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Transport: Heavy Goods Vehicles

Volume 704: debated on Wednesday 29 October 2008

asked Her Majesty's Government:

Why the fees payable under the Goods Vehicles (Authorisation for International Journeys) (Fees) Regulations 2008 (SI 2008/1576), having not been uprated since 2004, are increased for five licence types by fewer than 10 per cent, while two are increased by 14.3 per cent and one by 33.3 per cent. [HL5658]

The broad level of increase in the fees payable under the Goods Vehicles (Authorisation for International Journeys) (Fees) Regulations 2008 (SI 2008/1576), resulted because fees are normally rounded to the nearest pound to minimise the effects of customer errors in calculating total payment for multiple applications. High percentage increases, such as 14.3 per cent and 33.3 per cent, are the result of raising low fees by full pounds. Individual fees which have had such high percentage rises in one fee round are less likely to rise in the next review.

asked Her Majesty's Government:

How the fees set by the Goods Vehicles (Authorisation for International Journeys) (Fees) Regulations 2008 (SI 2008/1576) were calculated; and what factors were taken into account in determining the increases. [HL5659]

The fees set by the Goods Vehicles (Authorisation for International Journeys) (Fees) Regulations 2008 (SI 2008/1576) are calculated in line with Treasury policy on fees and charges set out in Managing Public Money and qualified or supplemented by the Department of Transport (Fees) Order 1988 Schedule 1, Table II, item A, and Schedule 2, paragraphs 1 to 7.

asked Her Majesty's Government:

After the proposed registrations come into effect, how many heavy goods vehicles will be on the roads of the United Kingdom which do not comply with the requirement to have an adequate display of mirrors to enable the driver clearly to see cyclists behind or alongside them. [HL5687]

Proposed national legislation which takes effect from March 2009 will require improved mirrors to be fitted to existing large goods vehicles first used from 1 January 2000. From the available vehicle registration statistics the Department for Transport estimates that around 100,000 vehicles will not be required to comply because they were registered prior to January 2000. None the less, we understand that some of these vehicles are already equipped with mirrors that will comply with the new requirements.

asked Her Majesty's Government:

Whether the draft European Union regulation on further implementation of the European satellite navigation programmes (EGNOS and Galileo) will improve the accuracy and reliability of devices used by drivers of heavy goods vehicles. [HL5768]

Regulation 683/2008 on the further implementation of the European satellite navigation programmes (EGNOS and Galileo) entered into force on 24 July 2008. It provides a financial and legal basis for Galileo, which will offer better availability and accuracy than the current generation of GPS. The regulation also provides for the operation of EGNOS, which is designed to enhance and assure the accuracy of GPS signals. It is expected that all users of satellite navigation devices, including drivers of heavy goods vehicles, will see significant benefit from the programmes once complete. However, the availability of specialist software for HGV routing is key and will be a matter for the commercial market to deliver.