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Written Answers

Volume 597: debated on Thursday 25 February 1999

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Written Answers

Thursday, 25th February, 1999.

Nato Dialogue With Mediterranean Partners

asked Her Majesty's Government:What proposals they will make at the April 1999 NATO Summit Meeting in Washington for the alliance to enhance the quality of its Mediterranean dialogue, with particular reference to future risks from weapons of mass destruction, ballistic missiles and terrorism. [HL981]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
(Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean)

NATO's member states and Mediterranean partners are free to raise any issue which can further security and stability in the Mediterranean region, including weapons of mass destruction, ballistic missiles and terrorism. The Washington Summit will consider proposals to increase the frequency of multilateral and bilateral contacts between NATO and its Mediterranean partners and to expand the range of military activities in the work programme.

Gibraltar: British Residents

asked Her Majesty's Government:How many British citizens are currently resident in Gibraltar. [HL1020]

According to the latest available figures (1997) there are 24, 787 British nationals resident in Gibraltar.

Eu Enlargement

asked Her Majesty's Government:Further to the Answer given by the Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean on 9 February (H. L. Deb., cols. 100–101), whether they have carried out any objective research as to whether it would be in the interests of the Central and Eastern European countries to have full membership of the European Union; and (b) whether in so doing they have considered the arguments advanced in the book,

The Poisoned Chalice. [HL1073]

Enlargement is in the interest of the whole of Europe, including the current member states and the applicant states. It will not only reinforce peace, stability, democracy and freedom, but create the largest single market for trade and investment in the world. But, as I underlined in the Lords on 9 February, it is for the applicants themselves to judge if it is in their interest to join the European Union. The current applicant states have judged in favour of accession to the European Union. We are confident that the benefits of enlargement will significantly outweigh the costs.Publications like

A Coming Home or a Poisoned Chalice have helpfully identified a number of the practical difficulties that will need to be addressed to make enlargement a success. We do not share the authors' pessimism about the enlargement process, but accept the necessity of avoiding any kind of second class of membership and of dealing with EU reforms before the first accessions.

International Conflict: Causes

asked Her Majesty's Government:Further to the debate on 26 November 1998 (H. L. Deb., cols. 196 and 220–230), whether they consider that conflict is more likely to be provoked (a) by democratic nations, or (b) within conglomerations of disparate states, especially when the ties which have bound them together are loosened. [HL1074]

The causes of conflict are varied and complex. However, the Government believe that violent conflict is inherently less likely to be provoked within, by or between democratic countries. This is one of the reasons why the Government attach importance to their work, both bilaterally and in multilateral fora, to build and strengthen democratic values and institutions.

Malacca Strait: Chinese Military Activity

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they have received any information on increased Chinese military activity near the Malacca Strait.[HL I 076]

We are not aware of any increased military activity by China near the Malacca Strait.

British Council Grants To Artists Scheme

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was the amount of funding of the British Council's Grants to Artists Scheme for each of the financial years 1988–89 to 1997–98. [HL1075]

Figures for the amount of funding for the British Council's Grants to Artists Scheme for the years requested are only readily available from Financial Year 1993–94. The figures from that year to 1997–98 are as follows:

  • 1993–94: £54, 434
  • 1994–95: £98, 480
  • 1995–96: £85, 665
  • 1996–97: £127, 568
  • 1997–98: £120, 618

Turkey

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was their response to the appeal to all European governments by the Prime Minister of Italy urging them to seek a peaceful political solution to the long-standing war in south-east Turkey and adjoining areas. [HL994]Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: I refer the noble Lord to the Answers I gave in the House on 3 December 1998 in reply to questions from the noble Lords, Lord Rea and Lord Hylton (H. L. Deb., cols. 598–600).

asked Her Majesty's Government:What action they will take in the Council of Europe if the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of

Loizidou v. Turkey is not enforced. [HL995]

Responsibility for implementing the judgment in Loizidou v. Turkey lies with Turkey. We take such responsibilities seriously, as with all obligations in the Council of Europe, and expect other members to do likewise. We have reminded Turkey in the Committee of Ministers of these responsibilities, most recently on 9 February, and will continue to do so. We have made clear to Turkey the need to respect the Court's judgment. Turkey has confirmed its wish to uphold the authority of the European Court of Human Rights.

Togo: Banning Of Female Genital Mutilation

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will make an official response to the Government of Togo on their campaign (including a legal ban) against female genital mutilation. [HL1013]

This Government welcome the Government of Togo's initiative to abolish female genital mutilation and will be following it up with the Togolese authorities. We regularly look for opportunities to condemn this custom, which we see as a form of violence against women and an abuse of human rights. We are actively supporting programmes which work towards the eradication of this practice.

Gibraltar: Fishing Agreement

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will outline the agreement. made in October 1998, between the Spanish Foreign Minister and the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, regarding fishing within British sovereign waters in the Bay of Gibraltar and ratified by the Prime Minister and the Spanish Prime Minister. [HL1053]

On 5 October 1998, my right honourable friend the Foreign Secretary reached an understanding with the Spanish Foreign Minister on the situation that prevailed in British waters around Gibraltar from 1991–97, when fishing took place in moderation and the fisherman respected the authority of the Gibraltar law enforcement agencies. They agreed that we should revert to that situation.

Anglo-Spanish Ministerial Meetings

asked Her Majesty's Government:What are the dates for the forthcoming meetings between the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and the Spanish Foreign Minister and likewise the date for the proposed meeting between the Prime Minister and the Spanish Prime Minister. [HL1054]

The Foreign Secretary met the Spanish Foreign Minister on 21 February. They agreed that officials would meet to prepare for a further meeting. No dates have been fixed, although the two Ministers see each other regularly in the course of EU business.The Prime Minister hopes to see the Spanish Prime Minister on 25 February in Germany in the context of the informal meeting of Heads of Government to discuss Agenda 2000.

European Union: Forthcoming Council Business

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will list the forthcoming business in the Council of the European Union for March; and list the major European Union events for the next six months. [HL1258]

See below.

Monthly Forecast of Business: March 1999
DateLocationEvent
March 1999
4BrusselsPolitical Committee
8–12StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
9BrusselsSocial Affairs Council

Monthly Forecast of Business: March 1999

Date

Location

Event

11–12BrusselsEnvironment Council
12BrusselsJustice & Home Affairs Council
13–14ReinhartshausenForeign Ministers (Informal)
15BrusselsECOFIN
15–16BrusselsAgriculture Council
22BrusselsPolitical Committee
22–23BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
24–25BerlinSpecial European Council
26BrusselsK4 Committee
22–23BrusselsEuropean Parliamentary Plenary
29BrusselsTransport Council
29–30BerlinAsia-Europe Foreign Ministers
30BrusselsFisheries Council
The following subjects are likely to be discussed:
4BrusselsPolitical Committee
No agenda yet available
8–12StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
No agenda yet available
9BrusselsSocial Affairs Council
Dialogue with acceding countries on social issues
Directive on employee involvement in the Société Européen
Political agreement
Decision on the Standing Committee on Employment
Adoption
Code of Conduct on co-operation between authorities in the case of transnational hiring-out of workers and combating benefit fraud and illegal work
Adoption of Resolution
Proposal for Directives on the organisation of working time:
Progress report from the Presidency
11–12BrusselsEnvironment Council
Proposal for a Council Directive on end-of-life vehicles:
Common position
Amended proposal for a Council Directive establishing a framework for Community action in the field of auto policy:
Common position
Community strategy on climate change:
Council conclusions
Preparation of the 7th session of the Commission on Sustainable development (CSD) (19–30 April 1999):
Council conclusions
Proposal for a Council regulation allowing voluntary participation by organisations in a community eco-management and audit system:
Policy debate
Proposal for a Council Directive amending Directive 88/609/EEC:
Policy debate
Incineration Directives:
Policy debate
Commission report on progress in accession negotiations in the environment sector:
Commission report
12BrusselsJustice & Home Affairs Council (Possible)
Adoption of the agenda
Europol, pension fund
Europol activities report 1998
Europol: draft Council act adopting the rules governing the transmission of personal data by Europol to 3rd states and 3rd bodies

Monthly Forecast of Business: March 1999

Date

Location

Event

Europol: draft decision of the Council instructing Europol to deal with forgery of money and means of payments
Europol: preparation of the taking-up of activities EURODAC: draft Council act drawing up a protocol extending the scope ratione personae of the Convention concerning the establishment of "EURODAC" for the comparison of fingerprints of applicants for asylum
Drugs: decision on MBDB
Joint position on the EU-Convention on organised crime
Draft explanatory report on the Second Protocol to the Convention on the protection of the European Communities' financial interests
Convention on Mutual Legal Assistance in criminal matters
Questions relating to the transition from the Maastricht to the Amsterdam treaty with regard to conventions
Revision of the Conventions of Brussels and Lugano
Information on some ongoing activities in the field of internal market and consumer protection Preparation of the meeting with CEECs and Cyprus
Definition and integration of the Schengen Aquis (information by the Presidency)
Any other business
13–14Reinhartshausen Foreign Ministers (Informal) No Formal Agenda
15BrusselsECOFIN
AGENDA 2000
Financial Framework
Institutional agreement
Report on own resources
(Possible) Stability and Growth pack: examination of stability and convergence programmes
Report of the European Court of Auditors for the financial year 1997:
Presentation of report
Recommendation on discharge and statement of assurance
Follow-up to Vienna European Council:
Duty Free Sales
(Possible) Taxes:
Taxation of interest income
Interim report on the discussions with third countries
Energy taxation
Progress report
(Possible) Euro 11
Multilateral monitoring and co-ordination of economic policy
15–16BrusselsAgricultural Council
No agenda yet available
22BrusselsPolitical Committee
22–23BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
Agenda 2000: Preparation of Special European Council (24 and 25 March, Brussels)
(Possible) Enlargement
Common Strategies
Mediterranean policy:
Situation/Prospect of TEP negotiations
EU-Latin America Summit:
Progress of preparations
EU-ASEAN relations:
Preparation of meeting of Foreign Ministers (25 March)

Monthly Forecast of Business: March 1999

Date

Location

Event

ASEM
Preparation of meeting of Foreign Ministers (30 March)
Western Balkans
European security and defence policy
24–25BerlinSpecial European Council
Agenda not yet available
24–25BrusselsEuropean Parliament Plenary
Agenda not yet available
29BrusselsTransport Council

Land Transport

Proposals for Council Directive amendments:
Policy debate
Proposal for the amendment of: Directive 92/106/EEC & 96/53
Political agreement
Communication on the organisation of working time in the sectors and activities excluded from Directive 93/104/EC
Policy debate
Commission report on the use of buses and coaches of up to 15 metres in length Council conclusions
Possible agreement on the transits of lorries through Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria Political agreement on the draft text

Air Transport

Mandate for the revision of the Warsaw convention on uniform rules on the transport of cargo in international air transport
Agreement on the granting of the mandate to the Commission
Proposal for a regulation amending Regulation 295/91
Adoption of the common position
Commission report on air transport and environment
Debate

All Transport Modes

Report on a proposal for the amendment of Decision 1692/96/EC
Debate
Global navigation satellite system (GNSS)
Commission proposal expected at the beginning of 1999—debate
Negotiations between the EC and Switzerland on land and air transport
Conclusion of the agreement
Political agreement on the implementation of the agreement
29–30BerlinAsia-Europe Foreign Ministers
Agenda not yet available
30BrusselsFisheries Council
Proposal for Council regulation laying down the detailed rules and arrangements regarding community structural assistance in the fisheries sector
Policy debate
Proposal for a Council regulation establishing a list of serious infringements in the context of the control system (Regulation (EEC) 2847/93) applicable to the common fishery policy
Policy debate
Proposals to amend Council regulation (EC) 850/96
Final adoption
Proposals opening and providing for the administration of autonomous community tariff quotas for certain fisheries products

Monthly Forecast of Business: March 1999

Date

Location

Event

Final adoption
Proposal for a Council Regulation on the collection of basic fisheries data
Presentation by the Commission and initial debate

This calendar is primarily concerned with European Union matters, but certain other relevant events are also included. Events and dates quoted are based on the information available on the date of issue.

European Calendar: March—August 1999

Date

Location

Event

March 1999

4BrusselsPolitical Committee
8–12StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
9BrusselsSocial Affairs Council
11–12BrusselsEnvironment Council
12BrusselsJustice & Home Affairs Council
13–14ReinhartshausenForeign Ministers (informal)
15BrusselsECOFIN
15–16BrusselsAgriculture Council
22BrusselsPolitical Committee
22–23BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
22–23BrusselsEuropean Parliament Plenary
24–25BerlinSpecial European Council
26BrusselsK4 Committee
29BrusselsTransport Council
29–30BerlinAsia-Europe Foreign Ministers
30BrusselsFisheries Council

April 1999

8BrusselsPolitical Committee
12–16StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
13LuxembourgConsumer Affairs Council
15–16StuttgartEuro-Med Foreign Ministers Conference "Barcelona III"
16–18DresdenECOFIN (informal)
19–20LuxembourgAgriculture Council
20BrusselsPolitical Committee
22LuxembourgTelecommunications Council
23–25MecklenburgEnvironment Ministers (Informal) (TBC)
24–25LuxembourgNATO Summit
26LuxembourgPolitical Committee
26–27LuxembourgGeneral Affairs Council
29LuxembourgIndustry Council
29–30BrusselsK4 Committee

May 1999

3–7StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
6–7BerlinPolitical Committee
6BrusselsEU-ACP Ministerial meeting
7–9MecklenburgEnvironment Ministers (informal) (TBC)
10BrusselsECOFIN
10BremenWEU Council
10–11BerlinTrade Ministers (informal)
11BrusselsEnergy Council
17BrusselsK4 Committee
17BrusselsPolitical Committee
17–18BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
17–18BrusselsAgriculture Council
18BrusselsEEA Council
18BrusselsCo-operation Council with Russia
18–19WeimarCulture Ministers (informal)
20BrusselsResearch Council
21BrusselsDevelopment Council

European Calendar: March—August 1999

Date

Location

Event

25BrusselsJoint ECOFIN and Labour & Social Affairs Council
25BrusselsSocial Affairs Council
25BrusselsPolitical Committee
27BrusselsYouth Council
27–28BrusselsJustice & Home Affairs Council
31BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
30 May–1 JuneDresdenAgriculture Ministers (informal)

June 1999

1DresdenAgriculture Ministers (informal)
3–4CologneEuropean Council
7LuxembourgEducation Council
8LuxembourgHealth Council
10BrusselsPolitical Committee
10LuxembourgFisheries Council
10–13European Parliament Elections
14LuxembourgECOFIN (possible)
14–15LuxembourgAgriculture Council
14–15BrusselsK4 Committee
17BonnEU-Japan Summit
17–18LuxembourgTransport Council
18–20CologneG8
21LuxembourgInternal Market
21BonnEU/USA/Canada Summit
21–22LuxembourgGeneral Affairs Council
22LuxembourgLabour & Social Affairs Council (possible)
24–25LuxembourgEnvironment Council
25–29Rio de JaneiroEU-Latin America/Caribbean Summit
28LuxembourgCulture Council
29BrusselsPolitical Committee (possible)

July 1999

2–3OuluIndustry and Research Ministers (informal)
6–7SavonlinnaCulture Ministers
8HameenlinnaPolitical Committee
9–10OuluLabour/Social Affairs Ministers (informal)
12BrusselsECOFIN
16BrusselsBudget
16–18HelsinkiEnvironment Ministers (informal)
18–20SavonlinnaCulture/Audiovisual Ministers (informal)
19BrusselsPolitical Committee
19–20BrusselsGeneral Affairs Council
20–23StrasbourgEuropean Parliament Plenary
22–23HelsinkiK4 Committee

August 1999

No Council Business

Tax Exempt Savings Accounts

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they can confirm that under a first TESSA it is impossible to invest less than £3, 000, but that this will not apply in the case of ISAs. [HL1051]

There is no such restriction. The Regulations for TESSAs and ISAs each set maximum amounts which can be saved in a year. In the case of a first TESSA, this maximum is £3, 000 for the first year. The regulations do not set a minimum contribution limit, although some providers may set minimum limits for particular accounts.

The Mall: Closure

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether it is with their approval that the Royal Parks Agency has closed the Mall for three month; [HL1027]Whether the Royal Parks Agency (RPA) consulted (a) the Palace of Westminster authorities and (b) Westminster City Council over the closure of the Mall for three months and the consequent congestion in Whitehall and Parliament Square; and whether the RPA is to reimburse the relevant police authorities for the extra work involved in dealing with the disturbance to normal traffic, or the bus companies whose schedules are being disrupted; and [HL1028]Whether the closure of the Mall was professionally planned by an outside agency; if so, by whom; and at what cost. [HL1029]

Programming of works within the Royal Parks is an operational matter for the Royal Parks Agency (RPA); the approval of Ministers for the closure of the Mall was not required.In planning the works on the Mall, which involve resurfacing the road and carrying out safety improvements at accident blackspots, the RPA consulted Westminster City Council, as the local highway authority, and the Metropolitan Police. In accordance with their advice, the RPA has sought to concentrate works in the shortest period in order to minimise disruption to traffic, and this requires total closure for three weeks. The Palace of Westminster authorities were not consulted. No payments are made to police authorities or bus companies for traffic disruption arising from essential roadworks.Tarmac Services are the agency's works management contractor and professional advisors, appointed to carry out maintenance works to the hard fabric of the Royal Parks. For the Mall roadworks, Tarmac appointed Peter Brett Associates as specialist traffic management consultants. Their fees are estimated at £49, 000.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether there are any Buddhists or Hindus amongst the civil servants reporting to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. [HL948]

The deparment does not record the number of Buddhists or Hindus among its staff.

Royal Parks: Concerts

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether the organisation of commercial concerts is compatible with the duty of the Royal Parks Agency and of the commitments of the Government to protect the parks from commercialisation. [HL1026]

Yes. The Government consider that the increased number of events being planned for 1999 will add to the attractions of the parks for very many visitors and will, in conjunction with the Government's increased public funding of the Royal Parks Agency announced by my right honourable friend the Secretary of State on 14 December 1998, enable the Royal Parks Agency better to maintain and enhance the parks for the benefit of all visitors.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether tickets for the twelve concerts which the Royal Parks Agency (RPA) is allowing to be mounted in Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens throughout the summer months are to cost £35, with tickets for corporate guests at £130 per head; how many tickets are to be on sale; how they arc being marketed; and what proportion of the returns will go to the RPA and what proportion to the commercial organisers of these events. [HL1025]

Responsibility for the subject of this question has been delegated to the Royal Parks Agency under its Chief Executive, Mr. David Welch. I have asked him to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter to Lord Kennet from the Head of Policy of the Royal Parks Agency, Ms Viviane Robertson, dated 25 February 1999.

In the absence of the Chief Executive, Mr. David Welch. I have been asked by the Secretary of State for Culture. Media and Sport to reply to your parliamentary Question about ticket prices for concerts in Hyde Park this summer.

Ninety-six thousand, five hundred tickets, at a maximum price of £17.50, will go on sale for the concert in aid of the Prince's Trust. There will also be up to 3, 500 corporate hospitality tickets, the prices for which are expected to range from £90 to £225.

For the nine concerts to be held in July, the price of tickets has been fixed at a maximum of £35 per head. The number of tickets to go on sale will not exceed 16, 500, plus 1, 000 corporate hospitality tickets for each concert. The price of the latter will be fixed at a maximum of £130 per head.

Ticket prices for the Proms in the Parks concert have not yet been fixed but are expected to be no more than £12.50 per head. The maximum number will be 40, 000, with an expected 1, 000 corporate hospitality tickets. A concert for children is also proposed but no details have been agreed.

With the exception of the Proms in the Park concert, which we negotiate ourselves, our Marketing Partner negotiates the fees for the above concerts on our behalf. The fee charged to the event organiser/promoter is based on a number of factors, including the length of time an area of the park is in use, the number of tickets sold—although a minimum fee may be set—and whether video/television recordings are permitted. Seventy-two per cent. of the fee comes to the Agency and our Marketing Partner retains 28 per cent.

Tickets for all concerts are available from ticket agents.

Protection Of Wrecks

asked Her Majesty's Government:How many staff are employed within the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on the administration of the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973; how many of these are (a) full-time and (b) trained in heritage management: and what steps are taken to ensure some continuity of experience in the administration of this legislation. [HL886]

Four members of staff in the department are involved in day to day administration of the Protection of Wrecks Act 1973 as one of a number of heritage-related responsibilities. None has been specifically trained in heritage management, but all have a background in providing general policy advice to Ministers. In carrying out administration of the 1973 Act, officials act on the expert advice of the Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck Sites and the Archaeological Diving Unit, which is contracted to the department to report on the suitability of wreck sites for designation under the Act. Officials also have at their disposal complete records relating to previous administration of the Act and policy on underwater archaeology, together with sets of desk instructions, to ensure continuity. The Departmental Spending Review proposal to give English Heritage additional powers with regard to underwater archaeology is designed to address the concern that policy should be undertaken by heritage professionals rather than civil servants.

House Of Lords: Tendering Procedure

asked the Chairman of Committees:Further to his Written Answer on 2 February (

WA 187–88), whether the tendering procedure in the House of Lords is subject to the same restrictions and penalties as those imposed on local government. [HL 1133]

The Public Works Contracts Regulations 1991 apply to both the House of Lords and local authorities.

Scottish Parliament: Brussels Office

asked Her Majesty's Government:What consultation took place and with which interested parties before it was decided to establish a permanent presence in Brussels representing the Scottish Parliament and Scottish Office; and [HL1045]What are the primary function and purpose of Scotland House in Brussels; and what new functions will attach to Scotland House not currently carried out in the European Community by Her Majesty's Government; and [HL1046]How many staff will be permanently based in Scotland House in Brussels; and what will be the designations of the posts, the salary grading of each post and the total salary and wage costs; and [HL1047]Whether the services provided by the proposed Scotland House in Brussels will be available to Members of both Houses of the Westminster Parliament; and [HLI048]What will be the initial cost of furnishing and equipping Scotland House in Brussels; and [HL1049]What is the anticipated annual cost of maintaining Scotland House in Brussels; and [HLI050]Whether Scotland House in Brussels will be based in a purchased or rented property; and what is the anticipated cost attaching to either option; [HL1088] andWhether costs incurred by Scotland House in Brussels will be borne solely by the Scottish Office or whether some costs will be borne by other Departments; and, if so, which. [HL1089]

There are no plans to open an office to represent the Scottish Parliament in Brussels. That possibility will be a matter for consideration by the parliament itself.The White Paper

Scotland's Parliament, published in July 1997, made reference to the possibility of establishing a representative office for the Scottish Executive in Brussels.

My honourable friend the Minister for Housing, Transport and European Affairs announced on 30 March 1998 that two Scottish Office officials would be posted to the UK Permanent Representation building in Brussels to examine the options for establishing such a presence.

My right honourable friend announced on 9 February that arrangements are now in hand to establish a representative office for the Scottish Executive, to be in operation when the Executive and Parliament assume their full powers on 1 July 1999. The office will co-locate with Scotland Europa, and the term "Scotland House" covers the combined presence, rather than the Executive's office alone. The precise functions of that office will be determined by the Scottish Executive in due course.

Officials spoke extensively to MEPS, members of the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee, CoSLA, Scotland Europa members, other regional offices in Brussels, Permanent Representations (including staff in the UK Permanent Representation), and staff in EU institutions to asses what services an office of the Scottish Executive in Brussels could provide, and how best it could work.

If the office is to be in operation by 1 July, staff have to be recruited and accommodation identified over the next few weeks. The plans announced by my right honourable friend on 9 February envisage six members of staff, four of whom will be Scottish Office officials, at the following grades:

  • 1 Senior Civil Servant
  • 1 official at Band CI (formerly Principal grade)
  • 2 officials at Band B2/BFS (formerly HEO/HEO(D)); and
  • 2 locally employed staff.

Final costs for the establishment of the office and the running costs thereafter cannot be confirmed until staff have been identified and accommodation has been agreed. However the provisional budget identifies a net additional cost of £500, 000 in 1999–00 and £480, 000 in each financial year thereafter (estimated rental costs are included within these figures). These sums will come from the Scottish Consolidated Fund, and will not, overall, involve any increase in public expenditure.

Scotland: School Class Numbers

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is, by individual school and local authority, the average number of pupils per primary school class in Scotland. [HL1036]

Since the information requested is rather lengthy, I am arranging to have copies placed in the Library.

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is, by individual school and local authority, the average number of pupils per secondary school class in Scotland. [HL1037]

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is the current number of primary school classes in Scotland with over 30 pupils. [HL1038]

The most recent figures are from the schools census carried out in September 1997 when 2, 679 publicly-funded primary school classes had more than 30 pupils. Figures for 1998 are not available yet.

asked Her Majesty's Government:How many primary school classes in Scotland had over 30 pupils in May. [HL1039]

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is the average class size for primary years 1, 2 and 3 by school in each local authority area in Scotland. [HL1040]

As the information requested is rather lengthy, I am arranging to have copies placed in the Library.

Scotland: Primary School Teacher Numbers

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was the total number of primary school teachers in Scotland in each year since 1992. [HLI041]

The number of full-time equivalent teachers in primary schools in Scotland for each year since 1992–93 is set out in the table below.

1992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971997–98
22, 74822, 47322, 49522, 55022, 48322, 189

House Of Lords Reform

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is the largest number of hereditary Peers by succession who would still have seats in this House by the end of October this year, if the Parliament No. 2 Bill had received Royal Assent at the last Royal Commission of the Session, on 22 October 1969. [HL958]

According to Clause 1(1) of the Bill as presented in the House of Commons, the holder by succession of an hereditary peerage would not have been eligible to receive a writ of summons after the commencement of the Act (that is, at the end of that parliamentary Session on 25 October 1969). Any hereditary Peer who was either in receipt of a writ of summons in right of a peerage at the commencement of the Act or was eligible to apply and had applied for a writ within six months of the commencement could remain a member of the House, Clause 1(2)). Two hundred and fifty-five hereditary Peers by succession would thus still have seats in the House at present. This includes 224 hereditary Peers who were in receipt of writs at the end of the Session on 25 October 1969 and 31 who would have been eligible for a writ on that date. The provisions in the Bill relating to Peers over the age of 72 do not apply to hereditary Peers because they are not deemed to be "voting peers" under Clause 3 of the Bill.

Lay Interviewers For Judicial Office

asked Her Majesty's Government:What are the names, occupations and qualifications of those lay interviewers who are involved in assessing applicants for judicial office. up to and including Circuit Judges. [HL1069]

The attached table lists the current lay interviewers who are involved in the assessment of candidates for judicial office up to and including Circuit Judges and their occupations as stated at the time of their appointment. Details of their formal qualifications are not required as part of the selection process.

Lord Chancellor's Department Lay Interviewers
NameOccupation
Annie AndersonHousewife
Kodavoor Ramachandra Aithal JPCompany Director
Eileen Vera Baglin-Jones JPEducation Officer, Oxfordshire County Council
David Graham BarrettRetired Local Government Official
Bernard William James Baxter JPRetired Headteacher
Alison Helen BernaysSelf-employed in farming and Rural Tourism
Colin Leonard Bird JPScientist, IBM UK Laboratories
Stuart Paul Blakey JPRetired Personnel Manager
Leonora Angela Evike Brydon JPRetired Headteacher
Stella Clarke JPDirector of Catering Company
Susan Elizabeth Clarke JPDirector of Automation Systems Company
Dr. John Philip Davies JPRetired Headteacher
Dr. Elspeth Clarkson JPConsultant Pathologist
Gillian Charity Cooper JPCompany/General Secretary
Dr. Jill Diprose JPCommunity Paediatrician
Gordon Dixon JPRetired Personnel Manager
Cecily Sarah EdenDirector Health Promotion, Birmingham CHT
Henry Elwes JPLord-Lieutenant of Gloucestershire
Brain Edward Evans JPRetired Senior Engineer, East Midlands Electrictity
Reverend Barbara Fletcher JPRetired Librarian and Part-Time Minister
Douglas John Green MBE JPRetired Marketing Services Manager
Susan Elizabeth GreenCommunity and Mental Health Trust worker
Margaret Hazel Henley JPRetired Training Scheme Manager
Alan Anderson HepburnDirector of Employee Relations, Jaguar Cars
Wendy Elizabeth Hickling JPChairman. Fosse Health Trust
Pamela Doreen Homer JPNursing Director
Elizabeth Margaret Innes JPHousewife
Anthony Clifford Owen James JPSecurity & Emergency Services Manager
Winfhrop Bismarck Jones JPRetired Head of Dental Services
Brenda Jane Macaskill JPRetired Social Worker
Elizabeth Angela Mason JPPR for St. John's Ambulance
Leo Murphy JPHeadteacher
Dr. Sandra Valerie Isabella Naik JPMedical Practitioner, Jessop Hospital for Women
Rosalind Jane Neary JPRetired Dental Therapist
Deirdre Morag Newham JPBusiness Counsellor
Susan Norton JPAssistant Staff Manager, John Lewis
Phyllis Doreen Parfitt JPRetired Computer Operator

Lord Chancellor's Department Lay Interviewers

Name

Occupation

Rita Ann Piepe JPSenior University Accommodation Officer
Carola Forsteen Ramsden JPHousewife
Dr Raj K. Raja RayanDental Practitioner
Dr. Julie Ruth Richardson JPCourse Tutor, Open University
Diane Mary Shepherd JPManagement Consultant
David Hall Smith JPRetired Headteacher
Peter Simpson JPCompany Managing Director & Business Consultant
David Tempest JPPersonnel & Training Manager
Kathrin Elizabeth Thomas JPChairman Bro Taf Health Authority
Robert John Williams JPPrincipal St. Aidans College, Durham University
Judith Sonia May Worthington JPCo-ordinator of Adult Training & Education

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will set out the criteria that are used in selecting lay interviewers from the members of the Lord Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Justices of the Peace. [HL1070]

The lay interviewers have been selected from among the Chairmen and members of the Lord Chancellor's Advisory Committees on Justices of the Peace who consider candidates for appointment to the lay magistracy and accordingly have experience of both interviewing and the judicial process. Individuals have been considered for appointment as lay interviewers against the following criteria in particular:well-developed skills of assessing people;sufficient knowledge of the judicial system to carry credibility;understanding of the impact of the judicial system on all types of court-user;credibility with the profession and with individual candidates.Account has also been taken of the desirability of maintaining a broad balance within the panel in terms of factors such as gender, ethnic origin and geographical location.

Lords Of Appeal In Ordinary

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they consider that Lords of Appeal in Ordinary have any conflict of interests arising from their dual judicial and legislative roles in the House of Lords. [HL1071]

The Lords of Appeal in Ordinary are members of the House of Lords both in its legislative and its judicial capacities. That membership does not give rise to any conflict of interest. The Law Lords' contributions to debates on the administration of justice are highly valued by the House. While participating in debate, however, it is prudent for them to abstain from concluded views of a judicial character on issues, arising out of legislation or otherwise, which might give rise to a risk of disqualifying them later from ruling judicially on those very issues.

Crown Prosecution Service

asked Her Majesty's Government:What progress is being made with their plans to reform the Crown Prosecution Service. [HL1072]

Good progress is being made in the reform of the CPS. On 30 November 1998, the Attorney General gave an interim government response to the recommendations of the Glidewell Review of the service, which reported in June 1998. Fifty-three recommendations have now been accepted, considered or noted. Twenty-two recommendations remain under consideration. A copy of the response is in the Library of the House. The restructuring of the CPS to 42 areas and the appointment of 42 new Chief Crown Prosecutors will take effect from April 1999.

Gun Owners: Insurance

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they have any plans to legislate for mandatory insurance for firearms licence holders and shotgun certificate holders, and owners of low powered airguns and air pistols.[HL1166]

The Government believe it is for individual shooters to take out any insurance they consider necessary to cover actions for which they may become liable. We have no plans at present to introduce legislation to make this compulsory.

Airguns: Licensing Policy

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they have any plans to legislate for the inclusion of low-powered airguns and air pistols in the firearms licensing scheme. [HL1167]

The Government have no plans at present to introduce legislation to require the certification of low-powered air guns. There are already laws in place to control the use and possession of these guns and we shall keep under close scrutiny the way in which they are used. In particular we have asked the Firearms Consultative Committee to look at the existing controls as part of their 1999 work programme.

Great Western Railway Line: Modernisation

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the report by Railtrack, part funded by the European Commission's Trans European Networks programme, into the potential for upgrading the main railway line into Devon and Cornwall for passenger and freight traffic. [HL1148]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
(Lord Whitty)

A copy of the Railtrack Summary Report of the feasibility study for the modernisation of the Great Western Line from London to the South West has today been placed in the Library of the House.

Bilateral Aid

asked Her Majesty's Government:What of the cash plans allocations for 1998–99 have been allocated to (a) governmental bodies in developing countries and (b) to non-governmental organisations. [HL1121]

We do not set budgets by the institution used to channel development assistance; we are increasingly focusing our efforts on outputs. Retrospective analyses of bilateral expenditure through UK non-governmental organisations are published annually in Statistics on International Development, which is available in the Library of this House.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they will list recipient projects and the funds allocated to them by the United Kingdom bilateral aid budget towards sound policies and pro-poor economic growth in 1998–99 in Uganda. [HLI124]

All projects under the bilateral aid budget in Uganda are designed to promote sound policies and/or pro-poor economic growth. In November of last year a list of all active projects in Uganda (and India) was deposited in the Libraries of both Houses, in response to a question in another place from the honourable Member for South West Devon to my right honourable Friend the Secretary of State for International Development. The list details the name of each project and the funds committed to each for the entire life of the project.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Which projects received what funds from the United Kingdom aid budget towards good governance in (a) 1997–98 and (b) 1998–99. [HL1137]

Information on policy targeting is available from DFIDs Policy Information System (PIMS) for bilateral projects with a commitment value of £100, 000 or more. PIMS covers around 70 per cent. of bilateral expenditure only. On 1 April 1998, the definition of good government changed to exclude human rights, which are now covered separately in an extended definition which includes economic and social rights as well as civil and political rights. For comparison purposes, the attached listing therefore includes all projects which targeted good government as a principal policy objective in 1997–98 and those which targeted either good governance or human rights as a principal policy objective in 1998–99 to date.

Projects marked Principal for Human Rights: 1998–99
CountryProject/Programme TitleCommitment
Asia RegionalPaticipatory Action Research with Migrant Children and Youth245, 000
BangladeshCommunity Development II350, 000
ChinaChina: Shanghai Foster Care and Training Project621, 016
ColombiaCivil Conflict (New PHS)149, 905
GhanaWSIP Water Sector Improvement Sector4, 065, 000
HPD Individual ContractsUK Financial Contribution to the Population Council200, 000
IndiaSupport to ILO for the Elimination of Child Poverty2, 500, 000
IndonesiaComplimentary Feeding Programme1, 250, 000
MozambiqueNational Child Rights Programme128, 350
RwandaICRC Detainee Protection Activities in Rwanda350, 000
South Africa, Republic ofSupport to the South African San Institute (SASI) and the SA535, 500
UgandaDisabled People121, 450
ZambiaZambia Primary Reading Programme10, 205, 000

asked Her Majesty's Government:In view of the commitment to eradicate poverty, how they explain that the share of the Department for International Development's bilateral aid (excluding emergency aid) to low income countries has declined by 3.6 per cent. between 1996–97 and 1997–98. [HL1141]

For 1997–98, DfID was bound by the financial ceilings fixed by the previous administration. DfID inherited a programme which declined in cash terms in 1997–98 over the previous year. During 1997–98, DfID reviewed and refocused all programmes to ensure they met our new objectives. The Comprehensive Spending Review announced in July 1998 set out the Government's spending plans for 1999–00 to 2001–02 and reversed the decline in development spending.Within this context, the fall in the proportion of aid going to low income countries in 1997–98 was due to two specific factors:increased expenditure in South Africa and Montserrat. Both are classified as upper-middle income countries, but DfID programmes address important needs and focus on the poorer elements of those communities.a relatively small decrease in the value of aid going to low income countries.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Which projects received what funds from the United Kingdom bilateral aid budget towards providing clean and safe water to poor people in (a) 1997–98 and (b) 1998–99. [HL1140]

In 1997–98 the total Department for International Development (DfID) expenditure on water-related projects was £49.9 million. Of this, £30.3 million went to support rural and urban water supply and sanitation initiatives; an eight per cent. increase over 1996–97. Figures for 1998–99 are not yet available, although, based on projects recently approved for funding, we are expecting an increase.In all, approximately 150 projects received DfID funding in 1997–98. In terms of financial value, the allocation was 56 per cent. in Africa (notably Ghana, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Nigeria, Swaziland); 34 per cent. in South Asia (India. Nepal, Bangladesh, Pakistan) and the remaining 10 per cent. allocated between South America, Middle East and Eastern Europe. Some 7 per cent. of the funds were used to support the implementation of projects through civil society organisations.

Water Management

asked Her Majesty's Government:What were the results of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development 1998 meeting on fresh water management. [HL1138]

The Commission on Sustainable Development reaffirmed that water resources are essential for satisfying basic human needs, health, food production, energy, the restoration and maintenance of eco-systems, and for social and economic development in general. It recognised the need for fresh water resources development to be planned in an integrated manner, aimed at locally appropriate, people-centred, sustainable development.It highlighted the importance of the management and use of water to contribute to the eradication of poverty and promotion of food security as a particularly important goal. The Commission recognised the important task for the United Nations agencies and programmes and other international bodies in helping developing countries to develop and implement their integrated water resources management, and protection, programmes and policies.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether the commitment to "adopt a comprehensive framework that takes account of impacts of water use on all aspects of social and economic development" (

Eliminating World Poverty, Cm 3789, Panel 5, page 24) has been fulfilled. [HL1139]

The United Nations Programme of Action from the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 sets out priorities for fresh water in Agenda 21 Chapter 18. This highlights the extent to which water resources development contributes to economic productivity and social well-being. It recognised the paramount importance of the holistic management of fresh water as a finite and vulnerable resource, and the integration of sectoral water plans and programmes within the framework of national economic and social policy. The comprehensive framework emerging from Rio has been further developed through the Sixth Session of the Commission for Sustainable Development in 1998.The recommendations from these international fora form the basis for the Department for International Development's (DfID) integrated approach, in which water is considered to be a fundamental development issue linking with three DfID objectives (

Eliminating World Poverty, Panel 3, Page 24), contributing clearly to:

Sustainable livelihoods, in particular through water for food production;

Health, through improved water supply, sanitation and safer hygiene practices;

The environment, through sustainable management of water resources, use of water for ecosystem sand control of pollution.

United Nations Population Fund (Unfpa)

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was the total value of the assistance provided to the United Nations Family Planning Association's programme since 1981. [HL1144]

The UK makes an annual core contribution to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to enable people in poorer countries to have children by choice, and to protect their sexual and reproductive health. A total of £121.7 million has been provided in core grants since 1981, as follows:

DFID Contributions to the UNFPA
Calendar YearContribution
19812, 250, 000
19822, 650, 000
19832, 700, 000
19843, 000, 000
19854, 500, 000
19864, 500, 000
19875, 000, 000
19885, 250, 000
19895, 500, 000
19903, 000, 000
199110, 500, 000
19929, 423, 320
19937, 000, 000
19948, 776, 680
199510, 000, 000
199613, 000, 000
199711, 500, 000
199813, 119, 897
Total 1981–98 (incl.)£121, 700, 000
This does not include occasional direct support to UNFPA from DFID's bilateral programmes (multi-bilateral assistance), notably to procure contraceptive commodities. This information can only be provided at disproportionate cost.

asked Her Majesty's Government:Whether they have made any decisions on funding the United Nations Family Planning Association in view of the quinquennial review of the International Conference on Population and Development. [HL1146]

The quinquennial review is an operational assessment of global progress in implementing the International Conference on Population and Development agreement. The findings of the review will be presented at a Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly from 30 June to 2 July and are expected to highlight the need for more concerted international action to prevent the spread of HIV, reduce maternal mortality and ensure equitable access to sexual and reproductive health services in poorer countries, including contraceptive supplies.National governments are responsible for taking forward the ICPD agenda, in partnership with bilateral and multilateral agencies, including the World Health Organisation, the UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and civil society at large. The review will help to inform future operational activities and spending priorities for all these actors.The UK contribution to UNFPA for 1999–2000 will be announced as usual at the beginning of the financial year. We shall remain among their most significant contributors.

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was the International Planned Parenthood Federation's most recent grant to the China Family Planning Association (CFPA); and what is the total assistance provided to date. [HL1145]

The International Planned Parenthood Federation's grant to its Chinese affiliate for calendar year 1988 was US$637, 800. (This is an actual, not yet audited figure.) Total assistance provided between 1981, when the China Family Planning Association joined the Federation, and 1998 is US$14, 185, 900.

FPA China Grants 1981–98
Year ActualsTotal Grants $'000
1981125, 000
1982196, 100
1983288, 005
1984722, 300
1985794, 600
1986720, 100
1987806, 000
1988920, 000
1989928, 300
19901, 066, 800
1991872, 400
19921, 094, 300
19931, 256, 100
19941, 060, 900
1995764, 900

FPA China Grants 1981–98

Year Actuals

Total Grants $'000

1996903, 900
19971, 027, 900
1998 Actual Not Audited637, 800
Total14, 185, 900

asked Her Majesty's Government:What was the total value of the United Kingdom's most recent contribution to the United Nations Family Planning Association's programme of assistance in China. [HL1143]

The UK makes an annual core contribution to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to enable people in poorer countries to have children by choice, and to protect their sexual and reproductive health. In 1998, the UK core grant to UNFPA was £13, 119, 897. This supports activities in over 150 countries, including China. It is not possible to disaggregate a UK share of UNFPA's China programme.

Insulin Pens

asked Her Majesty's Government:Further to the Written Answer by the Baroness Hayman on 8 December 1998 (

WA 80) on provision of pen needles on prescription for all insulin-dependent diabetics, when the Secretary of State for Health will make his expected decision. [HL988]

My honourable friend the Minister of State at the Department of Health announced today that we hope to allow insulin pen needles and reusable insulin injection pens to be prescribed by general practitioners on the National Health Service. This would be contingent upon the addition of pre-filled, disposable, pens to Schedule 10 to the National Health Service (General Medical Services) Regulations 1992 (the "blacklist"), on which we are consulting interested parties. We are placing a copy of my honourable friend's announcement, and of the consultation letter, in the Library.

Nhs Charges

asked Her Majesty's Government:What plans they have to increase National Health Service charges. [HL1259]

We shall shortly lay before the House regulations to increase National Health Service Charges in England and Wales from 1 April 1999. There will be a cash increase in the charge of 10p, (1.72 per cent.) from £5.80 to £5.90 for each quantity of a drug or appliance dispensed. This means that prescription charges will fall in real teens.The cost of prescription prepayment certificates will rise to £30.80 for a four-month certificate and £84.60 for an annual certificate. These offer savings for those needing more than five items in four months or 14 in one year.Prescription charges are expected to raise some £377 million for the NHS in 1999–2000.Charges for elastic stockings and tights, wigs and most fabric supports supplied through the Hospital Service will be increased similarly.The maximum patient charge for a single course of dental treatment begun on or after 1 April 1999 will increase from £340 to £348. Only about one in every 1, 000 courses of treatment will attract the new maximum charge.The increases are below the current rate of inflation as measured by the retail prices index for January 1999: 2.4 per cent.We will also be laying regulations to increase optical voucher values. Increases range from 2.5 per cent. to 18 per cent., with most help targeted towards people with serious sight problems who are prescribed the most complex, expensive glasses.My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Scotland will lay regulations to increase charges in Scotland by the same amounts. Similar arrangements will apply in Northern Ireland.Details of the revised charges have been placed in the Library.

Pupil Numbers In Maintained Schools

asked Her Majesty's Government:What is, by local education authority, the estimated number of full-time equivalent pupils in all maintained schools for January 1999. [HL1150]

The Minister of State, Department for Education and Employment
(Baroness Blackstone)

The latest available information, for January 1998, is shown in the following table.

Full-time equivalent number of pupils in maintained schools1 England and Each Government Office Region and Local Education Authority area in England
January 1998FTE pupils
England7, 501, 568
North East420, 063
Hartlepool16, 356
Middlesbrough24, 787
Redcar and Cleveland25, 588
Stockton-on-Tees32, 130
Darlington15, 834
Durham79, 211
Northumberland50, 840
Gateshead29, 786
Newcastle-upon-Tyne40, 100
North Tyneside30, 868
South Tyneside25, 650
Sunderland48, 916

Full-time equivalent number of pupils in maintained schools1 England and Each Government Office Region and Local Education Authority area in England

January 1998

FTE pupils

North West & Merseyside

1, 127, 743

North West886, 555
Cheshire158, 901
Cumbria76, 689
Bolton45, 968
Bury28, 999
Manchester69, 796
Oldham41, 398
Rochdale36, 113
Salford36, 590
Stockport43, 024
Tameside37, 575
Trafford35, 468
Wigan50, 338
Lancashire225, 699

Merseyside

241, 188

Knowsley28, 762
Liverpool80, 569
St Helens29, 697
Sefton47, 134
Wirral55, 028

Yorkshire and Humber

805, 264

East Riding of Yorkshire48, 235
City of Kingston-Upon-Hull42, 320
North East Lincolnshire28, 020
North Lincolnshire25, 083
York24, 147
North Yorkshire85, 588
Barnsley33, 959
Doncaster50, 997
Rotherham44, 642
Sheffield73, 090
Bradford86, 829
Calderdale34, 088
Kirklees63, 222
Leeds113, 193
Wakefield51, 855

East Midlands

646, 640

Derby36, 607
Derbyshire110, 329
Leicester City48, 290
Rutland4, 724
Leicestershire91, 662
Lincolnshire95, 613
Northamptonshire101, 634
Nottinghamshire157, 782

West Midlands

867, 420

Hereford and Worcester103, 615
Shropshire64, 136
Stoke39, 779
Staffordshire131, 624
Warwickshire74, 991
Birmingham177, 290
Coventry50, 077
Dudley49, 510
Sandwell50, 854
Solihull36, 086
Walsall48, 185
Wolverhampton41, 275

Eastern

803, 656

Luton30, 499
Bedfordshire61, 516
Cambridgeshire103, 836
Essex237, 509
Hertfordshire164, 727
Norfolk108, 773
Suffolk96, 797

Greater London

1, 003, 748

Inner London

348, 004

City of London201
Camden22, 471

Full-time equivalent number of pupils in maintained schools1 England and Each Government Office Region and Local Education Authority area in England

January 1998

FTE pupils

Hackney25, 346
Hammersmith and Fulham16, 254
Haringey31, 593
Islington24, 065
Kensington and Chelsea10, 372
Lambeth26, 730
Lewisham33, 003
Newham44, 076
Southwark32, 835
Tower Hamlets36, 078
Wandsworth27, 624
Westminster17, 360

Outer London

655, 744

Barking and Dagenham27, 469
Bamet45, 915
Bexley37, 846
Brent36, 140
Bromley44, 073
Croydon46, 850
Ealing40, 798
Enfield45, 349
Greenwich35, 393
Harrow28, 071
Havering35, 792
Hillingdon36, 759
Hounslow34, 216
Kingston-upon-Thames19, 289
Merton22, 830
Redbridge38, 792
Richmond-upon-Thames19, 287
Sutton27, 141
Waltham Forest33, 740

South East

1, 126, 344

Berkshire116, 332
Milton Keynes33, 410
Buckinghamshire72, 567
Brighton & Hove28, 990
East Sussex63, 678
Portsmouth25, 901
Southampton30, 742
Hampshire173, 460
Isle of Wight18, 881
Kent246, 254
Oxfordshire81, 965
Surrey132, 262
West Sussex101, 905

Full-time equivalent number of pupils in maintained schools1 England and Each Government Office Region and Local Education Authority area in England

January 1998

FTE pupils

South West

700, 691

Bath and NE Somerset24, 904
City of Bristol51, 067
North Somerset26, 960
South Gloucestershire38, 581
Cornwall70, 895
Isles of Scilly259
Devon152, 087
Bournemouth20, 751
Poole19, 742
Dorset52, 547
Gloucestershire83, 367
Somerset68, 295
Swindon28, 943
Wiltshire62, 298

1 Includes maintained nursery, primary, middle, secondary and special schools and Pupil Referral.

Dfee Grants To Leas

asked Her Majesty's Government:What grants have been made, and are planned to be made, by the Department for Education and Employment to each local education authority in England and Wales in addition to revenue support grant in 1997–98, 1998–99 and 1999–2000. [HL1184]

Details of the grants, in addition to revenue support grant, made by the Department for Education and Employment, to each local education authority in England in 1997–98 and 1998–99 and planned to be made in 1999–2000 are given in tables that have been placed in the Library. The allocation of the grants for New Deal for Schools and the reduction of class sizes for 1999–2000 has not yet been made. For the Standards Fund, the figures shown include the grant made by the department and the contribution made by the local education authority. Grants to local education authorities in Wales are the responsibility of the Welsh Office.