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House of Commons Hansard
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24 July 2018
Volume 645

Defence Industry and Shipbuilding

The following is an extract from the Opposition day debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding on 11 July 2018.

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Returning to ships and the role of the maritime sector, we should remind ourselves of the significant changes to the Royal Navy fleet. We have two incredible aircraft carriers coming into service, a new generation of Dreadnought-class submarines, the Type 45 destroyers—the most advanced in the world—and the new Type 26 global combat ships. We also have the Type 31e frigates—e for export—which have deliberately been designed with a modular concept. Depending on the export need, which could be interdiction, surface support or humanitarian purposes, its parts can be interchanged simply to adapt to the local requirement. This is an exciting time, and all the ships will be built in the United Kingdom.

[Official Report, 11 July 2018, Vol. 644, c. 1042.]

Letter of correction from Tobias Ellwood:

An error has been identified in my response to the debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding.

The correct response should have been:

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Returning to ships and the role of the maritime sector, we should remind ourselves of the significant changes to the Royal Navy fleet. We have two incredible aircraft carriers coming into service, a new generation of Dreadnought-class submarines, the Type 45 destroyers—the most advanced in the world—and the new Type 26 global combat ships. We also have the Type 31e frigates—e for export—which have deliberately been designed with a modular concept. Depending on the export need, which could be interdiction, surface support or humanitarian purposes, its parts can be interchanged simply to adapt to the local requirement. This is an exciting time, and all the UK ships will be built in the United Kingdom.

The following is an extract from the Opposition day debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding on 11 July 2018.

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Our new shipbuilding strategy sets out exactly how we can achieve such a marine sector. We will continue to build Royal Navy ships only in the UK while encouraging international collaboration in harnessing open competition for other naval ships. Our new framework will ensure that the impact of UK prosperity will be considered as part of our procurement decisions.

[Official Report, 11 July 2018, Vol. 644, c. 1044.]

Letter of correction from Tobias Ellwood:

An error has been identified in my response to the debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding.

The correct response should have been:

The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

Our new shipbuilding strategy sets out exactly how we can achieve such a marine sector. We will continue to build Royal Navy warships only in the UK while encouraging international collaboration in harnessing open competition for other naval ships. Our new framework will ensure that the impact of UK prosperity will be considered as part of our procurement decisions.

The following is an extract from the Opposition day debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding on 11 July 2018.

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Thirdly, we want to focus on building exports, where there is an opportunity, as the Type 31 will be the first frigate for export since the 1970s. We know that more sales can cut costs in procurement over time and give us the potential to buy even more cutting-edge ships.

[Official Report, 11 July 2018, Vol. 644, c. 1045.]

Letter of correction from Tobias Ellwood:

An error has been identified in my response to the debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding.

The correct response should have been:

The edit just sent has not been saved. The following error was returned:
This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

Thirdly, we want to focus on building exports, where there is an opportunity, as the Type 31 will be the first frigate built with exports in mind. We know that more sales can cut costs in procurement over time and give us the potential to buy even more cutting-edge ships.

The following is an extract from the Opposition day debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding on 11 July 2018.

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I may have misunderstood the Minister, and I know it is not the custom to ask a question to which one does not know the answer, but I think he said that Royal Naval ships were confined to aircraft carriers, frigates and destroyers. Would that not also apply to any replacement amphibious craft that we might need?

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My hon. Friend is absolutely right—that would be considered royal naval class, so not manned by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

It is important that, as we move forward, we look closely at value for taxpayers’ money.

[Official Report, 11 July 2018, Vol. 644, c. 1045-46.]

Letter of correction from Tobias Ellwood:

An error has been identified in my response to my hon. Friend the Member for North Thanet (Sir Roger Gale) during the debate on Defence Industry and Shipbuilding.

The correct response should have been:

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This content has already been edited and is awaiting review.

That would be considered royal naval class, so not manned by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

It is important that, as we move forward, we look closely at value for taxpayers’ money.