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Antisocial Behaviour: York

Volume 507: debated on Tuesday 16 March 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many curfew orders have been issued by courts in York since the introduction of such orders; and how many of those people have been proceeded against for breaching them. (322095)

The available information is provided in the following table.

The data presented in the table are for curfew orders (under Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000 Section 37) given in York courts to offenders as a sentence. Data are not held centrally for the number of curfews issued by courts as part of other sentences such as the requirements of community orders under the Criminal Justice Act 2003 Section 177 or other Acts. Data are not held centrally for the number of curfews ordered as a condition of bail.

Due to data quality issues we are unable to provide information on breaches. Work is currently under way to resolve this.

For information purposes: the data which have been provided do not include local child curfew schemes (set up under the powers provided by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and sections 48 and 49 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 which has been repealed by the Police and Crime Act 2009).

Total curfew orders1 issued in criminal courts in York, all offences, 1998 to 2008

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Crown court

1

1

5

2

3

1

2

Magistrates court

1

4

13

25

19

36

36

43

1 Curfew orders under s.38 of the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000. These figures do not include community orders imposed with a curfew requirement. The magistrates court data include the adult and youth court.

Notes:

1. These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system.

2. These data are presented on the principal offence basis. Where an offender has been sentenced for more than one offence the principal offence is the one for which the heaviest sentence was imposed. Where the same sentence has been imposed for two or more offences the principal offence is the one for which the statutory maximum is most severe.

Source:

Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings database