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Army: Manpower

Volume 507: debated on Monday 15 March 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the (a) required, (b) actual and (c) fit-for-task strength is of each corps of the Army; (312658)

(2) what the (a) required, (b) actual and (c) fit for task strength of each corps of the Army (i) was in 1997 and (ii) is in 2010.

Manning in the Army is currently strong. As at 1 January 2010, the trained strength of the Army, including full-time reserve service personnel, was 101,500, This is the highest figure since 1 January 2006. This good position is due to a greater number of recruits entering training and passing out into the Field Army, coupled with an improvement in retention. While this may be attributed in part to the economic climate, a combination of financial incentives and other retention measures have also had an impact. In September 1998 trained strength was 100,490.

In the following table “required strength” and “actual strength” figures are shown as “funded liability” and “trained strength” respectively.

The latest liability figures are as at 1 January 2010. Comparative figures from 1997 are no longer available. The earliest liability data held are as at 1 September 1998.

1 January 2010 figures have been taken from the Army Personnel Statistics Report (APSR). APSR data is derived from the Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) system.

Figures for the Regular Army are as follows:

1 September 19981 January 2010

Organisation

Funded liability

Trained strength1

Funded liability

Trained strength1

Staff

687

710

763

840

Royal Armoured Corps

5,954

5,680

5,772

5,880

Royal Artillery

8,605

8,020

7,476

7,610

Royal Engineers

8,564

8,640

9,529

9,480

Royal Signals

9,101

8,210

8,319

7,570

Infantry

27,242

25,020

24,519

24,720

Army Air Corps

1,669

1,540

2,047

2,140

Royal Army Chaplains Department

144

140

148

140

Royal Logistics Corps

16,240

15,360

15,848

15,170

Royal Army Medical Corps

2,684

2,460

3,190

3,060

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

10,054

9,780

9,820

9,700

Adjutant General’s Corps

Provost

26,915

27,090

1,756

1,700

Staff and Personnel Support

2

2

3,911

3,650

Military Provost Service

2

2

101

100

Educational and Training Services

2

2

344

330

Army Legal Services

2

2

114

120

Unknown3

2

2

0

20

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

174

130

222

330

Small Arms School Corps

138

140

151

150

Royal Army Dentistry Corps

465

350

380

436

Intelligence Corps

1,191

1,130

1,648

1,470

Army Physical Training Corps

388

390

448

490

Queen Alexandra’s Royal Auxiliary Nursing Corps

870

670

1,136

900

Corps of Army Music

1,177

1,060

901

810

1 Trained strength figures are rounded.

2 Indicates brace.

3 These are trained members of the AGC who, due to data input errors in the JPA system, are not allocated to a sub Regimental Corps.

“Fit for Task” has been interpreted as fit to deploy for any form of duty on deployment, including personnel listed as having limited deployability. Data are calculated from Personnel Unable to Deploy (PUD) which is derived from unit returns and includes Gurkha manpower. As at 1 January 2010, Infantry Fit for Task strength was 20,439. Royal Armoured Corps Fit for Task strength was 4,475. No Fit for Task data are available prior to 2007. Similar figures for other corps are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.