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Cabinet Office

Volume 507: debated on Monday 15 March 2010

Married People

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many married couples (a) are both over the age of 65, (b) are both in work, (c) are living apart, (d) have no children and (e) have one or more children under the age of five; and if she will make a statement.

[Official Report, 18 January 2010, Vol. 504, c. 51-52W.]

Letter of correction from Angela E. Smith:

Errors have been identified in the response given to the hon. Member for Yeovil (Mr. Laws) on 18 January 2010. Table 1 relating to the number of married couples is incorrect. Additionally, the figure of 5,270 married couples who live in a household where all adults are in employment is missing from the table.

The original response given was as follows: (310671)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated January 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on how many married couples (a) are both over the age of 65, (b) are both in work, (c) are living apart, (d) have no children and (e) have one or more children under the age of five; and if she will make a statement. (310671)

The latest, available information requested is given in the table attached. The figures are from ONS's Annual Population Survey (APS) household datasets for the period January to December 2008. Information on the number of couples living apart is not collected and is therefore not presented.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty as different samples could give different results.

Table:1 Number of married couples1 by various characteristics, United Kingdom, January to December 2008

Number of people (thousand)

Number of married couples

12,170

of whom

both are over the age of 65

2,060

both are in employment

5,270

have no children

6,040

have one or more children under the age of five

1,730

1 Excludes cohabiting and same sex couples.

Source:

APS household datasets (ONS).

The correct answer should have been:

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated January 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on how many married couples (a) are both over the age of 65, (b) are both in work, (c) are living apart, (d) have no children and (e) have one or more children under the age of five; and if she will make a statement. (310671)

The latest, available information requested is given in the table attached. The figures are from ONS's Annual Population Survey (APS) household datasets for the period January to December 2008. Information on the number of couples living apart is not collected and is therefore not presented. As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty as different samples could give different results.

Table 1: Number of married couples1 by various characteristics,United Kingdom, January to December 2008

Thousands

Previous

Number of married couples

12,170

of whom

both are over the age of 65

2,060

both are in employment

6,220

live in a household where all adults are in employment

5,270

have no children

6,040

have one or more children under the age of five

1,730

1 Excludes cohabiting and same sex couples

Source:

APS Household datasets

Death: Cancer

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what the age-standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98; (317707)

(2) how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98.

[Official Report, 22 February 2010, Vol. 506, c. 159W.]

Letter of correction from Angela E. Smith:

Errors have been identified in the response given to the hon. Member for South-West Norfolk (Christopher Fraser) on 22 February 2010. Table 1, which related to breast cancer, should not have been included in the original answer, which related to prostate cancer and Table 4 was missing from the answer.

The original response given was as follows:

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent questions asking (1) what the age-standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98 (317707) and (2) how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98. (317708)

The tables attached provide:

(1) The age-standardised mortality rate per 100,000 population, where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, for (a) England, for the years 1997 to 2008 (the latest year available) (Table 1), (b) primary care organisations in England, for the years 2001 to 2008 (the only period available) (Table 2), and (c) parliamentary constituencies in England, for the years 2001 to 2007 (the only period available) (Table 3).

(2) The number of deaths where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, for (a) England and (b) primary care organisations in England, for the years 1997 to 2008 (the latest year available) (Tables 4 and 5), and (c) parliamentary constituencies in England, for the years 1997-02 and 2003-08 combined (the only periods available) (Table 6).

A copy of Tables 2, 3, 5 and 6 have been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Mortality rates for primary care organisations and parliamentary constituencies can only be calculated for the periods given due to the availability of mid-year population estimates. Numbers of deaths for parliamentary constituencies have not been given for individual years in line with the current ONS policy on protecting confidentiality within birth and death statistics.

Table 1: Number of deaths where breast cancer was the underlying cause of death, England and Wales, 20081, 2, 3

Cause of death

Deaths (persons)

Breast cancer

10,779

1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C50.

2 Figures for England and Wales include deaths of non-residents.

3 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

The correct answer should have been:

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated February 2010:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent questions asking (1) what the age-standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98 (317707) and (2) how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (a) England, (b) each primary care trust area and (c) each constituency in each year since 1997-98. (317708)

The tables attached provide:

(1) The age-standardised mortality rate per 100,000 population, where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, for (a) England, for the years 1997 to 2008 (the latest year available) (Table 1), (b) primary care organisations in England, for the years 2001 to 2008 (the only period available) (Table 2), and (c) parliamentary constituencies in England, for the years 2001 to 2007 (the only period available) (Table 3).

(2) The number of deaths where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, for (a) England and (b) primary care organisations in England, for the years 1997 to 2008 (the latest year available) (Tables 4 and 5), and (c) parliamentary constituencies in England, for the years 1997-02 and 2003-08 combined (the only periods available) (Table 6).

A copy of Tables 2, 3, 5 and 6 have been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Mortality rates for primary care organisations and parliamentary constituencies can only be calculated for the periods given due to the availability of mid-year population estimates. Numbers of deaths for parliamentary constituencies have not been given for individual years in line with the current ONS policy on protecting confidentiality within birth and death statistics.

Table 1. Age-standardised mortality rates per 100,000 population, where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, England, 1997 to 20081,2,3,4,5

Deaths (males)

Year

Rate per 100,000 population

1997

28

1998

28

1999

27

2000

26

2001

27

2002

27

2003

27

2004

26

2005

26

2006

25

2007

25

2008

24

1 Age-standardised mortality rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population. Age-standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.

2 Cause of death for prostate cancer was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 185 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C61 from 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.

3 Based on boundaries as of 2009.

4 Figures for England exclude deaths of non-residents.

5 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.

Table 4. Number of deaths where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death, England, 1997 to 20081,2,3,4

Males

Year

Deaths

1997

7,982

1998

8,074

1999

8,015

2000

7,761

2001

8,305

2002

8,471

2003

8,570

2004

8,531

2005

8,492

2006

8,506

2007

8,659

2008

8,597

1 Cause of death for prostate cancer was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code 185 for the years 1997 to 2000, and Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code C61 from 2001 onwards. The introduction of ICD-10 in 2001 means that the numbers of deaths from this cause before 2001 are not completely comparable with later years.

2 Based on boundaries as of 2009.

3 Figures for England exclude deaths of non-residents.

4 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.