a patient that is on a three week rehabilitation course; they are not allocated a ward bed, but reside in dormitory style accommodation.

Data prior to this period could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Data for later months are still being compiled, including for patients whose stay at Headley Court continues; patients who have not yet completed their stay at DMRC are not included in the figures shown.

Armed Forces: Housing

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether there will be Barnett consequentials for Scotland from the funding for the Armed Forces Home Ownership Scheme in England. (321216)

This pilot scheme for armed forces personnel is being funded from the existing Defence budget. There are no Barnett consequentials.

Armed Forces: Military Decorations

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his policy is on awarding medals to members of the armed forces who served in Aden during the period June 1960 to July 1964. (321049)

The Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals (known as the HD Committee), which considers cases for new medals and makes recommendations to the Queen, has repeatedly made it clear that it does not revisit cases more than five years after the completion of a military campaign.

There is no direct ministerial involvement with the Committee.

Army: Lost Property

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many rounds of ammunition have been reported (a) lost and (b) stolen in each of the last 12 months. (319719)

Copthorne Barracks

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the operating costs for Copthorne Barracks were in each financial year since 2001; (320764)

(2) what estimate he has made of the operating costs for Copthorne Barracks in each of the next three years.

Due to changes in the accounting systems, costs prior to 2003 are not held. Operating costs for Copthorne Barracks since 2003 are shown in the following table.

£ million

2003-04

5.024

2004-05

3.959

2005-06

5.327

2006-07

3.545

2007-08

4.030

2008-09

3.984

2009-10

3.360

Estimated costs for the next three years are as follows;

£ million

2010-11

3.558

2011-12

3.567

2012-13

3.654

The figures have been taken from the operating costs statement and cover property management, utilities and other general infrastructure costs.

Variations are due to changes in the budgetary structure, activity levels for units in Copthorne Barracks and property management projects.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his policy is on the (a) medium-term and (b) long-term future of Copthorne Barracks; and if he will make a statement. (320766)

There are currently no plans to change the use of Copthorne Barracks.

The structure and organisation of the Army and its supporting infrastructure are kept under constant review.

Departmental Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much (a) Ministers and (b) staff of each grade in (i) his Department and (ii) its agencies spent on first class travel in the last 12 months. (320393)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19 October 2009, Official Report, column 1224W, to the hon. Member for Sutton and Cheam (Mr. Burstow) on departmental rail travel.

The breakdown of these figures between Ministers and staff by grade/rank is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Future Large Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 26 February 2010, Official Report, column 773W, on Future Large Aircraft, how much of the £848 million on the A400M programme has been spent under each cost category; and what sums are recoverable should the programme be cancelled. (321183)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by my noble Friend the Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and Ministry of Defence, Lord Drayson, to the noble Lord, Lord Gilbert of Dudley, in another place on 25 January 2010, Official Report, House of Lords, column WA285. The Government do not expect the project to be cancelled, and we reached agreement in principle on the terms of a renegotiation on 5 March.

Gurkhas

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the cost of the public purse has been of the Gurkha Settlement Office in Kathmandu since its inception; (321262)

(2) how many applications for settlement initially refused by the Gurkha Settlement Office have been accepted following re-submission through the Gurkha Army Ex-Servicemen's Organisation.

The Gurkha Settlement Office was opened in October 2009, using existing accommodation and facilities within the British Gurkhas Kathmandu base. It is staffed by four locally employed civilians. The cost of setting up and staffing the office to date is £20,000.

The Gurkha Settlement Office was not set up to process visa application forms. It offers ex-Gurkhas and their dependants, free of charge, information about life in the UK, so that they can reach an informed decision about whether they want to apply for settlement in this country. If they decide that they do wish to apply, then the Gurkha Settlement Office provides support by helping with the completion of visa application forms and through liaison with the Gurkha Records Office to supply some of the documentation needed to support a visa application. The Gurkha Settlement Office has received nearly 4,000 visits and around 2,000 ex-Gurkhas and/or their dependants have registered on the settlement office database for help with their visa application. Visa applications are processed by the UK Border Agency, in their regional centre in New Delhi. Under the new immigration rules over 6,600 visa applications have been received from ex-Gurkhas and their dependants and over 3,650 visas have been authorised or issued. It is not known how many of these applicants may have sought help from the Gurkha Army Ex-Servicemen's Organisation (GAESO) when preparing their application forms.

Nimrod Aircraft

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what long-range maritime cover will be in place following the withdrawal of the Nimrod Mk2s in April 2010 prior to the introduction of the Nimrod Mk4s in 2012. (320925)

I refer the right hon. Member to the answer the Minister for the Armed Forces, my hon. Friend the Member for Harlow (Bill Rammell), gave on 1 February 2010, Official Report, column 47W, to the hon. Member for Woodspring (Dr. Fox).

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what representations he has received from representatives of (a) the Scottish Fishermen's Federation and (b) Oil and Gas UK on the removal from service of the Nimrod MR2. (321368)

Ministers have received no representations from these bodies on the removal from service of the Nimrod MR2.

Royal Irish Regiment

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many applications for an extension to service beyond the age of 55 with the Home Service Battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment were (a) approved and (b) rejected in (i) 2005, (ii) 2006 and (iii) 2007. (321173)

[holding answer 8 March 2010]: The number of approved applications to extend service beyond the age of 55 with the Home Service Battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment in each of the specified years was as follows:

Number of approved applications

2005

5

2006

15

2007

1

1 Denotes fewer than five but more than zero

Note:

All figures have been rounded to the nearest five.

Since the disbandment of the Home Service Battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment, the number of rejected applications is no longer held.

World War II: Memorials

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if his Department will take steps to commemorate those who died on RMS Lancastria, on the 70th anniversary of the sinking of the ship on 17 June 1940. (320863)

Each year the whole country pauses in reflection and remembrance of the sacrifice and loss of life for all those who have died as a result of conflict. This includes all of those service personnel and civilians who perished on RMS Lancastria on 17 June 1940.

The Ministry of Defence has no current plans to commemorate the 70th anniversary. However, during the Merchant Navy Day Commemorative Service due to coincide with the anniversary on 17 June 2010 in Trinity Gardens, Tower Hill, London, particular attention will be given to marking the loss of the many lives on board RMS Lancastria.

Culture, Media and Sport

Bletchley Park Museum

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much funding was allocated to the Bletchley Park Museum in each of the last 10 years. (318075)

The Bletchley Park Trust received a development grant of £460,500 from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 2009, primarily to support the development and improvement of the Bletchley Park Museum.

Additionally the Bletchley site has benefited from an English Heritage grant of £330,000 in 2008 towards repairs to the roof of the main mansion building.

Cricket: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if he will assess the effect on revenues of grass-roots cricket clubs of the inclusion of the Ashes in the list of group A and B sporting events to be covered on terrestrial television. (320950)

Any decision about which sporting events should be listed will take account of the possible impact on the finance of sporting bodies, including grassroots community sports, and on affected broadcasters.

I will consider this matter fully in light of all the material and views that will be generated by the consultation process which ends on 19 March.

Culture: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much funding has been allocated to his Department's Rewired Culture event on 27 March 2010; and how much such funding had been spent on the latest date for which figures are available. (319029)

[holding answer 1 March 2010]: The Rewired Culture event and a publication on digitisation for the cultural sector have an indicative budget of £15,000.

Departmental Databases

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the cost of installing the Human Resources Information System (Oracle) in his Department has been to date. [Official Report, 30 March 2010, Vol. 508, c. 9MC.] (320812)

Since October 2008, the cost of installing the Oracle Human Resources Information System in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has been £544,563.26.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much his Department has spent on external consultants in respect of the Human Resources Information System (Oracle) to date. [Official Report, 30 March 2010, Vol. 508, c. 10MC.] (320813)

Since October 2008, my Department has spent £294,849.19 on external consultants in respect of the Human Resources Information Systems (Oracle).

Departmental Location

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much his Department spent on the relocation of staff from posts in (a) Essex and (b) Castle Point constituency in each of the last five years. (321433)

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has not spent any money on the relocation of staff from posts in either Essex or Castle Point in the last five years.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many full-time equivalent staff of each grade are employed by his Department to assist special advisers. (321132)

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport employs one full-time equivalent at civil service grade executive officer to assist two special advisers.

Departmental Public Consultation

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much his Department spent on (a) written consultation, (b) consultation road shows and (c) focus groups in each of the last three years. (319762)

Information for departmental spend on written consultations specifically is not held centrally. There have been no consultation road shows in the last three years. For the last three full financial years, the focus groups spend for the Department is in the table. All consultations are published on the Department’s website:

www.culture.gov.uk

Financial year

Departmental focus group spend (£)

2006-07

24,400

2007-08

80,105

2008-09

30,623

Other research commissioned is likely to have included a focus group element but it is not possible to determine the costs of these elements.

Departmental Public Expenditure

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many cases of financial irregularities have been recorded in his Department in each of the last five financial years; and if he will make a statement. (320896)

The Treasury guidance, ‘Managing Public Money’ defines irregularities as spend outside legal powers, parliamentary consents, or Treasury delegations. On that basis, the Department has reported financial irregularities over the last five years as follows:

Financial year

Number of cases

2004-05

0

2005-06

0

2006-07

0

2007-08

1

2008-09

0

Departmental Travel

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much (a) Ministers and (b) staff of each grade in (i) his Department and (ii) its agency spent on first class travel in the last 12 months. (320397)

All travel by Ministers and staff is undertaken in accordance with the Ministerial Code and the Civil Service Management Code.

The Department’s system does not analyse total travel expenditure by grade of staff or class of travel. To obtain this information would incur disproportionate cost.

The only information on first class travel which is available and which is for travel pre-booked through the Department’s contracted travel agents only, is set out in the following table.

£

Financial year

Ministers

Staff

2009-101

8,490

24,410

2008-092

7,340

46,030

1 To January 2010.

2 Full year costs.

Foreign Companies: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much funding his Department has provided to organisations or companies registered abroad in each of the last five years. (318625)

[holding answer 25 February 2010]: The Department paid subscriptions to international bodies in each of the last five years as set out in the following table.

£

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-101

European Audiovisual Observatory

162,351

177,951

146,721

212,678

239,101

United Nations:

World Tourism Organisation

315,116

113,213

World Heritage Fund

128,443

107,964

125,035

129,159

140,654

World Anti-Doping Association

343,445

358,596

338,757

378,312

475,470

Council of Europe: Enlarged

Partial Agreement on Sport

55,533

97,893

634,239

644,511

666,046

1,133,158

968,438

1 Forecast

Details of other spend with overseas trade suppliers can only be identified at disproportionate cost.

Illegal Immigrants

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many staff his Department and its agencies have appointed who were later discovered to be illegal immigrants since 2005. (320441)

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport and The Royal Parks Agency have found no illegal immigrants working for them since 2005.

National Skills Academy for Creative and Cultural Skills: Thurrock

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent progress has been made on establishing cross-cutting procedures to enable progress to be made on the (a) funding for and (b) construction of a site shared with the Royal Opera House campus, Thurrock of the Creative and Cultural Skills Academy. (320598)

[holding answer 4 March 2010]: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has worked closely with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Department for Communities and Local Government to progress the National Skills Academy for Creative and Cultural Skills (NSA) and the Royal Opera House Production Park.

In November 2009, the Learning and Skills Council committed £5 million to the NSA. Discussions have taken place with the Homes and Communities Agency on funding.

Thurrock Thames Gateway Development Corporation handed over the Royal Opera House Production Workshops to the Royal Opera House on the 2 March 2010. The completion date for this project is November 2010 and it will house the creation of costumes and scenery.

Public Houses: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many public houses there were in (a) the London borough of Bexley and (b) Greater London in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2009. (321058)

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has collated annual statistics from licensing authorities relating to alcohol, entertainment and late night refreshment since the implementation of the Licensing Act 2003. This does not identify the number of pubs, as there is no official or established definition of a pub which distinguishes it from other premises which sell alcohol.

Prior to the implementation of the Licensing Act 2003, data were collected by petty sessional division (magistrates court areas) on a triennial basis. As at 30 June 1998, there were 135 public houses in Bexley and 8,844 public houses in London. This definition of a public house includes hotels and premises (other than those licensed under part IV of the Licensing Act 1964) having a justices’ on-licence.

Public Libraries: Greater London

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many public libraries there were in (a) the London borough of Bexley and (b) Greater London in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2009. (321059)

Public library statistics are published annually by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA). Data for 2009 are not yet available. The total number of service points (including mobile libraries) in Bexley and Greater London open 10 or more hours per week at 31 March 1997 and 2008 are in the table.

1997

2008

London borough of Bexley

15

13

Greater London

405

388

Swimming: Concessions

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Bexleyheath and Crayford of 1 March 2010, Official Report, column 658, what discussions he has had with the Minister for the Olympics on the take up of free swimming initiatives by Bexley borough council; and on what date Bexley borough council commenced offering free swimming. (320737)

The Secretary of State has had no specific discussions with the Minister for the Olympics on the take up of the free swimming initiative by Bexley borough council.

Bexley borough council commenced offering free swimming in April 2009.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (1) what representations he has received from (a) members of the public and (b) local authorities on charging for swimming floats by leisure centres which participate in the Government’s free swimming initiative; (320891)

(2) whether funding provided under his Department’s free swimming initiative is intended to cover the use of (a) swimming floats and (b) other swimming aids.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has received no representations from members of the public or local authorities on charging for swimming floats by leisure centres which participate in the Government’s free swimming initiative.

The Government provide revenue funding to local authorities who are responsible for the delivery of the Free Swimming Programme. The scheme enables people aged 60 and over and young people aged 16 and under to swim for free.

Theatre: Young People

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much funding was provided to each theatre participating in the free theatre tickets scheme; and how many tickets each theatre agreed to make available. (317187)

Theatres wishing to participate in the “A Night Less Ordinary” scheme were invited to apply for one of four types of grants by Arts Council England.

According to the type of venue, the location and the number of tickets each venue expected to be able to give away, participants received either:-

a multi award of £300 000 for one large West End consortium;

a premium award of £50,000 for larger ticket allocations;

a standard award of £30,000 for regular ticket allocations;

a flexible award of £10,000 for smaller ticket allocations.

Arts Council England has supplied a full list of participating theatres by award category in the following table.

Name of venue

Region

Band

London Off West End Consortium (Almeida, Battersea Arts Centre, Bush Theatre, Donmar Warehouse, Greenwich Theatre, Hampstead Theatre, Lyric Hammersmith, Royal Court, Soho Theatre, Tricycle Theatre, Theatre Royal Stratford East, Young Vic)

London

Multi award

Barbican Centre

London

Premium

Rose Theatre, Kingston

London

Premium

National Theatre

London

Premium

The Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury

South East

Premium

Chichester Festival Theatre

South East

Premium

HQ Theatres Ltd (Wycombe Swan, High Wycombe; Beck Theatre, Hayes; Southend Theatres; The Wyvern Theatre, Swindon; White Rock Theatre, Hastings)

National

Premium

The Works (Dance and Theatre Cornwall) (Carn to Cove, representing 62 village halls; The Acorn Arts Centre, Penzance; Sterts Theatre, Upton Cross; The Keay Theatre, St. Austell; Helford Theatre, Truro)

South West

Premium

Theatre Royal, Plymouth

South West

Premium

Birmingham Hippodrome

West Midlands

Premium

Birmingham Rep

West Midlands

Premium

Malvern Theatres

West Midlands

Premium

Royal Shakespeare Company

West Midlands

Premium

West Yorkshire Playhouse

Yorkshire

Premium

York Royal Theatre

Yorkshire

Premium

Royal and Derngate, Northampton

East Midlands

Standard

Nottingham Playhouse

East Midlands

Standard

The Pleasance Theatre Islington

London

Standard

Hackney Empire Studio Theatre

London

Standard

Trafalgar Studios

London

Standard

Areola Theatre Production Company

London

Standard

Polka Theatre

London

Standard

The Churchill, Bromley

London

Standard

Sunderland Empire

North East

Standard

North East Newcastle Theatres (Theatre Royal, Northern Stage, Live Theatre)

North East

Standard

Contact

North West

Standard

West Cumbria Arts Partnership (Theatre by the Lake, Keswick; Rosehill Theatre, Whitehaven; Kirkgate Centre, Cockermouth; The Wave, Maryport; Arts Out West-West Cumbria rural touring scheme)

North West

Standard

Royal Exchange Theatre

North West

Standard

Blackpool Grand

North West

Standard

Dukes Playhouse

North West

Standard

Oldham Coliseum Theatre

North West

Standard

The Octagon Theatre, Bolton

North West

Standard

The Hawth Theatre

South East

Standard

Milton Keynes Theatre

South East

Standard

Nuffield Theatre

South East

Standard

Oxford Playhouse

South East

Standard

Exeter Northcott Theatre

South West

Standard

Lighthouse, Poole's Centre for the Arts

South West

Standard

Belgrade Theatre

West Midlands

Standard

New Vic Theatre

West Midlands

Standard

Regent Theatre, Stoke-On-Trent

West Midlands

Standard

Warwick Arts Centre

West Midlands

Standard

Hull Truck Theatre

Yorkshire

Standard

Sheffield Theatres Trust (Crucible Theatre, Lyceum Theatre, Studio Theatre)

Yorkshire

Standard

Watford Palace Theatre

East

Flexible

Mercury Theatre

East

Flexible

The Hat Factory, Luton

East

Flexible

The Junction

East

Flexible

South Holland Centre

East Midlands

Flexible

Derby Live (Assembly Rooms and Guildhall Theatre)

East Midlands

Flexible

Blue Elephant Theatre

London

Flexible

Half Moon

London

Flexible

Tara

London

Flexible

artsdepot

London

Flexible

Gate Theatre

London

Flexible

Millfield Arts Centre

London

Flexible

The Albany

London

Flexible

Harrow Arts Centre

London

Flexible

Orange Tree Theatre

London

Flexible

Roundhouse

London

Flexible

Rich Mix

London

Flexible

Darlington Civic Theatre/Darlington Arts Centre

North East

Flexible

The Customs House

North East

Flexible

Forum twenty eight

North West

Flexible

The Met Arts Centre

North West

Flexible

Liverpool Everyman Playhouse

North West

Flexible

Library Theatre Company

North West

Flexible

Marine Hall and Thornton Little Theatre

North West

Flexible

Highlights Rural Touring Scheme

North West/North East

Flexible

Farnham Maltings

South East

Flexible

Hampshire Small Scale Venues (Ashcroft Arts Centre, Farnham; Forest Arts Centre, New Milton; Havant Arts Centre; West End Centre, Aldershot; Winchester Discovery Centre)

South East

Flexible

The Live Theatre Winchester Trust (Theatre Royal Winchester, New Theatre Royal, Portsmouth)

South East

Flexible

Assembly Hall Theatre

South East

Flexible

South Hill Park Arts Centre

South East

Flexible

PANeK Consortia (PANeK; Gulbenkian Theatre, Canterbury; Theatre Royal Margate; Trinity Theatre, Tunbridge Wells, South Hill Park Arts Centre)

South East

Flexible

Merlin Theatre

South West

Flexible

Arc Theatre Trowbridge

South West

Flexible

Culture Swindon (Swindon Arts Centre, Artsmad)

South West

Flexible

Air in G

South West

Flexible

Oakengates Theatre @ The Palace, Telford

West Midlands

Flexible

Breaking Boundaries (Ludlow Assembly Rooms, Arts Alive Touring Scheme)

West Midlands

Flexible

The Drum

West Midlands

Flexible

Playbox Theatre

West Midlands

Flexible

Courtyard Centre for the Arts

West Midlands

Flexible

Lawrence Batley Theatre/LBT

Yorkshire

Flexible

The Civic

Yorkshire

Flexible

Lamproom Theatre, Barnsley

Yorkshire

Flexible

Square Chapel Centre for the Arts

Yorkshire

Flexible

National Rural Touring Forum

Yorkshire

Flexible

The Plowright Theatre

Yorkshire

Flexible

The Carriage Works

Yorkshire

Flexible

The “A Night Less Ordinary” scheme plans to make available over 600,000 tickets over two years. Arts Council England cannot provide the number of tickets individual theatres have agreed to make available for reasons of commercial confidentiality.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many young people have used theatre tickets provided under the A Night Less Ordinary scheme since the scheme was introduced. (320661)

In the first nine months of the ‘A Night Less Ordinary’ Scheme 122,818 tickets were given away to young people under 26. There is no central monitoring of the scheme, but we are undertaking a comprehensive evaluation which will include assessment of how many young people took advantage of the scheme and the potential impact on long-term attendance.

Tourism

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what incentives his Department provides to encourage local authorities to support local tourism initiatives. (319829)

[holding answer 1 March 2010]: Responsibility for tourism in the English regions was given to the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) in 2003. The RDAs have developed regional tourism strategies, taking into account the needs of, and opportunities for, localities and destinations within their regions.

The RDAs have invested substantially in tourism development and promotion investing some £60 million in 2008-09. Local authorities are also important partners in supporting the visitor economy. The Local Government Association is represented on the Ministers' Tourism Advisory Council and the DCMS engages regularly with local bodies such as the British Resorts and Destinations Association and Destination Performance UK.

Alongside the marketing campaigns conducted by VisitBritain and VisitEngland, a number of DCMS programmes encourage and enable local authorities to develop and promote their tourism offer. DCMS sponsors “Sea Change”, which has allocated £38 million to 32 seaside resorts, to support projects for cultural regeneration and the visitor economy. The “Renaissance in the Regions” programme is a ground-breaking initiative to transform England's regional museums. Renaissance has seen an investment of £242.8 million from 2002-09 and it is anticipated that nearly £300 million will have been invested by March 2011. We have seen recently, in the long queues at Bristol for the Banksy temporary exhibition and at Birmingham for the display of the Staffordshire Hoard of Anglo Saxon Gold, how these revitalized museums can encourage tourism.

Most recently, following on from the success of Liverpool European Capital of Culture, the DCMS launched the “UK City of Culture” competition, challenging bidding cities to develop a substantial programme of cultural activity which leads to a demonstrable step-change in their area, and a lasting legacy. Fourteen cities submitted initial bids, with Birmingham, Derry/Londonderry, Norwich and Sheffield succeeding in being shortlisted. The winning city will be announced in the summer.

In addition, whilst funding decisions are for local authorities themselves, to make, DCMS supports the Charter for Placemaking and Destination Management, developed through the “Partners for England” initiative, which provides guidance to local authorities on promoting, developing and measuring tourism, and on working with the industry and public sector partners. Local authority support and engagement will also be addressed in the England tourism strategy, currently being developed by VisitEngland.

To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether his Department has made an investigation into the reasons for the closure of tourist and visitor centres in 2008-09; and if he will make a statement. (320975)

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has discussed the issue of Tourist Information Centre (TICs) closures with VisitEngland, and the Regional Development Agencies.

VisitEngland are undertaking some work to establish how many TICs are closing and what local authorities are doing to provide appropriate information to tourists in their area.

Solicitor-General

Departmental Disabled Staff

To ask the Solicitor-General how many and what proportion of staff of the Law Officers’ Departments are disabled; and what the average salary in the Law Officers’ Departments is of (a) full-time disabled staff, (b) full-time non-disabled staff, (c) part-time disabled staff and (d) part-time non-disabled staff. (317901)

The Law Officers’ Departments routinely provide information on the numbers of disabled staff and average salaries to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) who periodically publish these data on behalf of the whole civil service. The latest available figures were published on 20 January 2010. Specific information relating to the Law Officers’ Departments is outlined in the following tables.

Employment by Department and disability status1

Attorney-General’s Departments

Disabled

Non-disabled

Not declared or non-response

Total

All employees with known disability status

Disabled employees as percentage of known disability status

Crown Prosecution Services

330

6,780

1,580

8,690

7,110

4.7

Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate

30

10

50

30

Attorney-General’s Office

30

20

40

30

Revenue and Customs Prosecutions Office2

10

180

160

350

200

6.6

Serious Fraud Office

20

240

60

320

260

6.6

Treasury Solicitor

40

700

80

830

750

5.9

National Fraud Authority3

20

20

50

20

1 For each column the numbers are rounded to the nearest 10, and numbers less than five are not shown to protect staff confidentiality. The total column will therefore not necessarily equal the sum of the preceding three columns.

2 HMRCPO have since merged with CPS in January 2010.

3 Data for NFA have not been collated or published by ONS. The data provided are based on the latest available data.

Median earnings by Department and disability status1

Attorney-General’s Departments

Full-time non-disabled

Full-time disabled

Part-time non-disabled

Part-time disabled

CPS

27,120

29,520

25,080

25,080

HMCPSI

47,540

AGO

24,440

HMRCPO2

28,250

31,490

28,120

SFO

29,200

26,220

26,970

TSol

46,160

26,480

58,270

NFA3

48,840

1 Salaries in this table represent the full-time equivalent salaries of employees rounded to the nearest 10. Earnings are not shown where there are less than five members to protect staff confidentiality.

2 HMRCPO have since merged with CPS in January 2010.

3 Data for NFA have not been collated or published by ONS. The data provided are based on the latest available data.

Trade Unions

To ask the Solicitor-General how many days staff of the Law Officers’ Departments spent on trade union activity in the latest year for which figures are available; and what recent estimate she has made of the annual cost to the public purse of such activity. (320668)

No days were spent by staff members of the Attorney-General’s Office or the National Fraud Authority on trade union activity in 2008-09.

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate has a Whitley council which meets quarterly and is attended by FDA and Public and Commercial Services Union representatives. Where it is necessary for union representatives to devote time to specific activities on personal cases, this is done by agreement with their line manager. No formal record is maintained.

The Serious Fraud Office does not record details on the number of days spent by staff engaged on trade union activities.

Information on the Treasury Solicitors Department (TSol) and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is contained in the following table.

Department

Estimate of the number of days spent on union activities 2008-09

Estimated cost1 (£)

TSol

354

37,212

CPS2

4,068

535,915

1 These are estimates based on the average pay grade of staff involved in trade union activity.

2The CPS data includes figures for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs Prosecutions Office which merged with CPS in January 2010. 126 days were spent on trade union activities by HMRCPO officials at an estimated cost of £18,791.

International Development

World Water Day

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what plans his Department has to mark World Water Day. (320957)

The Department for International Development (DFID) will mark this important occasion by hosting an event shortly before World Water Day. During the event we will hear what action our stakeholders are taking to address the millennium development goals for water and sanitation, and how best DFID can continue to support their efforts. DFID will also seek to raise awareness of the important of access to water and sanitation for poverty reduction through our website, newsletters and the release of a new publication, reporting on the work we have done to help poor people get access to water and sanitation.

House of Commons Commission

Buildings

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what major refurbishments have been carried out on the House of Commons Estate in the last five years; and what the cost was of each such refurbishment. (320557)

Major refurbishments carried out in the last five years, taken to mean construction projects to improve existing facilities on the Commons part of the parliamentary estate where expenditure has been more than £1 million during the period 1 April 2004 to 31 March 2009, have been shown in the following table.

Refurbishment

Cost in five-year period (£)

Press Gallery refurbishment of offices and catering

8,178,902

7 Millbank cooling

2,730,004

Install data wiring and refurbish—Phase 10B Palace of Westminster

2,634,328

Install data wiring and refurbish—Phase 10A Palace of Westminster

2,025,505

Relocate mechanical and electrical services and underpin south stairs

1,593,201

Boiler, chiller and summer boiler 2002-05

1,582,190

Install air conditioning and restore committee rooms 11, 12, 13

1,552,823

Bellamy's Cafeteria modernisation

1,410,510

Mechanical and electrical modernisation—Palace of Westminster

1,331,382

Nurseries

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission what advice the House of Commons Commission has sought from the Finance and Services Committee on the cost of replacing Bellamy's Bar, the Astor Suite and Bellamy's Clubroom with a day nursery. (321400)

The Commission considered it important to have the planned nursery facility operating early in the new Parliament, before new Members had made other child care arrangements. This is a challenging timescale, given the need for listed building consent and consent for change of use, the time required to make the premises ready and the requirement to pass the Ofsted inspection and be registered with Ofsted. In view of the time constraints, the Commission decided it was not feasible to seek advice from the Finance and Services Committee.

To ask the hon. Member for North Devon, representing the House of Commons Commission if the House of Commons Commission will place in the Library a copy of the full business case for the replacement of Bellamy's Bar, the Astor Suite and Bellamy's Clubroom by a day nursery. (321401)

The full business case is being prepared for submission to the Clerk of the House. Such documents necessarily contain commercially confidential information, the disclosure of which would damage the commercial interests of the House.

Health

Alcoholic Drinks: Health Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on marketing and advertising to encourage the responsible consumption of alcohol in each of the last five years. (321157)

The alcohol harm reduction campaign began in 2006-07 and was run in conjunction with the Home Office until the end of financial year 2008-09. The table shows the Department’s advertising expenditure in these years and does not include spending undertaken by the Home Office.

The figure for the current financial year (2009-10) is provisional until records are fully audited at the end of the financial year.

Financial year

Expenditure (£)

2005-06

0

2006-07

559,883

2007-08

612,792

2008-09

4,771,921

2009-10

3,584,733

The figures do not include recruitment or classified advertising costs. Advertising spend is defined as covering only media spend (inclusive of agency commissions but excluding production costs, Central Office of Information commission and VAT). All figures exclude advertising rebates and audit adjustments and therefore may differ from Central Office of Information official turnover figures.

The advertising campaign is supported by activity in the national health service, for example, the distribution of information materials about the health harms associated with alcohol consumption and practical advice for people considering drinking less. However, figures on expenditure within the NHS are not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Aortic Aneurysm: Screening

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will assess the merits of bringing forward the timetable for full implementation of the NHS abdominal aortic screening programme, with particular reference to (a) feasibility, (b) cost and (c) the likely effects on mortality rates of the early implementation of that programme. (320805)

Immediate implementation was considered as an option and a full analysis of the cost and mortality rates of this approach was made and compared to the analysis of phased implementation. However in common with all other national screening programmes, this programme needs to have a managed national roll-out to realise the benefits of the combination of screening to safe and effective standards. Early implementation would not have allowed sufficient time to reorganise treatment services in order to minimise mortality and morbidity in patients having planned surgery.

Autism: Drugs

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what guidance his Department has issued to clinicians on the use of chlorpromazine hydrochloride for the treatment of patients diagnosed with autism; (321393)

(2) what research his Department has (a) commissioned and (b) reviewed on the potential risks to health and other side effects of chlorpromazine hydrochloride prescribed for the treatment of people diagnosed with autism in the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement;

(3) how many fatalities of people diagnosed with autism associated with the use of chlorpromazine hydrochloride and other anti-psychotic medication there were in the last 10 years.;

(4) what guidelines his Department has issued on medication prescribed for the treatment of people diagnosed with autism; and what guidelines are in force on the use of anti-psychotic medication for people with autistic spectrum disorders.

Since the marketing of chlorpromazine, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in conjunction with its independent scientific advisory committee, the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) and its predecessors, has kept the safety of chlorpromazine and other anti-psychotics under close review. Prescribing guidance has been updated to reflect new safety data and the MHRA has also informed health care professionals and patients of the updated prescribing guidance through the regular drug safety bulletin, “Drug Safety Update”, and information posted on the MHRA website.

Reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are collected by the MHRA and CHM through the Yellow Card Scheme. During the time period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2009, the MHRA has received a total of 18 spontaneous suspected fatal ADR reports associated with chlorpromazine in the United Kingdom. None of these cases describe an indication for use of autism or have provided a medical history of the patient having autism. During this 10 year period a total of 39 fatal reports for all anti-psychotics listed the indication as ‘learning disorder/disability’ or ‘behavioural disorder’ or had a medical history of autism, asperger’s disorder, learning disability or behavioural disorder.

The use of medication such as anti-psychotic drugs for behaviour problems is an issue that will most likely be addressed in the clinical guidelines for autistic spectrum disorders in adults and children currently being developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). NICE has not yet indicated when it expects this guidance to be issued to be available to the national health service.

Autism: Health Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will ensure that the national autism strategy provides guidance on reasonable adjustments that public service providers can make to support adults with autism. (320662)

The Government's strategy for adults with autism in England, ‘Fulfilling and Rewarding Lives’, was published on 3 March 2010 and is available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_113369

Copies have been placed in the Library.

The strategy reiterates the requirement under the Disability Discrimination Act 2005 for services to make reasonable adjustments for disabled adults—this includes adults with autism. Within the strategy we have committed to delivering guidance to indicate the kinds of adjustments that might be usefully made, from physical adjustments to premises to improving the ways those delivering services communicate with adults with autism.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has also underlined its commitment to making adjustments for adults with autism using Jobcentre Plus services. As well as making any required reasonable adjustments—such as making use of the most suitable environment or premises for conducting work focused interviews—DWP will also ensure Jobcentre Plus advisers are aware of both the need to make suitable adjustments for adults with autism and of the kinds of adjustments that may be beneficial.

Departmental Ministerial Policy Advisers

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many full-time equivalent staff of each grade are employed by his Department to assist special advisers. (321137)

Departmental Paper

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a) suppliers and (b) brands of (i) paper and (ii) paper products his Department uses; and what his Department’s policy is on the procurement of those materials. (320029)

Paper purchased by the Department is purchased through the Department’s office supplies contract with Office Depot or through the Central Office of Information (COI) for print and published material. The majority of general printing and copying paper used by the Department is Evolve Everyday or Niceday, 80 gsm, in A3/4/5 sizes. Other paper purchased is from Office Depot or Niceday Environmental (Forest Stewardship Council-certified) range.

All of the Department’s print and publishing is through COI and paper is purchased from companies on the COI EU tendered Framework. Various papers are purchased with 50-100 per cent. recycled content. On rare occasions when viable recycled products are not available other FSC or programme for the endorsement of forest certification schemes—approved virgin fibre products may be purchased.

Paper products purchased by the Department’s cleaning contractor, Resource FM, and consist of toilet paper and paper towels. All toilet paper is Scott Performance 4476, which has a 100 per cent. recycled content. All paper towels purchased by the Department are Wypall Centre Feed, which has 100 per cent. recycled content.

Swantex paper napkins are provided by the Department’s catering contractor, Quadrant Catering Ltd. These are either 100 per cent, recycled content or 10-40 per cent. part recycled and dyed using food dyes.

The Department is committed to only purchasing paper and paper products that conform to the Government’s “Buy Sustainable—Quick Wins” minimum environmental specifications.

General Practitioners: Bexley

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people registered with general practitioners in the London borough of Bexley in each year since 1997. (321061)

Information is not available in the format requested. Following is the number of general practitioner (GP)-registered patients in Bexley Care Trust.

Bexley Care Trust

Number

2002

210,757

2003

214,146

2004

221,325

2005

222,192

2006

223,474

2007

222,019

2008

223,043

Notes:

1. It is not possible to provide comparable work force data for this organisation prior to the formation of the primary care trust in 2002.

2. Figures provided show numbers of patients registered with a GP as at 30 September each year. Data on patient transactions or newly registered patients are not available on the annual GP Census.

Source:

The NHS Information Centre for health and social care General and Personal Medical Services Statistics

General Practitioners: Fees and Charges

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what representations he has received on the levels of charges made by some general practitioners to their patients for a letter in support of applications for disability living allowance and attendance allowance; if he will bring forward proposals to reimburse people who pay such charges; and if he will make a statement. (321217)

None.

Under the terms of their contract with their primary care trust, general practitioners (GPs) are required to issue certain medical certificates, free of charge, which are reasonably required in support of claims for benefits and allowances—such as disability living allowance and attendance allowance. Where patients choose to provide medical information in support of their claim, that is not a mandatory part of the application, the GP may choose to charge a fee.

If further medical evidence is required by the Department of Work and Pensions, they will contact the patient’s GP and pay any fees.

Health Services: Guernsey

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the cost to the NHS of (a) emergency and (b) non-emergency treatment of people from Guernsey in each of the last five years. (321261)

I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave him on 8 March 2010, Official Report, columns 58-60W.

Home Care Services: Finance

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 296W, on social services: finance, which of his Department's communication and advertising budgets will be affected by the changes to planned expenditure to cover funding of the provisions of the Personal Care at Home Bill; and how much will be taken from each budget. (318888)

I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Boston and Skegness (Mark Simmonds) on 8 December 2009, Official Report, column 296W.

Hospitals: Consultants

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance his Department provides to NHS hospitals on daily hours of consultant cover in (a) maternity units, (b) paediatric assessment units and (c) accident and emergency departments. (321397)

The medical Royal Colleges advise on clinical standards. It is for local national health service organisations to determine the medical skill mix they require to provide safe and high quality clinical care.

Hospitals: Infectious Diseases

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many cases of infection per (a) 1,000 hospital bed days and (b) 1,000 patients admitted to hospital there were in 2005. (320828)

Information on all infections is not collected centrally. However, data on the main infections covered by mandatory surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infections and Clostridium difficile infections, are given in the following table.

MRSA1

Clostridium difficile (65 years or older)2

Number of cases reported

7,096

51,829

Cases of infection per 1,000 bed days

0.18

2.15

Cases of infection per 1,000 admissions

0.86

21.22

1 Data on MRSA cases, bed days (KH03) and admissions are for the 2005-06 financial year.

2 Based on 2005 calendar year. Prior to April 2007, C. difficile data were only collected for those aged 65 and over. Bed days are from Hospital Episode Statistics. The number of C. difficile cases and rates were based on data from 171 of 173 trusts, as complete data are not available for two trusts.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department collects on numbers of (a) hospital-acquired infections and (b) patients entering hospitals with infections. (320829)

The mandatory surveillance system collects numbers of reports for the following pathogens that are usually considered healthcare associated infections and surgical procedures:

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemias;

Clostridium difficile infections (CDI);

glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) bacteraemias; and

selected orthopaedic surgical site infections (SSIs).

It is not easy to ascertain where an infection has been acquired and these datasets include both infections acquired in hospital and in other settings. However, the MRSA and CDI system now allows for indirect identification of cases that may have been acquired within the reporting trust by calculating the elapsed time between a patient’s admission date and specimen date.

While MRSA bacteraemias and CDI present on admission can be identified, a proportion of these are likely to be associated with a previous hospital admission.

Maternity Services

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many newborn babies experienced methadone withdrawal in the latest period for which figures are available; and what treatments are used in the NHS for the symptoms of withdrawal. (321304)

Data on the number of babies born with neonatal withdrawal symptoms from maternal use of illicit or therapeutic drugs are collected, but are not broken down by type of drug.

In 2008-09, 1,233 babies were born with neonatal withdrawal symptoms from maternal use of illicit or therapeutic drugs.1

The Department and the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse have issued guidance to the national health service to ensure that mothers in this situation are supported and monitored, and the health needs of the baby assessed to minimise any health risks.

Additionally, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence is in the process of producing clinical guidelines for pregnant women with complex social factors, including substance misuse problems.

Source:

1 Hospital Episode Statistics, The Information Centre for health and social care

Medical Treatments Abroad

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many (a) E112 authorisations and (b) Article 49 authorisations for each type of treatment there have been in each year since 1998; (319931)

(2) how many patients have been referred abroad for each treatment in respect of which there were no facilities in the UK in each year since 1998.

A patient may be issued an E112 form and referred to another member state of the European Economic Area or Switzerland for treatment, if they would experience undue delay for that same treatment under their state health care system.

Alternatively, a patient may choose to access health care services in another member state under article 49 (now article 56 of the Lisbon treaty). The responsibility for authorising reimbursement of health costs under article 49 is devolved to primary care trusts, and there is no central collection of the data.

The following table shows the number of E112s, and the number of those that relate to maternity care, issued by the United Kingdom in the years 1998-2009. Member states have agreed that it is appropriate to issue the form E112 on a discretionary basis to expectant mothers who wish to give birth in another member state, regardless of capacity. Data relating to each specific treatment are held centrally, however to process the data and present them by treatment type would incur disproportionate cost.

Calendar year

E112s issued

Number of E112s relating to maternity care

1998

891

304

1999

994

291

2000

1,289

336

2001

1,266

369

2002

1,393

368

2003

1,287

359

2004

503

141

2005

360

128

2006

412

273

2007

534

402

2008

1,471

1,027

2009

1,379

1,228

Mid Staffordshire General Hospitals NHS Trust

To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place in the Library a copy of each item of correspondence received by his Department from the Healthcare Commission on the Mid Staffordshire General Hospitals NHS Trust in (a) 2006, (b) 2007 and (c) 2008. (320782)

Midwives: Manpower

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many full-time equivalent midwives were working in the NHS organisation in each year since 1997; and how many were working in each NHS organisation in each of the last three years. (320920)

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent midwives employed within the national health service in each year since 1997 and a separate table outlining the number of midwives working in each NHS organisation in each of the last three years has been placed in the Library.

NHS hospital and community health services: Qualified midwifery staff in England as at 30 September each specified year

Registered midwives

Full-time equivalent

1997

18,053

1998

18,168

1999

17,876

2000

17,662

2001

18,048

2002

18,119

2003

18,444

2004

18,854

2005

18,949

2006

18,862

2007

19,298

2008

19,639

Source:

The NHS Information Centre for health and social care Non-Medical Workforce Census

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patient deaths have been caused by myelodysplastic syndromes in each year for which figures are available. (321379)

I have been asked to reply.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated March 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many patient deaths have be caused by myelodysplastic syndromes in each year for which figures are available. (321379)

The table attached provides the number of deaths where the underlying cause was myelodysplastic syndromes in England and Wales, for the years 2001 to 2008 (the latest year available).

It is not possible from the information given at death registration to state whether the deceased was a patient at the time of death.

Individual causes of death are coded by ONS using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). Myelodyplastic syndromes are given a specific ICD-10 code (D46), however equivalent information is not readily available for years before 2001, when an earlier version of the International Classification of Diseases was in use.

Table 1. Number of deaths where the underlying cause was myelodysplastic syndromes, England and Wales, 2001-081, 2, 3

Deaths (persons)

2001

995

2002

1,010

2003

1,010

2004

937

2005

917

2006

916

2007

963

2008

963

1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code D46 ‘Myelodysplastic syndromes’.

2 Figures for England and Wales include deaths of non-residents.

3 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many individual funding requests for the drug azacitidine were received by primary care trusts in the last 12 months; and how many were (a) accepted and (b) rejected. (321380)

NHS Foundation Trusts

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what account his Department takes of mortality rates at NHS trusts when deciding whether trusts’ applications for foundation status can proceed to Monitor. (320780)

A significant part of the Department’s assessment of national health service foundation trust applications is the consideration of the quality of care provided at each organisation. This review of quality includes an explicit consideration of hospital standardised mortality rates, alongside other care quality indicators such as patient surveys and safety indicators.

Since April 2009 the Department’s assessment has also included the consideration of each application by the NHS Medical Director. His satisfaction with an organisation is required prior to Ministers considering whether to support a foundation trust application. The NHS Medical Director considers a range of quality related intelligence, including hospital standardised mortality rates, in forming his view on each trust.

NHS: Assets

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the total cost of backlog maintenance in respect of (a) high, (b) significant, (c) moderate and (d) low risk in (i) England and (ii) each NHS organisation according to data from Estates Return Information Collection returns in each financial year from 1997-98 to 2008-09. (318225)

The information is not available in the format requested.

Levels of backlog maintenance categorised by risk were not collected prior to 2004-05. The information relating to each national health service organisation from 2004-05 onwards has been placed in the Library.

Total cost of backlog maintenance cost for England, categorised by risk, is in the table.

£ million

Backlog maintenance

Risk level

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

High risk

358.2

329.9

307.6

309.7

267.9

Significant risk

778.2

982.2

943.4

1,119.8

1,175.7

Moderate risk

902.1

1,219.4

1,231.5

1,394.6

1,452.8

Low risk

1,103.2

1,152.1

1,257.4

1,219.5

1,188.3

Total

3,141.7

3,683.6

3,739.9

4,043.6

4,084.7

The Department collects data on backlog maintenance annually from NHS trusts through its estates return information collection. These data have not been amended centrally and their accuracy is the responsibility of the contributing NHS organisations.

NHS organisations are locally responsible for the provision and maintenance of their facilities. This includes planning and investment to reduce backlog maintenance.

The Government have introduced 100 new hospital schemes which have increased capacity and provided the opportunity to reduce backlog maintenance.

NHS: Procurement

To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 25 February 2010, Official Report, column 753W, on the NHS, when he expects the PCT Procurement Guide to be published. (320247)

NHS: Public Relations

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what payments NHS North West has made to (a) Communiqué and (b) Burston Marsteller; for what services; and on what dates. (320720)

The information requested is not collected centrally. The Department does not collect information on payments made by national health service bodies to their suppliers. This information may be obtained direct from the North West Strategic Health Authority.

Obesity: Children

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of children in (a) Hampshire Primary Care Trust, (b) Southampton Primary Care Trust and (c) nationally were recognised as clinically obese in each age group in each of the last five years. (320819)

The information is not available in the format requested. Data are not held nationally on children who have been diagnosed as clinically obese.

Children trend table 4 in the ‘Health Survey for England—2008 trend tables’ contains the percentage of children aged two to 10 and 11 to 15 in England who are obese in each year between 2004-08. This information has already been placed in the Library. Information is not available by primary care trust (PCT).

Further information on the proportion of children who are obese in England is collected through the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP). Table A in the NCMP main report shows the prevalence of obese children aged four to five years and 10 to 11 years in Hampshire PCT and Southampton PCT between 2006-07 and 2008-09. This information has already been placed in the Library.

Obesity: Surgery

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in each age group in (a) Hampshire Primary Care Trust, (b) Southampton Primary Care Trust and (c) nationally have received gastric surgery of each type for the treatment of obesity in each of the last 10 years. (320818)

Primary Care Trusts: Contracts

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what powers a primary care trust has to influence the result of the sale of the remaining part of a contract with a private provider of out-of-hours care to a different provider; and what account primary care trusts take of local support for private providers in exercising such powers. (321404)

A primary care trust (PCT) should be able to influence the sale of the remainder of a contract to the extent that was set out in the original contract between the PCT and the original out of hours provider.

In exerting any influence a PCT should ensure that it considers the implications for continuity and quality of care as well as value for money.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many cases of sexually transmitted infections were diagnosed in (a) under 12 year-olds, (b) 13 to 15 year-olds, (c) 16 and 17 year-olds and (d) people aged 18 years old or more in each region in each year since 1997; (320783)

(2) how many cases of (a) herpes, (b) Chlamydia, (c) HIV, (d) syphilis and (e) gonorrhoea were diagnosed in people of each age group in each region in each year since 1997.

Information on the number of diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections is not collected in the form requested.

Information on the number of diagnoses for herpes, Chlamydia, HIV, syphilis and gonorrhoea for people under 16, between 16-19 and 20 and over has been placed in the Library.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Essex

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) males and (b) females were diagnosed with (i) syphilis, (ii) gonorrhoea, (iii) Chlamydia (uncomplicated), (iv) herpes (first incidence), (v) genital warts (first incidence), (vi) HIV/AIDS, (vii) trichomonas vaginalis and (viii) non-specific urethritis in (A) the Mid-Essex Hospital Trust area and (B) Essex in each of the last three years. (321301)

Data are only available on the number of diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics by strategic health authority (SHA). Table 1 gives the number of diagnoses for syphilis, gonorrhoea, Chlamydia (uncomplicated), herpes (first incidence), HIV, trichomoniasis, non-specific urethritis in the East of England SHA between 2006 and 2008, the latest date for which figures are available.

Table 2 gives data for the number of new HIV diagnoses in Essex County and Mid Essex Primary Care Trust (PCT) between 2006 and 2008 the latest date for which figures are available.

In addition to STIs diagnosed in GUM clinics, the National Chlamydia Screening programme (NCSP) provides Chlamydia screening to asymptomatic people under the age of 25 in England. The NCSP was launched in 2003 when a phased implementation programme started. Table 3 includes the number of diagnoses of Chlamydia in patients between the ages of 15-24 years in Mid Essex, North East Essex and West Essex PCTs between 2006 to 2009, the latest date for which figures are available.

Table 1: Number of new HIV diagnoses from all services and sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics and in the National Chlamydia Screening programme (NCSP) in East of England, by sex: 2006-09 (calendar year)

Service

STI

Year

Male

Female

Total1

Diagnostic Services

HIV

2006

254

293

547

Diagnostic Services

HIV

2007

275

244

519

Diagnostic Services

HIV

2008

239

232

471

Diagnostic Services

HIV

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Syphilis (primary and secondary)

2006

72

9

81

GUM clinics

Syphilis (primary and secondary)

2007

59

10

69

GUM clinics

Syphilis (primary and secondary)

2008

55

16

71

GUM clinics

Syphilis (primary and secondary)

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Gonorrhoea (uncomplicated)

2006

560

279

839

GUM clinics

Gonorrhoea (uncomplicated)

2007

539

260

799

GUM clinics

Gonorrhoea (uncomplicated)

2008

519

306

825

GUM clinics

Gonorrhoea (uncomplicated)

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Genital herpes (first incidence)

2006

641

1,093

1,734

GUM clinics

Genital herpes (first incidence)

2007

608

1,275

1,883

GUM clinics

Genital herpes (first incidence)

2008

705

1,370

2,075

GUM clinics

Genital herpes (first incidence)

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Genital warts

2006

3,483

3,209

6,692

GUM clinics

Genital warts

2007

3,690

3,457

7,147

GUM clinics

Genital warts

2008

3,825

3,508

7,333

GUM clinics

Genital warts

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Trichomoniasis

2006

16

290

306

GUM clinics

Trichomoniasis

2007

13

286

299

GUM clinics

Trichomoniasis

2008

14

308

322

GUM clinics

Trichomoniasis

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Non-specific urethritis

2006

7,438

948

8,386

GUM clinics

Non-specific urethritis

2007

7,651

776

8,427

GUM clinics

Non-specific urethritis

2008

7,530

625

8,155

GUM clinics

Non-specific urethritis

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

GUM clinics

Chlamydia (uncomplicated)

2006

3,745

4,557

8,302

GUM clinics

Chlamydia (uncomplicated)

2007

4,519

5,215

9,734

GUM clinics

Chlamydia (uncomplicated)

2008

4,787

5,291

10,078

GUM clinics

Chlamydia (uncomplicated)

2009

n/a

n/a

n/a

NCSP

Chlamydia

2006

267

1,132

1,399

NCSP

Chlamydia

2007

488

1,235

1,724

NCSP

Chlamydia

20082

1,171

3,637

4,835

NCSP

Chlamydia

2009

2,189

5,574

7,796

1 Total includes those with unknown/unspecified sex. Therefore the sum of male and female diagnoses might not equal the total number of diagnoses.

2 NCSP data for 2008 include non NCSP non GUM information reported for the period 1 April 2008 - 31 December 2008.

Notes:

New HIV Diagnoses data:

1. Numbers will rise as further reports are received.

2. Diagnoses are from reports received to end December 2009.

3. Patients may live with HIV for many years before they are diagnosed. Therefore new diagnosis data do not necessarily reflect recently acquired infections.

4. Areas when presented are area of diagnosis and not of residence, there is evidence that a large proportion of individuals are diagnosed outside their PCT of residence.

5. Data are unavailable for 2009.

Source:

Health Protection Agency, New HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom. Date of data: 31

December 2009

GUM data:

1. Data are only provided at the SHA level.

2. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are for diagnoses made in GUM clinics only. Diagnoses made in other clinical settings, such as General Practice, are not recorded in the KC60 dataset.

3. The data available from the KC60 statutory returns are the number of diagnoses made, not the number of patients diagnosed.

4. The information provided has been adjusted for missing clinic data.

5. Data are unavailable for 2009.

Source:

Health Protection Agency, KC60 returns. Date of data: July 2009

NCSP data:

1. NCSP data consist of returns from the NCSP core dataset and non NCSP non GUM laboratory returns.

2. The NCSP has been phased in since 1 April 2003 with all 152 PCTs reporting data to the programme since March 2008. Non NCSP non GUM data have been collected since 1 April 2008 from laboratories in England and are reported to the NCSP. Therefore note that numbers of diagnoses have risen substantially as an increasing proportion of the target population have been tested.

3. Data are based on those aged 15-24 years inclusive.

4. Data are presented by PCT of residence and exclude those resident outside of England.

5. Data available from the NCSP are the number of diagnoses made and not the number of patients diagnosed.

6. Data presented are based on tests with confirmed positive diagnoses only.

Source:

The National Chlamydia Screening programme Core dataset. Date of data: 3 February 2010; Non NCSP non GUM data. Date of data: 03 March 2010

Table 2: Number of new HIV diagnoses from all services in Essex county and Mid Essex PCT, by sex: 2006-08 (calendar year)

Area

STI

Year

Male

Female

Total

Mid Essex

HIV

2006

7

12

19

Mid Essex

HIV

2007

16

13

29

Mid Essex

HIV

2008

7

5

12

Essex County

HIV

2006

76

99

175

Essex County

HIV

2007

83

91

174

Essex County

HIV

2008

51

63

114

Notes:

1. Numbers will rise as further reports are received.

2. Diagnoses are from reports received to end December 2009.

3. Patients may live with HIV for many years before they are diagnosed. Therefore new diagnosis data do not necessarily reflect recently acquired infections.

4. Areas when presented are area of diagnosis and not of residence, there is evidence that a large proportion of individuals are diagnosed outside their PCT of residence.

5. Mid Essex PCT includes hospitals in the Mid Essex Hospital Trust area.

6. Data are unavailable for 2009.

Source:

Health Protection Agency, New HIV diagnoses in the United Kingdom. Date of data: 31 December 2009

Table 3: Number of Chlamydia diagnoses outside of GUM within Essex county, by PCT and sex: 2006-09 (calendar year)

Area

STI

Year

Male

Female

Total1

Mid Essex

Chlamydia

2006

0

<5

<5

Mid Essex

Chlamydia

2007

5

12

17

Mid Essex

Chlamydia

20082

56

135

192

Mid Essex

Chlamydia

2009

210

334

544

North East Essex

Chlamydia

2006

<5

0

<5

North East Essex

Chlamydia

2007

<5

<5

7

North East Essex

Chlamydia

20082

162

301

465

North East Essex

Chlamydia

2009

237

524

763

South East Essex

Chlamydia

2006

31

193

224

South East Essex

Chlamydia

2007

87

190

277

South East Essex

Chlamydia

20082

106

354

462

South East Essex

Chlamydia

2009

149

418

569

South West Essex

Chlamydia

2006

9

22

31

South West Essex

Chlamydia

2007

26

93

119

South West Essex

Chlamydia

20082

85

283

373

South West Essex

Chlamydia

2009

140

408

549

West Essex

Chlamydia

2006

<5

<5

10

West Essex

Chlamydia

2007

6

32

38

West Essex

Chlamydia

20082

48

138

186

West Essex

Chlamydia

2009

47

201

251

1 Total includes those with unknown/unspecified sex. Therefore the sum of male and female diagnoses might not equal the total number of diagnoses.

Cells with numbers less than five and cells with the second lowest value where appropriate have been masked.

2 NCSP data for 2008 include non NCSP non GUM information reported for the period 1 April 2008-31 December 2008.

Notes:

1. NCSP data consist of returns from the NCSP core dataset and non NCSP non GUM laboratory returns.

2. The NCSP has been phased in since 1 April 2003 with all 152 PCTs reporting data to the programme since March 2008. Non NCSP non GUM data have been collected since 1 April 2008 from laboratories in England and are reported to the NCSP. Therefore note that numbers of diagnoses have risen substantially as an increasing proportion of the target population have been tested.

3. Data are based on those aged 15-24 years inclusive.

4. Data are presented by PCT of residence and exclude those resident outside of England.

5. Data available from the NCSP are the number of diagnoses made and not the number of patients diagnosed.

6. Data presented are based on tests with confirmed positive diagnoses only.

Source:

The National Chlamydia Screening programme core dataset. Date of data: 3 February 2010, Non NCSP non GUM data. Date of data: 3 March 2010.

Women and Equality

Rape: Victim Support Schemes

To ask the Minister for Women and Equality how much funding has been allocated to Baroness Stern’s review of the treatment of survivors of rape by the police and other agencies in England and Wales. (316955)

The Government Equalities Office jointly commissioned the Stern Review with the Home Office.

Baroness Stern’s review of rape reporting in England and Wales has been allocated up to a maximum of £170,000 programme spend.

In the course of her review, Baroness Stern has consulted widely with key stakeholders in all English regions and Wales, including police forces, local authorities, the Crown Prosecution Service, the health service and third sector organisations. She is also taking into account the work of Sara Payne, the Victims’ Champion, and Sir George Alberti, who is leading a Department of Health taskforce on the health aspects of violence against women and girls.

As the review is still under way, final costs are yet to be established.

Children, Schools and Families

Education: International Cooperation

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many teachers and teaching assistants from each local authority have participated in the Teachers' International Professional Development Programme in each year since 2000; (318234)

(2) how much funding in respect of the Teachers' International Professional Development Programme has been allocated to each local authority in each year since 2000.

There are three strands to the Teachers International Professional Development (TIPD) programme: local authority led study visits on a theme decided by the relevant local authority with 2000 places each year; school determined visits to examine a theme of study decided by the schools engaged, with 500 visits each year; and a programme of study visits to developing countries with 80 places each year.

The information on the number of teachers and teaching assistants from each local authority who have participated in the Teachers International Professional Development Programme visits for the period 2000-01 to 2006-07 is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Information on the number of teachers taking part in local authority led study visits by local authority; information on the number of teachers taking part in study visits on the developing country strand; and for school determined study visits for 2007-08, 2008-09 and the anticipated out-turn for 2009-10 has been placed in the House Libraries.

Funding for the Teachers International Professional Development (TIPD) programme is not distributed to local authorities. Funding passes to the four programme delivery organisations, each of which is contracted to deliver a specified number of places. Each provider receives an indication of how many places on the programme each local authority might expect, with places not taken up by local authorities re-allocated to authorities where demand outstrips their allocation.

Educational Institutions: Tower Hamlets

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (1) how many colleges in the London borough of Tower Hamlets had an application for accreditation refused in the last 12 months; (314850)

(2) how many colleges in the London borough of Tower Hamlets lost their accreditation in the last 12 months.

[holding answer 3 February 2010]: I have been asked to reply.

The UK Border Agency does not hold figures on the number of colleges applying for accreditation from one of its approved accrediting bodies for the purposes of educational quality. However, a total of eight colleges in the London borough of Tower Hamlets had an application for a Tier 4 Sponsor Licence refused in the last 12 months.

Faith Schools: Equality

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families if he will bring forward legislative proposals to provide that the exceptions to the equality duty contemplated in clause 29 of and schedule 3, part 2 to the Equality Bill be extended to faith schools in the public sector; and if he will make a statement. (317017)

In relation to their pupils, faith schools are not covered by clause 29 of the Equality Bill as a result of clause 28(2). They are instead covered by Part 6 of the Bill and the exceptions they need to operate are provided in that Part and in Schedule 11. In relation to other services and public functions provided by faith schools, the exceptions contained in Clause 29 will apply to all public bodies, including maintained faith schools. The exceptions in Part 2 of Schedule 3 apply mainly to local authorities in relation to their education functions. Where they need to apply more widely, including to maintained faith schools, they do. An example of this is paragraph 11 of the Schedule. There is no need for additional legislation.

Parenting Orders

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many parenting orders were issued because of (a) poor behaviour in school and (b) truancy in (i) 1997, (ii) 2005 and (iii) the latest year for which figures are available. (317819)

We have been collecting data on parenting orders since 2004.

The number of parenting orders made following truancy prosecution (ancillary orders) is 427 for 2004/05, 505 in 2005/06, 602 in 2007/08 and 396 for 2008/09.

All 150 local authorities have systems in place to use orders for behaviour in appropriate cases, but no orders have yet been issued. Parenting orders for behaviour are a last resort measure, intended only for parents that will not engage with voluntary measures, and were never expected to be used in great volume. The number of parenting contracts for behaviour accepted by parents is 410 for 2004/05, 1898 for 2005/06, 2535 for 2006/07, 2546 for 2007/08 and 3528 for 2008/09.

Personal Social and Health Education

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what training will be given to teachers of the personal, social, health and economic education curriculum to respond appropriately to a child or young person, who, during such teaching, discloses abuse. (312701)

All school staff who work with children should undertake training to equip them to carry out their responsibilities for child protection effectively, which is kept up to date by refresher training at three-yearly intervals. In addition to this, all staff in schools should follow the guidance contained in “What to do if you're worried a child is being abused”. This practice guidance tells people about the procedures to follow when passing on concerns and what will then happen.

Schools: Fires

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families what recent steps he has taken to improve fire safety in schools. (318627)

[holding answer 26 February 2010]: DCSF has comprehensive guidance on fire safety in schools on its fire safety portal at:

www.teachernet.gov.uk/fire

In March 2007 the then Schools Minister, my right hon. Friend the Member for South Dorset (Jim Knight), announced the Government's new policy on sprinklers and their value as a measure against arson. He said:

“It is now our expectation that all new schools will have fire sprinklers installed. However, we do not intend to make this a compulsory measure. There may be a few cases where local authorities or other promoters of schools consider that sprinklers are not needed. If so, they will need to be able to demonstrate that such schools are low risk and that sprinklers would not represent good value for money.”

Teachers: Training

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many (a) applications were received for and (b) places were awarded on (i) graduate teacher programmes, (ii) Bachelor of Education programmes, (iii) Postgraduate Certificate of Education programmes and (iv) Teach First programmes in the last 12 months for which figures are available. (314909)

[holding answer 2 February 2010]: The table shows the number of applications and acceptances to mainstream postgraduate initial teacher training (ITT) courses in England for entry in 2009-10.

Postgraduate applications and acceptances to ITT courses; year of entry: 2009-10 (provisional), Coverage: England

Number of applications

Number of acceptances

Primary

20,440

8,660

Middle

500

330

Secondary

31,740

15,180

Total

52,670

24,170

Notes:

Figures presented in this table have been published in the GTTR website at:

http://www.gttr.ac.uk/providers/statistics/applicantstatistics/

Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. There may be discrepancies between the sum of constituent items and totals as shown.

Some applications to postgraduate ITT courses are made independently of the GTTR and are not included in the figures.

Source:

Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR)

The Annual Training and Development Agency for Schools Report states that there were 2,900 applications for Cohort 7 of the Teach First Programme (to start the scheme in 2009-10). Of these, 485 places were awarded.

Data on applications for mainstream undergraduate ITT (such as Bachelor of Education) and the Graduate Teacher Programme are not available centrally.

The number of recruits to ITT courses by the various routes and programmes has been published in Tables A1 and A2 of the Statistical First Release: School Workforce in England (23/2009) at:

http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000874/index.shtml

These tables show that in 2009-10 there were 7,920 new entrants undergraduate ITT courses and 25,090 entrants to postgraduate ITT courses. The latest available full year data for employment based routes to ITT refer to 2008-09 and show there were 5,120 new entrants to the Graduate Teacher Programme and 370 entrants to the Teach First Programme.

Truancy

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families how many and in what percentage of cases of parents charged with offences related to failing to ensure their child attended school have ended in a conviction since 1997. (318273)

[holding answer 24 February 2010]: Information from the Ministry of Justice court proceedings database on the number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences relating to failing to attend school in England, 2001 to 2008 can be viewed in the following table. Prior to 2001 these offences cannot be separately identified.

These data are a further breakdown of those published in the “Criminal Statistics, Supplementary Volumes for England and Wales” for the years 2001 to 2008.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts and average fine imposed for offences relating to ‘failing to attend school’1, 2

Year

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Proceeded against

1,961

3,163

3,849

4,442

4,648

5,999

7,745

9,506

Found guilty

1,595

2,572

3,065

3,549

3,740

4,720

6,035

7,291

Percentage

81.3

81.3

79.6

79.9

80.5

78.7

77.9

76.7

1 Includes the following;

(i) Failure to secure regular attendance at school. (Education Act 1996 S.444 (1)(8)).

(ii) Parent knows that their child is failing to attend school regularly and fails without reasonable justification to cause him or her to attend school. (Education Act 1996 S.444(8)(1a)(8a) added by Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 S.72).

2 Prior to 2001 these offences cannot be separately identified.

Notes:

1. The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

2. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice. [Ref: IOS 85-10]

The increase in the number of cases over this period reflects a sustained drive, led by the Government, to improve levels of school attendance including by encouraging local authorities to make more use of their powers to proceed against parents who are failing in their legal responsibility to ensure their children receive a full time education. The outcome has been a significant improvement in school attendance, with on average 70,000 more pupils in school each day than would be the case if absence rates were still at the level of 1996/97.

To ask the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families pursuant to the answer of 10 February 2010, Official Report, columns 1091-92W, on pupils: absenteeism, if he will provide the equivalent figures for secondary schools in (a) 2005-06 and (b) 2007-08; and if he will provide the equivalent figures for all schools in 2006-07. (318421)

[holding answer 24 February 2010]: The requested information is shown in the tables for 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-08. For information on Persistent Absentees that are white British split by gender in 2006-07, I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 23 February 2010, Official Report, column 548W.

Secondary schools1: Number and proportion of persistent absentees2 by free school meal eligibility, in England

All pupils3

Pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees4

Pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees4

All pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees4

2005/06

71,130

16.0

142,180

5.5

217,390

7.1

2007/08

54,230

12.9

110,000

4.4

167,610

5.6

1 Includes middle schools as deemed, city technology colleges and academies. 2 Persistent absentees are defined as having 64 or more sessions of absence (authorised and unauthorised) during the year, typically over 20 per cent. overall absence rate. 3 Number of pupil enrolments in schools from start of the school year. Includes pupils on the roll for at least one session who are aged between five and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once. 4 The number of persistent absentee enrolments expressed as a percentage of the total number of enrolments with the same characteristics. Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Census.

Maintained primary, state-funded secondary and special schools1, 2, 3: Number and proportion of persistent absentees4 by free school meal eligibility, 2006/07, in England

Pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees6

Pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees6

All pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees6

All pupils5

95,760

9.3

172,010

3.2

272,950

4.1

1 Includes middle schools as deemed. 2 Includes maintained secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies (including all-through academies). 3 Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools. 4 Persistent absentees are defined as having 64 or more sessions of absence (authorised and unauthorised) during the year, typically over 20 per cent. overall absence rate. 5 Number of pupil enrolments in schools from start of the school year up until 25 May 2007. Includes pupils on the roll for at least one session who are aged between five and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once. 6 The number of persistent absentee enrolments expressed as a percentage of the total number of enrolments with the same characteristics. Source: School Census.

Secondary schools1: Number and proportion of persistent absentees2 by free school meal eligibility, in England

White British3

Pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees4

Pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments who are not eligible for free school meals classified as persistent absentees4

All pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees

Proportion of pupil enrolments classified as persistent absentees4

Boys

2005/06

28,200

18.9

58,630

5.4

86,830

7.0

2007/08

21,060

15.5

43,490

4.2

64,540

5.5

Girls

2005/06

28,970

19.6

62,600

5.9

91,570

7.6

2007/08

22,420

16.5

48,720

4.8

71,130

6.2

1 Includes middle schools as deemed, city technology colleges and academies. 2 Persistent absentees are defined as having 64 or more sessions of absence (authorised and unauthorised) during the year, typically over 20 per cent. overall absence rate. 3 Number of pupil enrolments in schools from start of the school year. Includes pupils on the roll for at least one session who are aged between five and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once. 4 The number of persistent absentee enrolments expressed as a percentage of the total number of enrolments with the same characteristics. Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. Source: School Census.

Communities and Local Government

Planning: Public Consultation

17. To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what mechanisms are in place to enable the views of local residents to be taken into account in the consideration of major planning decisions affecting their areas; and if he will make a statement. (321015)

Requirements to publicise planning applications are set out in Article 8 of the General Development Procedure Order. For major developments, this will normally include a site notice or neighbour notification letters, and publication of a notice in a local newspaper.

All representations submitted by local residents within the set consultation period must be taken into account by the local planning authority in determining the application.

Local Government Representation

18. To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent representations he has received on variations in the ratio between the number of people represented and councillors in different local authorities. (321016)