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Ministerial Corrections

Volume 708: debated on Tuesday 1 February 2022

Ministerial Correction

Tuesday 1 February 2022

Justice

Judicial Review and Courts Bill

The following is an extract from proceedings on Report of the Judicial Review and Courts Bill on 25 January 2022.

I also support this amendment and the efforts being made by my hon. Friend’s Department and across Government to increase the ability of magistrates to hear and deliver justice. Can he confirm that, through this Bill, the raising of the magistrates’ retirement age from 70 to 75 will include those who have already been forced to retire at 70, so that, where there is local demand, they can come back and serve some of the justice that we now want to see being brought forward?

My hon. Friend makes an excellent point, because, of course, we do want to achieve precisely that. Just to be clear, it is not in this Bill. It is in the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill that is going through at the same time—I spoke on its Second Reading. The key point, as my hon. Friend has said, is that it raises the mandatory retirement age to 75, and we think that that will have a significant impact. In fact, we have estimated that it could lead to 400 additional magistrates coming in at a time when we really need that resource because of the backlog.

[Official Report, 25 January 2022, Vol. 707, c. 929.]

Letter of correction from the Under-Secretary of State for Justice, the hon. Member for South Suffolk (James Cartlidge):

Errors have been identified in the answer I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Eddisbury (Edward Timpson) on Report of the Judicial Review and Courts Bill.

The correct response should have been:

My hon. Friend makes an excellent point, because, of course, we do want to achieve precisely that. Just to be clear, it is not in this Bill. It is in the Public Service Pensions and Judicial Offices Bill that is going through at the same time—I spoke on its Second Reading. The key point, as my hon. Friend has said, is that it raises the mandatory retirement age to 75, and we think that that will have a significant impact. In fact, we have estimated that it could retain 2,000 magistrates annually at a time when we really need that resource because of the backlog.