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Immigration

Volume 712: debated on Wednesday 1 July 2009

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people have been (a) arrested, and (b) convicted, in each of the past three years for holding forged immigration documents. [HL4328]

The UK Border Agency statistics on arrests do not specifically record data relating to arrests for “holding forged immigration documents” as there are a number of offences both under immigration law and other legislation that this type of criminality relates to.

The Home Office publishes statistics on the number of persons removed and departed voluntarily from the UK on a quarterly and annual basis, as well as statistics on persons proceeded against for offences under immigration Acts in England and Wales annually. National statistics on immigration and asylum are placed in the Library of the House and are available from the Home Office’s research, development and statistics website at: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been (a) arrested, and (b) convicted, in each of the past three years for entering the United Kingdom without a passport. [HL4383]

On 22 September 2004, Section 2 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Act came into force. This legislation makes it an offence for persons seeking entry to the UK, to fail to produce an immigration document, which satisfactorily establishes their nationality or identity.

The Home Office publishes statistics on the number of persons proceeded against for offences under Immigration Acts 1971 to 2006 in England and Wales. The latest published annual information for 2003 to 2007 can be found in Table 6.7 of the Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom 2007 bulletin. National statistics on immigration and asylum are placed in the Library of the House and are available from the Home Office’s research, development and statistics website at: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs08/hosbl008.pdf.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many illegal immigrants were removed in each of the past five years. [HL4421]

Published statistics on immigration and asylum are available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office research, development and statistics directorate website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the number of illegal immigrants in the United Kingdom. [HL4460]

Since the phasing out of embarkation controls in 1994 no Government have been able to produce an accurate figure for the number of people who are in the country illegally. By its very nature it is impossible to quantify accurately and that remains the case.

However, the Government have reintroduced border controls through the e-borders system which will, in future, allow an estimate to be made.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty’s Government following the amendment to the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 and further to the Written Answer by Lord West of Spithead on 1 June 2009 (WA 42), how many individuals were banned from the United Kingdom from 1 June to 15 June 2009. [HL4462]

Between 1 and 15 June 2009 no individuals have been excluded from the United Kingdom under the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord West of Spithead on 1 June (WA 41), how many people have been excluded from the United Kingdom by the Home Secretary in accordance with paragraph 320(6) of the Immigration Rules. [HL4480]

Under paragraph 320(6) of the Immigration Rules, a person may be refused entry to the UK, where the Secretary of State has exercised their personal power to direct that a person be excluded.

Information on the number of passengers refused specifically in accordance with paragraph 320(6) of the Immigration Rules, could only be obtained by the detailed examination of individual case records at disproportionate cost.