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Embryology

Volume 709: debated on Wednesday 1 April 2009

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Lord Darzi of Denham on 10 February (WA 176) and 23 March (WA 93), whether the 14-day limit applies to all human embryos created in vitro except those that have been cultured for more than 14 days; and, if not, why the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority applies different criteria when classifying various entities resulting from nuclear transfer as embryos in comparison with outgrowing embryos. [HL2488]

No licence from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority permits centres to culture live human embryos beyond 14 days or the appearance of the primitive streak, in accordance with Sections 3(3)(a) and 3(4) of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 23 March (WA 92) regarding the relative contributions of nuclear transfer and induced pluripotent stem cell technology, to what extent each of these technologies has contributed to the generation of pluripotent stem cells in humans over the past decade. [HL2489]

The development of techniques in both human and animal stem-cell research, including nuclear transfer and the generation on induced pluripotent stem cells, have not occurred in isolation from one another. It is therefore impossible to say to what extent any one aspect of this research has contributed to overall developments in the field. That is why Parliament has voted in favour of pursuing all avenues of stem-cell research in the United Kingdom.

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To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 23 March (WA 92), whether advances in embryonic stem cell research over the past decade have contributed towards nuclear transfer technology; and, if not, why it was cited in the previous Answer regarding non-reproductive applications of nuclear transfer. [HL2491]

Advances in animal embryonic stem cell research over the past decade have contributed towards the development of nuclear transfer technology in a variety of species.

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To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 23 March (WA 92), whether advances in nuclear transfer technology over the past decade have been essential to embryonic stem cell research; and, if not, which non-reproductive applications would benefit from nuclear transfer that have not been superseded by the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. [HL2516]

The Government have no view as to whether advances in nuclear transfer technology over the past decade have, or have not, been essential to embryonic stem-cell research. Parliament has voted in favour of pursuing all avenues of stem cell research in the United Kingdom.