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Poverty

Volume 507: debated on Monday 15 March 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many of those aged 16 to 24 years old were classed as living in poverty in each financial year since 1996-97. (313162)

In response to the recession, the Government have put in place significant additional support for young people through the Young Person's Guarantee and Backing Young Britain campaign. In December 2009, we published ‘Investing in Potential’, the cross-Government strategy to increase the proportion of 16 to 24-year-olds in education, employment and training.

For young people claiming jobseeker's allowance the New Deal has helped almost 900,000 people into work. Independent evaluation found that without New Deal, there would be twice as many young people claiming jobseeker's allowance for six months or more than at present.

The requested information is given in the following table, for periods where data are available.

16 to 24-year-olds living in households with less than 60 per cent. of contemporary median income, 1996-97 to 2007-08

Before housing costs

Million

Percentage

Great Britain

1996-97

1.2

19

1997-98

1.1

18

1998-99

1.0

17

1999-2000

1.1

19

2000-01

1.1

18

2001-02

1.1

18

United Kingdom

2002-03

1.2

18

2003-04

1.1

18

2004-05

1.2

17

2005-06

1.4

20

2006-07

1.3

18

2007-08

1.4

19

Notes:

1. These statistics are based on Households Below Average Income, sourced from the Family Resources Survey. Both of these documents are available in the Library.

2. Small changes should be treated with caution as these will be affected by sampling error and variability in non-response.

3. The reference period for Households Below Average Income figures are single financial years.

4. Figures are for the United Kingdom from 2002-03 onwards. Earlier years are for Great Britain only, as such there is a slight discontinuity between the figures pre-and post-2002-03.

5. The income measures used to derive the estimates shown employ the same methodology as the Department for Work and Pensions publication ‘Households Below Average Income’ (HBAI) series, which uses disposable household income, adjusted (or ‘equivalised’) for household size and composition, as an income measure as a proxy for standard of living.

6. For the Households Below Average Income series, incomes have been equivalised using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) equivalisation factors.

7. Number and percent of 16 to 24-year-olds in low-income households have been rounded to the nearest hundred thousand individuals, or whole percentage point respectively.

Source:

Households Below Average Income, DWP