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House of Commons Hansard
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Written Statements
04 February 2016
Volume 605

Written Statements

Thursday 4 February 2016

Culture, Media and Sport

General Data Protection Regulation

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My hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (jointly with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport) and Minister for Intellectual Property has made the following written ministerial statement.

This Government have decided not to opt in to the Justice and Home Affairs provision within the EU general data protection regulation (GDPR). Negotiations on the regulation were concluded on 15 December 2015 and a proposed final compromise text was communicated to the European Council on 17 December. The final text for the GDPR is expected to be formally adopted in due course.

The compromise text contained wording in article 43a, which triggers the UK’s opt-in under protocol 21. This article deals with the recognition and enforcement of judgments, and includes content that falls under article 81 (judicial co-operation in civil matters) and article 82 (judicial co-operation in criminal matters) Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, thereby triggering the UK’s JHA opt-in. The text restricts a member state from enforcing a judgment requiring the transfer or disclosure of personal data where there is no international agreement or treaty.

As a result of concerns relating to the integrity of the UK legal system, the UK will not exercise the opt-in to the parts of article 43a which trigger the protocol 21.

[HCWS511]

Defence

Northern Ireland Executive: Gifting of Surplus Accommodation

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I have today laid before Parliament a Ministry of Defence Departmental Minute to advise of the intent to gift up to 59 surplus service family accommodation to the Northern Ireland Executive. This gift forms part of coalition Government’s financial settlement with the Executive and the commitments set out in Building a Prosperous and United Community: One Year On, in which the Government and the Executive set out plans to work together to build on political stability.

It is intended that legal transfer of title will be completed by late spring 2016, with the disposal value of the sites estimated at £3.5 million as at April 2014. Her Majesty’s Treasury has approved the proposal in principle. If after 14 sitting days, no objections to the gift have been received, the transfer will proceed.

In addition to the gift, 605 surplus service family accommodation that cannot be gifted for operational (security and training) reasons inside our existing perimeters; 286 at Aldergrove, 199 at Ballykinler and 120 at Holywood, costing a total of £3.6 million, will be demolished. Enabling works have begun and demolitions will start in late 2016, with the land then being retained for training. The Ministry of Defence will continue to look for surplus properties to gift as part of the shared commitment of the Government and the Executive to take forward plans to build a shared future.

[HCWS509]

Education

Reformed GCSE and A-level Content

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We are reforming GCSEs, AS and A-levels to make sure that they give students the best possible preparation for further and higher education, and for employment. We want new GCSEs to set expectations which match those of the best education systems in the world, with rigorous assessment that provides a reliable measure of students’ achievement. The reforms are extensive and represent a new qualification gold standard.

Schools are now teaching some of the new reformed GCSEs and A-levels, and we have already published reformed subject content for those GCSEs and A-levels to be taught from September 2016. Content for reformed GCSE subjects and for AS and A-level subjects can be found on gov.uk.

The new GCSEs will be more academically demanding and reformed AS and A-levels will better prepare students for undergraduate study.

Today I am publishing revised subject content for some of the GCSEs and AS and A-levels that will be taught in schools from September 2017:

GCSEs in ancient history, classical civilisation, electronics, film studies, media studies and statistics; and

AS and A-levels in accounting, ancient history, archaeology, classical civilisation, electronics, film studies, law and media studies.

Accounting AS and A-level requires students to understand and to apply double entry accounting methods. A greater emphasis is placed on the use of accounting concepts and techniques in the analysis and evaluation of financial information. There is also a better balance between financial and management accounting.

The new ancient history GCSE, and AS and A-levels will require students to study events, individuals, societies, developments and issues drawn from the period 3000 BC to 500 AD. At GCSE students must study the history of at least two societies, at least one of which must be Roman or Greek. At A-level students must study the history of both ancient Rome and ancient Greece. At GCSE students will have to undertake one period study covering at least 50 years, one longer period study covering at least 150 years, and two depth studies focusing on shorter time spans. At A-level students will undertake two period studies of at least 75 years and two depth studies.

The new archaeology AS and A-levels will require students to study two archaeological contexts in depth (one at AS) and what the archaeological evidence can tell us about that society’s social structure, belief system, art and technology. Through two breadth studies (one at AS) students will also study at least three different societies in relation to specific issues such as religion and ritual, or economics and material culture.

The new classical civilisation GCSE, AS and A-levels will require students to study both Roman and Greek civilisation (and their surrounding worlds). All students will now study literature (at least 30% of the GCSE and A-level) and visual/material culture (at least 20% of the GCSE and 15% of the A-level), and at A-level students will also study classical thought. Students will develop their understanding of the classical world through study of the social, historical, and cultural context of the literature and sources selected.

The new electronics GCSE increases the demand of the subject by increasing the breadth and depth of content students are required to study. The new electronics AS and A-levels have improved depth and breadth with new topics such as the principles of semiconductors added. The GCSE, AS and A-level content also includes strengthened mathematical requirements and a detailed list of equations that students will be required to know and understand.

The film studies GCSE, AS and A-levels will require students to study critically recognised, culturally and historically significant films. At GCSE and AS students will study at least six films including at least one British, one non-English language and one independent film and at least one historical film made before 1961. A-level students will study at least 12 films from at least three continents covering pre-1930 to present day, including documentary, experimental and silent film. Overall the content emphasises a more academic approach with greater emphasis on a critical and contextual understanding of film, and at A-level of film theory.

The new law AS and A-level content will ensure students study a greater number of areas of substantive law: at AS one area of public law and one area of private law; and at A-level at least three areas of law. Students also need to study the nature of law including links to moral concepts, how law interacts with society, and the English legal system.

The new media studies GCSE, AS and A-levels will ensure that students have an understanding of the main theoretical concepts underpinning the subject. Students will study media language, representation, media industries, and audiences, and will apply all four of these to at least one audio visual, one print and one online media form. Overall, students will study nine forms of media and all products studied must be culturally, socially and historically significant. The AS and A-level also require students to study a wide range of specified theories and theorists.

The new and more demanding statistics GCSE requires students to study the statistical enquiry cycle and to perform key statistical calculations such as interpercentile range and standard deviation. Students will be required to know and use fundamental formulae, for example to determine Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. New content has been added, such as using collected data and calculated probabilities to determine and interpret risk, and interpreting the characteristics of a binomial distribution.

[HCWS508]

Home Department

Police Grant Report England and Wales 2016-17

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My right hon. Friend the Home Secretary has today laid before the House, “The Police Grant Report (England and Wales) 2016/17” (HC 753). The report sets out, my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary’s determination for 2016-17 of the aggregate amount of grant that she proposes to pay under section 46(2) of the Police Act 1996, and the amount to be paid to the Greater London Authority for the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime.

At the time the provisional police grant report 2016-17 was laid on 17 December 2015 I said that I was also considering whether a limited amount of police capital grant would be reallocated. After careful consideration I have decided that £10.4 million will be reallocated to support police national technology services. This will assist in providing necessary investment in these critical police services.

To assist police and crime commissioners and chief constables with their medium-term financial planning, I have also decided to provide further information on the police funding settlement over the spending review period. Please note that these figures are indicative only. Home Office Ministers will decide on the level of reallocations for each year on an annual basis, but PCCs should assume that these will be broadly in line with those in 2016-17. PCCs should plan on the basis that their direct resource funding—consisting of formula funding, legacy council tax grants, national and international city grants and precept—will remain at broadly flat cash levels when compared with 2015-16, throughout the spending review period.

This statement also includes details of other funding streams that the Home Office, the Department of Communities and Local Government and the Welsh Government intend to provide to the police in 2016-17.

Table 1: The 2015 spending review settlement for the police

15-16* (£m)

16-17

(£m)

17-18

(£m)

18-19

(£m)

19-20

(£m)

Change

(£m)

Cash change

(%)

Real change

(%)

Government funding (excl CT)

8,271

8,378

8,497

8,631

8,785

514

6.2%

-1.4%

o/w Home Office

8,099

8,204

8,321

8,453

8,604

506

6.2%

-1.4%

o/w DCLG

37

37

37

37

37

0

0.0%

-7.2%

o/w Welsh Government

135

137

139

141

143

8

6.2%

-1.4%

Precept

3,105

3,194

3,286

3,379

3,474

369

11.9%

3.8%

Total

11,376

11,572

11,783

12,010

12,259

883

7.8%

0.0%

*Central Government funding includes Airwave which has been brought into the police settlement and council tax freeze grant amounts which were not known at the time of the 2015-16 annual police settlement.

Table 2: Indicative breakdown of the 2015 spending review settlement

£m

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Total central Government funding*

8,355

8,461

8,583

8,725

o/w ESMCP

80

175

160

55

o/w Police transformation fund and other reallocations (including Airwave and PFI)

491

545

725

1,017

o/w Direct funding

7,784

7,741

7,698

7,653

Precept**

3,194

3,286

3,379

3,474

Overall resource funding***

10,978

11,026

11,076

11,127

*These figures include baseline adjustments for HMIC and NCA.

**Assumes a tax base increase of 0.5%. These figures are based on conservative tax base growth assumptions used at the time of the spending review announcement. These will be updated over time in line with the latest projections from the Office for Budget Responsibility. Figures assume that all PCCs maximise their precept up to the 2%/£5 referendum limit in each year and PCCs in Wales increase precept by 2% each year. These figures assume the 10 PCCs in the lower quartile receiving this additional flexibility remain the same as in 2016-17.

***Direct resource funding consists of formula funding, NICC grants, legacy council tax grants and precept.

Note: figures may not sum due to rounding.

Table 3: Police revenue funding 2016-17

Police funding

16-17

£m

Central Government funding*

8,995

o/w CT Police Grant**

640

o/w Airwave

204

o/w Police Private Finance Initiatives

73

o/w Legacy Council Tax Grants

545

Overall core Government settlement funding

7,534

Reallocations

218

o/w Direct Entry

4.6

o/w Emergency Services Network

80

o/w Independent Police Complaints Commission (for the transfer of integrity functions)

32

o/w Innovation Fund

55

o/w Major Programmes (HOB and NPDP)

21.8

o/w Special Grant

25

Transformation Fund

76

Total direct Government funding

7,239

Government formula funding

7,061

cash change

-41

cash change percentage from 15-16

-0.6%

real change percentage

-2.3 %

National and international Capital City Grants

178

o/w City of London Police

4.5

o/w Metropolitan Police

173.6

Precept

3,194

Overall resource funding***

10,978

cash change

51

cash change percentage

0.5%

real cut

-1.2%

* includes £14 million baseline adjustment for NCA in 2016-17. A separate baseline transfer has been applied for HMIC.

** Additional capital of £30 million will be provided for CT policing.

***Comprises formula funding, NICC grants, legacy council tax grants and precept.

Detail of Police Transformation Funds (totals indicative)

Transformation fund

76.4

o/w new transformation funding

37.8

o/w Firearms

34

o/w Digital justice (CJS)/digital investigations (DII)

4.6

Table 4: Police Capital 2016-17

2015-16 Police Capital

£m

Police Capital Grant

54.1

Special Grant Capital

1

National Police Air Service

16.5

Police Live Services

10.4

Total

82

Table 5: Revenue allocations for England and Wales 2016-17

2016-17

Local Policing Body

HO core (including Rule 1)

Welsh Top-up

WG

Ex-DCLGFormula Funding

Legacy CouncilTax Grants (total from HO)

£m

Avon and Somerset

105.0

-

-

56.5

14.7

Bedfordshire

40.3

-

-

23.3

4.6

Cambridgeshire

48.5

-

-

24.4

6.5

Cheshire

61.5

-

-

44.8

8.3

City of London

18.4

-

-

33.6

0.1

Cleveland

46.2

-

-

38.5

7.7

Cumbria

28.7

-

-

30.8

4.8

Derbyshire

62.1

-

-

37.7

8.7

Devon and Cornwall

102.7

-

-

63.1

15.5

Dorset

41.2

-

-

17.3

7.9

Durham

42.7

-

-

37.0

6.1

Dyfed-Powys

32.1

5.1

12.9

-

-

Essex

102.8

-

-

55.9

13.1

Gloucestershire

34.4

-

-

19.5

6.1

Greater London Authority

861.5

-

-

749.8

119.7

Greater Manchester

226.6

-

-

181.4

25.7

Gwent

42.4

-

30.1

-

-

Hampshire

120.0

-

-

63.1

12.9

Hertfordshire

71.4

-

-

36.4

10.2

Humberside

67.2

-

-

46.6

10.0

Kent

106.3

-

-

66.6

13.3

Lancashire

100.6

-

-

79.2

12.8

Leicestershire

65.3

-

-

39.6

8.9

Lincolnshire

38.4

-

-

20.3

6.8

Merseyside

122.5

-

-

112.8

15.6

Norfolk

50.2

-

-

28.8

9.3

North Wales

46.3

4.9

21.6

-

-

North Yorkshire

41.7

-

-

27.0

7.9

Northamptonshire

43.2

-

-

24.2

6.6

Northumbria

110.1

-

-

107.4

8.2

Nottinghamshire

77.9

-

-

48.1

9.7

South Wales

87.5

-

72.2

-

-

South Yorkshire

100.6

-

-

77.5

10.9

Staffordshire

66.5

-

-

39.9

12.0

Suffolk

40.7

-

-

22.9

6.8

Surrey

62.2

-

-

29.2

9.2

Sussex

97.8

-

-

53.9

13.2

Thames Valley

141.2

-

-

73.9

15.3

Warwickshire

31.0

-

-

17.4

5.2

West Mercia

66.3

-

-

43.4

12.0

West Midlands

250.8

-

-

180.3

19.0

West Yorkshire

171.5

-

-

129.3

16.7

Wiltshire

37.5

-

-

20.7

5.2

Total England and Wales

4,112.0

9.9

136.8

2,802.2

507.4

Table 6: Change in total direct resource funding*

Force Area

2015-16

2016-17

Cash change

£m

£m

£m

%

Avon and Somerset

269.3

270.7

1.4

0.5%

Bedfordshire

99.6

100.0

0.4

0.4%

Cambridgeshire

128.1

128.9

0.8

0.6%

Cheshire

169.5

170.9

1.4

0.8%

City of London

55.4

56.8

1.4

2.5%

Cleveland

122.3

122.5

0.3

0.2%

Cumbria

99.2

99.7

0.5

0.5%

Derbyshire

160.7

161.4

0.7

0.4%

Devon and Cornwall

278.0

279.5

1.5

0.5%

Dorset

118.4

119.3

1.0

0.8%

Durham

112.5

112.7

0.2

0.2%

Dyfed-Powys

93.3

94.1

0.8

0.8%

Essex

260.8

263.4

2.5

1.0%

Gloucestershire

104.3

105.1

0.8

0.8%

Greater London Authority

2,517.4

2,522.4

5.0

0.2%

Greater Manchester

541.2

542.9

1.7%

0.3%

Gwent

117.8

118.5

0.7

0.6%

Hampshire

299.1

300.6

1.5

0.5%

Hertfordshire

181.1

182.9

1.8

1.0%

Humberside

169.4

169.8

0.5

0.3%

Kent

273.1

275.5

2.4

0.9%

Lancashire

258.9

259.5

0.6

0.2%

Leicestershire

167.7

168.5

0.7

0.4%

Lincolnshire

108.4

109.1

0.7

0.7%

Merseyside

307.0

307.0

0.0

0.0%

Norfolk

145.5

146.5

1.0

0.7%

North Wales

139.8

141.1

1.3

0.9%

North Yorkshire

137.1

138.2

1.1

0.8%

Northamptonshire

119.2

119.9

0.7

0.6%

Northumbria

259.5

260.3

0.8

0.3%

Nottinghamshire

188.9

189.5

0.6

0.3%

South Wales

255.1

256.5

1.5

0.6%

South Yorkshire

239.1

240.0

0.9

0.4%

Staffordshire

176.7

177.6

0.8

0.5%

Suffolk

110.9

111.6

0.6

0.6%

Surrey

205.0

207.1

2.1

1.0%

Sussex

249.7

252.1

2.5

1.0%

Thames Valley

369.7

371.9

2.2

0.6%

Warwickshire

89.5

90.1

0.6

0.7%

West Mercia

198.5

199.8

1.3

0.6%

West Midlands

522.8

524.0

1.2

0.2%

West Yorkshire

404.6

406.3

1.7

0.4%

Wiltshire

102.8

103.5

0.6

0.6%

Total

10,927.0

10,977.8

50.8

0.5%

*This includes all formula grant, NICC grants and legacy council tax grants and police precept. This assumes that PCCs in England increase their precept to the maximum referendum limit in 2016-17, PCCs in Wales raise council tax by 2% and tax base growth of 0.5% across England and Wales.

Table 7: Capital allowances for England and Wales 2016-17

Local Policing Body

2016-17

£m

Avon and Somerset

1.2

Bedfordshire

0.5

Cambridgeshire

0.6

Cheshire

0.8

City of London

0.4

Cleveland

0.6

Cumbria

0.4

Derbyshire

0.7

Devon and Cornwall

1.3

Dorset

0.5

Durham

0.6

Dyfed-Powys

0.4

Essex

1.1

Gloucestershire

0.4

Greater Manchester

2.7

Gwent

0.5

Hampshire

1.4

Hertfordshire

0.7

Humberside

0.8

Kent

1.3

Lancashire

1.3

Leicestershire

0.8

Lincolnshire

0.5

Merseyside

1.6

Metropolitan

14.3

Norfolk

0.6

North Wales

0.5

North Yorkshire

0.5

Northamptonshire

0.5

Northumbria

1.5

Nottinghamshire

0.9

South Wales

1.1

South Yorkshire

1.3

Staffordshire

0.8

Suffolk

0.5

Surrey

0.7

Sussex

1.1

Thames Valley

1.7

Warwickshire

0.5

West Mercia

0.9

West Midlands

2.9

West Yorkshire

2.1

Wiltshire

0.5

Total

54.1

[HCWS510]