Cookies: We use cookies to give you the best possible experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
House of Commons Hansard
x
25 March 2010
Volume 508
The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many incidents of self-harm by (a) women, (b) men, (c) children under 18 years old and (d) children under 10 years old requiring medical treatment there were at each immigration removal centre in the UK in each of the last six years; [321099]

(2) how many incidents of self-harm by (a) women, (b) men, (c) children under 18 years old and (d) children under 10 years old were recorded at each immigration removal centre in the UK in each of the last six years.

The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

We do not record centrally every incident of self harm, only those incidents where medical treatment was required. The figures represent the total in each financial year for when data was available for Immigration Removal Centres.

Number

2009-101

2145

2008-09

174

2007-08

163

2006-07

197

2005-06

232

1 Includes figures for Brook House Immigration Removal Centre which opened towards the end of March 2009.

2 As at the end of January

There are over 2,500 people in removal centres at any one time. In 2009, we published for the first time, data on the number of people entering detention. In 2009-10 to the end of January, 20,805 people came into immigration removal centres.

This data is normally used for management information only and is not subject to the detailed checks that apply for national statistics publications. It is provisional and subject to change. Published national statistics on the number of adults and children held in detention solely under Immigration Act powers on a snapshot basis are published quarterly and are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office's Research, Development and Statistics website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html

We take the safety of those in our care very seriously, and operate a system called Assessment Care in Detention and Teamwork (ACDT) to identify and help those who are at risk of suicide or self harm. Notices in various languages are displayed around Centres setting out that, where there is a concern about a fellow detainee, this should be brought to the attention of a member of staff.

The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hunger strikes were recorded at each immigration removal centre in the UK in each of the last six years; and how many of them involved (a) male parents detained with their children, (b) female parents detained with their children, (c) children aged under 18 years old and (d) children aged under 10 years old. [321101]

The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

There has been inaccurate reporting in the media of a hunger strike at Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre. While a small number of detainees were refusing formal meals from the canteen, we are aware that they have accessed food from the centre's shop, vending machines and social visitors. They were all also drinking.

We only record information on detainees who have missed four consecutive meals, excluding breakfast. Such detainees miss meals for a number of reasons, including fasting due to their religious faith. We do not record the number who state they are refusing food in protest at a particular issue.

All those who miss meals are monitored closely by the centre, including health care, where they will receive advice on diet and welfare issues.

The UK Border Agency and the Centre management engage closely with such detainees to understand the reason for them missing meals and to seek to resolve any underlying problems.