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Petitions

Volume 514: debated on Monday 26 July 2010

Petitions

Monday 26 July 2010

OBSERVATIONS

Health

Intensive Care (West Sussex)

The Petition of Mrs J Puttick and residents of the Bognor Regis and Littlehampton constituency and others,

Declares that the Petitioners believe that care received by Mr Ken Puttick at Worthing Hospital, West Sussex, was appalling and inadequate; further declares that consultants were not available at weekends, leading to delays to necessary medical procedures; further declares that the number of intensive care beds available was insufficient to meet the needs of the patients and to allow the necessary time for rehabilitation; and further declares that the training given to nurses caring for patients was inadequate.

The Petitioners therefore request that the House of Commons urges the Secretary of State for Health to take steps to increase the number of intensive care beds available; to ensure that care for patients is available 24 hours a day and seven days a week; and to improve the training offered to nurses who care for multiple organ failure patients who have been transferred from intensive care units.

And the Petitioners remain, etc.—[Presented by Mr Nick Gibb, Official Report, 6 July 2010; Vol. 513, c. 3P .]

[P000843]

Observations from the Secretary of State for Health:

The issues raised in the petition are local matters for West Sussex Primary Care Trust (PCT) and my Department will bring these to the attention of the Strategic Health Authority, NHS South East Coast.

Home Department

Anti-Social Behaviour (Croydon)

The Petition of the people of New Addington and Fieldway wards,

Declares that they are concerned about numerous cars have been broken into and damaged, while bins have been repeatedly set on fire around Oak Bank.

The Petitioners therefore request that the House of Commons urges the Government to encourage the authorities to introduce improved lighting and an increased police presence in Oak Bank.

And the Petitioners remain, etc.—[Presented by Mr Andrew Pelling, Official Report, 24 March 2010; Vol. 508, c. 349 .]

[P000786]

Observations from the Secretary of State for the Home Department:

The Government are deeply committed to tackling antisocial behaviour in all its forms and have made it a key priority for action at all levels. We all know that antisocial behaviour and crime are stubborn features of our broken society.

We firmly believe that the public have the right to have their concerns about antisocial behaviour promptly tackled by the police and local partners to ensure that people feel safe in their homes and neighbourhoods.

There are a number of powers available to the police, local authorities, social landlords and other front-line practitioners to tackle antisocial behaviour and there is also detailed guidance on how to make full and effective use of them. Warnings, acceptable behaviour contracts (ABCs), fixed penalty notices, enforcement of tenancy agreements, antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs), and injunctions are all tools that could be used to stop antisocial behaviour. There should be no situation in which antisocial behaviour cannot be tackled or victims not supported.

We understand from Croydon Council that action is being taken to address the problem.

Cosmetics Testing on Animals

The Petition of the students of Coloma Convent High School and the people of Croydon,

Declares that cosmetics testing on animals is unethical and should be banned.

The Petitioners therefore request that the House of Commons urges the Government to bring in a bill to outlaw the testing of cosmetics on animals.

And the Petitioners remain, etc.—[Presented by Mr Andrew Pelling, Official Report, 6 April 2010; Vol. 508, c. 944 .]

[P000818]

Observations from the Secretary of State for the Home Department:

In 1997-98, the Government secured a voluntary ban on the testing of cosmetic finished products and ingredients on animals in the United Kingdom. We did this because we believed that there was inadequate justification for using animals given the benefits of these products and the alternative tests available. After 13 years of negotiations, other European Union (EU) countries agreed to the phasing in of a near-total ban on the sale of animal-tested cosmetic products throughout the EU from 2009. The European Cosmetics Directive defines cosmetics to include not only vanity products but also other products such as toothpaste, baby care products and sun cream.

We cannot foresee any circumstances under which we would be prepared to issue licences under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 for testing on cosmetic finished products and ingredients.

Human Trafficking

The Petition of the people of Croydon,

Declares that human trafficking continues to blight our town.

The Petitioners therefore request that the House of Commons urges the Government to use their influence to maintain a dedicated anti-trafficking unit in the Metropolitan Police.

And the Petitioners remain, etc.—[Presented by Mr Andrew Pelling, Official Report, 24 March 2010; Vol. 508, c. 348 .]

[P000783]

Observations from the Secretary of State for the Home Department:

The Government totally condemn the horrendous crime of trafficking people into, out of and within the United Kingdom and are committed to ensuring the UK is a hostile environment for those who seek to profit from this vile trade.

From 1 April 2010, responsibility for tackling human trafficking in London has rested with an expanded Clubs and Vice Unit which is supported by being part of the Specialist Crime Directorate (SCD) of the Metropolitan Police Service. This change will reduce duplication, improve leadership governance, accountability and clarity for partners and victims. The move to SCD will enable an increased focus on organised crime and enable better access and use of that Directorate’s assets in order to improve the response to human trafficking.

Policing (Croydon)

The Petition of people of Croydon,

Declares that the London Borough of Croydon requires a fairer share of police officers in London.

The Petitioners therefore request that the House of Commons urges the Government to take steps to secure a fairer share of London’s police officers for Croydon

And the Petitioners remain, etc.—[Presented by Mr Andrew Pelling, Official Report, 29 March 2010; Vol. 508, c. 604 .]

[P000789]

Observations from the Secretary of State for the Home Department:

On 30 September 2009 the Metropolitan Police Service had 32,904 police officers, 4,637 police community support officers and 13,693 police staff. The Government do not determine the number of police officers that are deployed to Croydon by the Metropolitan Police Service: that is a matter for the Commissioner (Sir Paul Stephenson QPM) and the Metropolitan Police Authority. At the end of March 2010 the Croydon Operational Command Unit had 747 police officers, 173 police community support officers and 75 Special Constables.

The Government understand that decisions about the allocation of resources to the London Borough Operational Command Units is informed by the Metropolitan Police Resource Allocation Formula which is kept under review by the Commissioner and the Metropolitan Police Authority. We have drawn this petition to the attention of the Commissioner and the Metropolitan Police Authority.