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Diabetes

Volume 508: debated on Wednesday 24 March 2010

To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of children in each age group who were diagnosed with diabetes in (a) Southend, (b) each borough in Essex, (c) each borough in Kent, (d) the Metropolitan police area of London and (e) England in each of the last five years. (323117)

The data requested are not collected in the requested format. However, ‘Growing Up with Diabetes: Children and Young People with Diabetes in England’ reported that in February 2009 there were 22,947 people aged 0 to 17 years in England with diabetes and 2,052 people aged between 0 to 17 years in the East of England Strategic Health Authority (SHA) with diabetes.

The following table shows all types of diabetes by age in the East of England Strategic Health Authority (SHA).

Total types of diabetes

Age (years)

SHA

0-4

5-9

10-14

15

16

17

Total

0-17 population

East of England

81

383

866

250

238

234

2,052

1,226,621

London

151

497

1039

266

266

233

2,452

1,627,757

South East Coast

97

446

1103

267

353

233

2,499

924,546

The survey did not collect data on people aged 18 and over and data are only available by SHA.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) males and (b) females in each age group were diagnosed with diabetes in (i) Southend, (ii) each borough in Essex, (iii) each borough in Kent, (iv) the Metropolitan police area of London and (v) England in each of the last five years. (323118)

Data are not collected in the format requested. Data from the Quality and Outcome Framework (QOF) about the number of people recorded on diabetes registers are available for NHS organisations. However, it is not possible to separate the data by gender or by age.

Table 1 presents data for Southend PCT for the years 2004-05 and 2005-06 but in October 2006 this PCT was abolished and became part of South East Essex.

Table 1—Southend PCT

Number

2004-05

5,193

2005-06

5,786

Table 2 presents data for the current PCTs in Essex with figures for years in which there was a different structure summed to the current structure.

Table 2—PCTs in Essex

Mid Essex

North East Essex

South East Essex1

South West Essex

West Essex

Total

2004-05

11,007

10,542

10,439

12,390

8,729

53,107

2005-06

11,932

11,537

11,549

13,797

9,295

58,110

2006-07

12,405

12,433

12,499

14,298

9,713

61,348

2007-08

12,926

13,117

13,678

15,543

10,284

65,548

2008-09

14,041

13,948

14,574

16,530

11,051

70,144

1 PCT figures includes figures for Southend PCT from previous table.

Table 3 shows data for the current PCTs in Kent with figures for years in which there was a different structure summed to the current structure.

Table 3—PCTs in Kent

Medway

Eastern and Coastal Kent

West Kent

Total

2004-05

8,919

26,133

21,040

56,092

2005-06

9,667

27,821

22,139

59,627

2006-07

10,377

28,913

23,082

62,372

2007-08

11,562

31,182

24,666

67,410

2008-09

12,583

33,374

26,145

72,102

Table 4 provides data for the London strategic health authority with figures for previous structures summed to the current area.

Table 4—London

Number

2004-05

278,527

2005-06

295,877

2006-07

300,567

2007-08

320,577

2008-09

337,561

Table 5 provides data for England.

Table 5—England

Number

2004-05

1,766,391

2005-06

1,890,663

2006-07

1,961,976

2007-08

2,088,335

2008-09

2,213,138

To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has made an estimate of the number of people with diabetes who were hospitalised as a result of (a) eating and (b) drinking products labelled sugar-free which included sucrose or other sugar products in the last 12 months; whether he has had recent discussions with food manufacturers on the accuracy of information on the sugar content of foods; and if he will make a statement. (323119)

Data are not available from either Hospital Episode Statistics or the National Diabetes Audit to identify people hospitalised as a result of eating or drinking products labelled sugar-free which included sucrose or other sugar products.

Officials at the Food Standards Agency have advised that they have not had recent discussions with food manufacturers about the accuracy of the sugar content of foods.

Under the European Union Regulation EC/1924/2006, a claim that a food is sugar-free may only be made where the product contains no more than 0.5 g of sugars per 100 g or 100 ml. It is the responsibility of local authorities to enforce the EU regulations.