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Petitions: Downing Street Website

Volume 707: debated on Friday 6 February 2009

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many petitions have been created on the 10 Downing Street website petition facility since its creation; how many have been rejected; and for what reasons. [HL790]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) what systems are in place for monitoring petitions on the 10 Downing Street website since its creation, and in particular for monitoring (1) how many persons have signed a petition, and (2) how many people have signed each petition in each appropriate range; (b) what systems are in place for dealing with petitions, informing petitioners how their petition is being dealt with, and reporting back on the action taken; and (c) what proportion of petitions have been assessed as achieving any change in policies or the delivery of policy. [HL791]

The No. 10 e-petitions system was established as a means for facilitating greater engagement with the public, giving them an opportunity to make their views known to the Government. They are not referenda and are in no way a legislative substitute for Parliament. An e-petition has no legal status; however, to protect the service from abuse, petitions must satisfy some basic terms and conditions. The terms and conditions are set out on the website at: http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/terms. fifty thousand petitions have been received since its creation.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the terms and conditions of the Number 10 Downing Street e-petition scheme are established by law. [HL818]

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Number 10 Downing Street e-petition scheme is required by law to respond to petitions submitted to it; and, if so, what steps such laws require 10 Downing Street to take by way of providing a response. [HL819]

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is meant by “senior management” as set out in the terms and conditions of the Number 10 Downing Street e-petition scheme; and whether it is defined in law. [HL820]

The Number 10 e-petitions system was established as a means for facilitating greater engagement with the public, giving them an opportunity to make their views known to the Government. They are not referenda and are in no way a legislative substitute for Parliament. An e-petition has no legal status, however to protect the service from abuse petitions must satisfy some basic terms and conditions. The terms and conditions are set out on the website at: http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/terms. 50,000 petitions have been received since creation.