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Written Answers

Volume 716: debated on Tuesday 19 January 2010

Written Answers

Tuesday 19 January 2010

Afghanistan

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what items of equipment issued to soldiers in Afghanistan have upgraded versions which are not part of the standard issue; what deficiencies there are in the equipment issued compared to the upgraded versions; what costs soldiers have to cover as a result; and when upgraded versions of the equipment will be issued as standard.[HL1052]

The Government take all measures possible to ensure that the clothing and personal equipment issued to our Armed Forces is both right for the job and right for them. The personal equipment, including protective clothing, which is issued to our troops when they deploy is fully fit for purpose, and there is no need for them to buy their own, although soldiers do sometimes seek to personalise equipment which is issued as standard.

Once an item of equipment is upgraded, the upgraded version will normally become standard issue for those who need it.

Air Rescue Service

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to carry out a formal consultation over their intention to establish a joint private finance initiative search and rescue helicopter service with the Maritime and Coastguard Agency; if so, whom they intend to consult; and over what timescale. [HL976]

The Search And Rescue Helicopter (SAR-H) private finance initiative (PFI) competition strategy was announced by MoD and Department of Transport Ministers on 9 May 2006 (Official Report, col. 12WS).

The competition to bring together the search and rescue capability currently provided by the Ministry of Defence and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency into one harmonised service continues, with two industrial consortia (AirKnight and Soteria) actively engaged. The result of the competition will be announced when an appropriately mature solution has been established.

We have regularly briefed interested parliamentarians and appropriate third parties through the UK SAR Strategic Committee throughout the competition.

Alcohol: Pricing

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the feasibility of introducing a policy of minimum pricing for alcoholic drinks, what measures they are considering in that regard; and what impact such measures might have on (a) reducing public disorder, and (b) limiting damage to health caused by over-consumption of alcohol. [HL1226]

In December 2008, the department published an independent review of the effects of alcohol pricing and promotion from the School of Health and Related Research at the University of Sheffield. The review estimated the effects on crime and health of a range of options including the impact of different levels of minimum unit price.

A copy of the publication, Independent Review of the Effects of Alcohol Pricing and Promotion from the School of Health and Related Research at the University of Sheffield, has already been placed in the Library.

We continue to look at how we can tackle the problems caused by cheap alcohol, while respecting the rights of responsible consumers. The Government have said they will commission further research in this area.

Armed Forces: A400M

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Airbus has discussed with them the circumstances that would induce it to decline to proceed with the production of the A400M. [HL1099]

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many months behind schedule the A400M aircraft was on 31 December 2009. [HL1103]

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much further delay in the production of the A400M aircraft they will accept before cancelling their order. [HL1104]

To ask Her Majesty's Government what was their share on 31 December 2009 in the cost overruns on the A400M aircraft; and by how much that figure is increasing each month. [HL1105]

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the maximum cost overrun they will accept before cancelling their order for the A400M aircraft. [HL1106]

The first flight of the A400M prototype which took place in December 2009 was 23 months late. Airbus Military has previously announced that customer deliveries would commence approximately three years after the achievement of first flight, meaning that the first delivery of a UK aircraft would occur approximately four years after first flight. Once full aircraft production activities have commenced, this amount of delay is expected to apply to the remainder of customer deliveries.

The matter of cost overrun is subject to ongoing negotiation between Partner Nations and Airbus Military, and is commercially sensitive.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many countries, other than those engaged in its production, have placed orders for or asked for options on the A400M. [HL1100]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many tonnes overweight they anticipate that the A400M will be. [HL1101]

To ask Her Majesty's Government what will be the effect on the originally planned air lift capability of the A400M aircraft of the increase in the weight of the plane. [HL1102]

The empty weight of the delivered aircraft remains to be determined and is not a contractual requirement.

The important figure is that the A400M aircraft has been specified to carry a payload of 32 tonnes, and it is currently forecast to meet this requirement.

British Citizenship

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what differences would exist between the British citizenship which would be acquired by a solely British National (Overseas) who, immediately prior to 1 July 1997, was a British Dependent Territories citizen by virtue of birth in Hong Kong, and who is registered as a British citizen (a) using Form EM under section 1(1) of the Hong Kong (British Nationality) Act 1997, or (b) using Form B(OS) under section 4B of the British Nationality Act 1981; and what are the reasons for the differences. [HL1234]

A BN(O) born in Hong Kong before 1 July 1997 and registered as a British citizen under Section 1(1) of the British Nationality Act 1981 will become a British citizen “otherwise than by descent”. A BN(O) born in Hong Kong before 1 July 1997 but registered as a British citizen under Section 4B of the British Nationality Act 1981 will become a British citizen “by descent”.

Section 2(1) of the 1997 Act provides that a beneficiary of that section would become a British citizen otherwise than by descent if, before 1 July 1997, he was a British dependent territories citizen otherwise than by descent. This was proposed by Lord Willoughby de Broke in his Private Bill, which was then taken forward by the Government into the British Nationality (Hong Kong) Bill in 1997.

Registration under Section 4B of the British Nationality Act 1981 gives British citizenship by descent. That section was originally inserted by Section 12 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002, and conferred an entitlement to registration as a British citizen on British Overseas citizens, British subjects and British protected persons who have no other nationality and have not previously given up any other nationality. That section provided for those registered as British citizens under Section 4B to become British citizens “by descent”. As such, they would be unable to transmit their citizenship to a further generation born outside the United Kingdom. This would be consistent with their previous position, whereby British Overseas citizenship and the statuses of British subject and British protected person are usually non-transmissible.

Provision was made for British Nationals (Overseas) to be registered under Section 4B in the Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009. No change was made to the provision that citizenship is acquired by descent.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government why Home Office Form B(OS) asks British Nationals (Overseas) to state the certificate number, date of issue and place of issue of their registration certificate when registration certificates have not been issued to British Nationals (Overseas); and whether they will update the application form and guidance notes to reflect the information to be provided by British Nationals (Overseas). [HL1235]

Form B(OS) originally asked British Overseas citizens, British protected persons and British subjects to provide details of their certificate of registration if they had acquired that status by registration. From 13 January 2010 British Nationals (Overseas) are able to qualify under Section 4B if they meet the relevant statutory requirements.

As BN(O) status was acquired by acquisition of a passport, I accept that it may be useful for the form B(OS) to ask for the applicant's passport details.

However, I am confident that BN(O)s in Hong Kong will not miss out because of this omission, as applications are submitted via the Consulate-General who will ensure that the relevant information will be passed on to UKBA. UKBA will revise the application form in this respect.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government which application form a solely British National (Overseas) should use to apply for British citizenship if he or she wishes the application to be considered under the British Nationality (Hong Kong) Act 1997, and, should that application fail, to be automatically considered under section 4B of the British Nationality Act 1981. [HL1236]

A BN(O) who believes that he or she qualifies for registration under the British Nationality (Hong Kong) Act 1997 should make an application using form EM. If, on consideration of the application, it appears that he or she does not meet the statutory requirements for that section, UKBA would automatically consider whether there was an alternative entitlement to registration under Section 4B of the British Nationality Act 1981.

Channel Tunnel

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of the restraints on unauthorised immigration via the Channel Tunnel. [HL1194]

The juxtaposed controls, operated by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) in France and Belgium, have been extremely effective in countering illegal entry to the UK through the Channel Tunnel. Staffed on a 24/7 basis and supported by a range of measures, including the deployment of world-leading technology, enhanced intelligence and closer working between all agencies, these controls have created one of the toughest borders in the world.

The Channel Tunnel is used by services from the Eurostar ports (Brussels, Lille and Paris) and Eurotunnel at Coquelles. From 2007 to 2009, over 5,800 passengers who were inadequately documented or did not meet the UK conditions of entry, were refused entry at the Eurostar ports. During the same period, over 2,200 passengers were refused at Coquelles port.

A total of 396,000 freight vehicles travelled through the Channel Tunnel in 2009. Over the same period, working alongside the French authorities, UKBA staff searching freight vehicles prevented 2,225 individual clandestine attempts to enter the UK illegally, via the Channel Tunnel.

In addition, the number of illegal immigrants detected in Kent has been reduced by over 80 per cent since 2002.

Democratic Republic of Congo

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo about the fate of shegues, or street children, in Kinshasa; what assessment they have made of reports that shegues are being imprisoned at Angenga and Buluwo; and what assessment they have made of conditions in those prisons. [HL1150]

We were not aware of reports that shegues are being imprisoned—and have asked the UN to investigate if shegues are being imprisoned and if so, what conditions they are being held in, and will report back when we hear.

Dubai

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their advice to United Kingdom citizens on investing in Dubai. [HL1269]

UKTI provides services for British businesses to ensure that they are better equipped to succeed in international markets. However, UKTI does not recommend specific commercial investments to British businesses. Dubai still offers good opportunities for British businesses, particularly in the financial services, construction, mass transport, health, energy and education sectors.

Embryology

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Baroness Thornton on 16 December 2009 (WA 236) and 5 January (WA 23–4), why the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) chief executive stated in his letter on 9 November 2009 that at least 681 human eggs were used under research licence R0122 to investigate laser biopsied blastocysts if the HFEA does not hold any inspection reports for research licence R0122 describing polar body biopsy of eggs and if no use of eggs was recorded in the initial application for that licence and any subsequent renewal applications or in the cited progress report. [HL1209]

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Baroness Thornton on 5 January (WA 24–5), why the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) inspection report for licence R0152 that quoted “a lack of suitable oocytes for use in the study” is not included amongst those available on the authority's website; and why the HFEA has not placed a full copy of the report in the Library of the House. [HL1210]

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Baroness Thornton on 9 November 2009 (WA 111) and 5 January (WA 24–5), how the proposed use of eggs fulfils the criteria of the research licence if a researcher repeatedly requests the use of numbers of eggs that are more than they claim to have used each successive year, with particular reference to information cited in the 2005 inspection report and licence renewal. [HL1211]

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Baroness Thornton on 5 January (WA 24–5), when the Newcastle Fertility Centre began providing information on the number of failed-to-fertilise eggs donated for use under licence R0152 and the number actually used in the project; whether the estimated number of failed-to-fertilise eggs takes account of 10 failed-to-fertilise eggs reportedly having been used between August 2004 and July 2005 if the research team initially relied chiefly on such eggs, as reported in the Times on 31 May 2005 and in the Obstetrician & Gynaecologist (2007) Volume 9, Issue 3, p. 177–80; and whether oocytes that a researcher might subsequently deem to be unsuitable would be erased from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's records of total oocyte usage. [HL1212]

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Baroness Thornton on 5 January (WA 24–5), what was the mean number of eggs collected per cycle at the Newcastle Fertility Centre in each year since 2004; whether the estimate of 900 failed-to-fertilise eggs potentially available for research takes account of those figures combined with the number of treatment cycles performed annually at the Newcastle Fertility Centre and the percentage of all eggs that failed-to-fertilise according to the initial application for licence R0152; and whether estimated numbers of failed-to-fertilise eggs based on these figures takes account of a total of 1224 failed-to-fertilise eggs obtained between 2 June 2005 and 11 May 2006 or a total of 1,170 failed-to-fertilise eggs obtained in 2007 according to Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority research licence inspection reports. [HL1213]

A research licence under paragraph 3(1) of Schedule 2 of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (as amended) authorises the creation of embryos in vitro and keeping or using embryos for the purposes of a project of research, whose purpose must be consistent with paragraph 3A of that schedule. Parliament has decided in view of the special importance attached to embryos that no research may be conducted on them without a licence, but that is not the case for research involving only eggs or sperm.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised that it receives information about the use of eggs incidentally to the research licensing process, but the information it holds on the use of eggs is necessarily limited, compared to the information it holds on the use of embryos. Directions 0002 issued by the HFEA (dated 1 July 2009) require licence holders to maintain records on total numbers of embryos created, used or disposed of in undertaking the licensed research. Such data held by the HFEA are made available in inspection reports and research licence committee minutes published on the HFEA website. Where inspection reports and research licence committee minutes are not available on the HFEA website these can be requested from the HFEA.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government with regard to a letter from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's legal adviser on 7 December 2009 describing the volume of correspondence about the use of eggs under research licence R0152, how many academics, clinicians or interested members of the general public requested such information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000; what indication such applicants provided regarding their interest in the relevant data; what response was provided to each of those applicants; and what proportion of the HFEA's time was spent dealing with those requests. [HL1214]

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised that a high-level keyword database search of over 400 freedom of information requests made between 18 September 2006 and 13 January 2010 identified eight relevant requests, excluding requests from the noble Lord. The HFEA also advises that it is not possible to quantify what proportion of its time was spent dealing with these requests, and responses to requests made under the Freedom of Information Act are undertaken without consideration of the applicant or their purpose in making the request. The HFEA's responses to these requests concerned the regulatory oversight of the research licence.

Flooding

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what payments they have made to (a) local authorities, and (b) other bodies, in connection with the flooding in 2007. [HL960]

In the wake of the summer floods of 2007, the Government committed to the effective management of flood and coastal erosion risk. Spending across central and local government has increased from £307 million in 1996-97 to £660 million in 2008-09, £715 million in 2009-10 and is set to reach £780 million in 2010-11.

The Government made available a comprehensive package of over £136 million to assist those affected by the 2007 floods. Funding given to local authorities included:

£18.8 million funding through the Bellwin scheme which provides financial assistance to local authorities dealing with emergencies;

£18.4 million from the Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) for flood recovery grants to support the recovery work of local authorities, and particularly their work with those in greatest and most immediate need;

around £41 million from the Department for Transport for repairs to local highways;

£13.5 million from the Department for Children, Schools and Families for schools and children's services affected by the floods;

over £1.2 million from CLG for local authorities giving council tax discounts, so families do not face council tax bills for homes they could not live in; and

local authorities received £30.6 million from CLG's Restoration Fund, and were free to spend it according to local priorities.

Other main recipients of the £136 million support package included:

regional development agencies provided £10 million in support of business and economic recovery in the affected areas;

the Department for Work and Pensions paid Community Care Grants and Crisis Loans totalling £810,891 to people on qualifying benefits to meet the cost of replacing essential household items; and

VisitBritain received £1 million from the Department for Culture Media and Sport to support rural tourism in England through promoting rural destinations and visitor attractions.

Following the 2007 floods, Sir Michael Pitt carried out a review of the event. The Government set aside £34.5 million to implement Sir Michael's review.

The table below provides details of how much has been allocated to date. It shows that a total of £20.2 million has been allocated to individual agencies and bodies by Defra.

Allocation to:

Allocation (£m)

Allocated by Dec 2009

To deliver:

Local Authorities

£15 million

£10 million between 80 local authorities

Local authority leadership on flood risk management in the highest priority areas, including surface water management plans, tackling surface water problems, mapping of drainage assets, and oversight and maintenance of sustainable drainage systems for new housing, etc.

Environment Agency and Met Office

£5.0 million

£3.76 million

A new joint forecasting and warning centre, including the extreme rainfall alert.

Environment Agency

£8.5 million

£5 million

All other recommendations where the Environment Agency leads, including its new strategic overview of all types of flood risk in England, better modelling, forecasting and mapping for flooding, particularly surface water, roll-out of ex-directory flood warnings, reservoir inundation maps, and a national flooding exercise to test the new response arrangements.

Met Office

£0.5 million

£230,000

Research to make use of new detailed forecasting models for flooding.

Cabinet Office

£0.4 million

£0.2 million

New team within the Civil Contingencies Secretariat to run a national campaign to improve the resilience of critical national infrastructure.

Others

£10,000

£10,000

To fund the Risk and Regulatory Advisory Council to consider the communication of flood risk to the public.

Contingency

£5.1 million

£1.0 million

To provide a contingency fund in case allocations need to be increased in some areas, and to include: up to £2 million for an improved flood rescue capability; up to £1.25 million to support the production of reservoir emergency plans by local resilience forums. Funds have also been provided to the following additional activities announced since the Government's response.

£750,000 to support local authority flood risk management apprenticeships this year and next. A further £250,000 is being funded from other budgets.

£140,000 to fund a reservoir inundation mapping tool.

Total

£34.5 million

£20.2 million

From: Annex A of the Progress Report on the Government's Response to Sir Michael Pitt's Review (published 15 December 2009).

Government Departments: Bonuses

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government for each of the last three years for which figures are available, how many people were eligible for performance bonuses and special bonuses in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and its agencies, by civil service band; how many people received each type of bonus, by civil service band; what the average payment was for each type of bonus, by civil service band; and what the maximum payment was for each type of bonus, by civil service band.[HL36]

An element of Defra’s overall pay award is allocated to non-consolidated variable pay related to performance. These payments are used to drive high performance and form part of the pay award for members of staff who demonstrate exceptional performance—for example, by exceeding targets set or meeting challenging objectives.

Non-consolidated variable pay awards are funded from within existing pay bill controls, and have to be re-earned each year against predetermined targets and, as such, do not add to future pay bill costs. The percentage of the pay bill set aside for performance-related awards for the SCS is based on recommendations from the independent Senior Salaries Review Body.

The table below details how many people were eligible for and received a non-consolidated variable pay awards and the average and the maximum payment for a non-consolidated variable pay award, by civil service band, awarded under the Defra standard pay and performance management process for the three most recent performance years for which the relevant payments have been published in the department's accounts.

Table 1 covers staff at grade 6 and below or equivalent in core Defra (including staff who transferred to DECC on 3 October 2008) and those executive agencies (Animal Health, Veterinary Medicines Directorate and Marine and Fisheries Agency) that are covered by the core department's remuneration arrangements. It covers senior civil servants in core Defra and its executive agencies (Animal Health, Veterinary Medicines Directorate, Marine and Fisheries Agency, Rural Payments Agency, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science and the Central Science Laboratory—which is now part of the Food and Environment Research Agency, which was created on 1 April 2009).

The remaining tables cover staff at grade 6 and below or equivalent, employed in those executive agencies that operate delegated pay arrangements (Rural Payments Agency, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science and the Central Science Laboratory, which is now part of the Food and Environment Research Agency, which was created 10 April 2009).

Core Defra—(including staff in Animal Health, Veterinary Medicines Directorate and the Marine and Fisheries Agency)

Table 1

Performance Year 2005-06

Performance Year 2006-07

Performance Year 2007-08

SCS

Non- SCS

SCS

Non- SCS

SCS

Non- SCS

Number of staff eligible for non-consolidated performance payment

189

5805

186

4980

171

4565

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

153

2242

152

1807

150

1764

Average value of non-consolidated performance payment

£6,000

£400

£8,000

£400

£8,500

£400

The value of maximum non-consolidated payment

£15,147

£4,506

£15,640

£4,577

£17,250

£3,966

Percentage of SCS paybill set aside for non-consolidated performance payments

6.5%

N/A

7.6%

N/A

8.6%

N/A

Veterinary Laboratories Agency

Performance Year 2005-06

Performance Year 2006-07

Performance Year2007-08

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for non consolidated performance payment

1313

1360

1290

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

251

212

226

Average value of non-consolidated performance payment

£228

£253

£274

The value of maximum non- consolidated payment

£684

£627

£605

Central Science Laboratory—which is now part of the Food and Environment Research Agency, which was created on 1 April 2009

Performance Year 2005-06

Performance Year 2006-07

Performance Year 2007-08

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for non- consolidated performance payment

681

680

670

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

260

328

332

Average value of non-consolidated performance payment

£657

£799

£554

The value of maximum non-consolidated payment

£2,943

£3,063

£3,807

Rural Payments Agency

Performance Year 2005-06

Performance Year 2006-07

Performance Year 2007-08

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for non- consolidated performance payment

3078

3529

3330

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

505

813

1126

Average value of non-consolidated performance payment

£500

£700

£200

The value of maximum non- consolidated payment

£500

£700

£800

Centre for the Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science

Performance Year 2005-06

Performance Year 2006-07

Performance Year 2007-08

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for non-consolidated performance payment

554

562

541

Number of staff who received a non-consolidated performance payment

511

506

496

Average value of non-consolidated performance payment

£745

£975

£1,267

The value of maximum non- consolidated payment

£5,147

£5,902

£5,405

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government for each of the past three years for which figures are available, how many people were eligible for performance bonuses and special bonuses in the Department of Health and its agencies, by civil service band; how many people received each type of bonus, by civil service band; what the average payment was for each type of bonus, by civil service band; and what the maximum payment was for each type of bonus, by civil service band[HL37]

An increasing element of the pay awards for the department and its agencies over the past three years has been allocated to non-consolidated performance pay. These payments are used to recognise excellent performance and exemplary behaviours in contributing to the department's objectives.

Non-consolidated variable pay awards are funded from within existing pay bill controls and have to be re-earned each year. They do not add to future pay bill costs. In the case of the senior Civil Service, the percentage of paybill set aside for performance-related awards is based on recommendations from the independent Senior Salaries Review Body. For staff at AO to grade 6, the percentage of paybill set aside was determined by a three-year pay settlement introduced in 2008-09.

The following tables show, for the department and its agencies, how many people were eligible for (estimated at year end) and received a non-consolidated variable pay award and the average and maximum payment for the award, by civil service band, awarded under the department's standard pay and performance management processes for the past three years of published accounts. The tables include in-year and end-year performance payments but not non-consolidated payments made as part of a pay award to those at or near the maxima of their pay scales.

Core Department of Health

2006-071

2007-081

2008-09

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for performance-pay award

261

2,069

247

1,987

260

1,985

Number of staff who received a performance-pay award2

175

241

176

433

214

924

Median value of a performance-pay award

5,662

700

8,927

661

7,927

500

The maximum payment for a performance pay award1

30,699

9,000

322,750

9,000

326,775

12,000

Percentage of SCS paybill set aside for performance pay

6.5%

N/A

7.6%

N/A

8.6%

N/A

Notes:

1. The table includes both in-year and end-year non-consolidated performance payments. End-year payments are in respect of performance in the previous year; that is, end-year payments made in 2008-09 relate to performance year 2007-08 etc.

2. The number of eligible staff will be slightly underestimated as there are a number of staff with “unknown” grades on the department's HR information system.

3. In addition, an individual employed on a SCS non-standard form of contract, which links a higher than normal percentage of their pay to performance, received total non-consolidated payments of £27,500 in 2007-08 and £49,004 in 2008-09.

Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency

2006-071

2007-081

2008-091

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for performance-pay award

109

818

112

867

120

812

Number of staff who received a performance-pay award

72

191

75

168

98

310

Median value of a performance-pay award

4,584

400

9,289

500

9,301

500

The maximum payment for a performance pay award

12,480

15,809

19,776

12,573

26,085

17,500

Percentage of SCS paybill set aside for performance pay

6.5%

N/A

7.6%

N/A

8.6%

N/A

Notes:

1. The table includes both in-year and end-year non-consolidated performance payments. End-year payments are in respect of performance in the previous year; that is, end-year payments made in 2008-09 relate to performance year 2007-08 etc.

NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency

2006-071

2007-081

2008-091

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

SCS

Non-SCS

Number of staff eligible for performance-pay award

9

259

8

260

6

248

Number of staff who received a performance-pay award

7

71

*2

13

6

58

Median value of a performance-pay award

4,800

1,000

*

1,000

8,530

538

The maximum payment for a performance pay award

5,420

3,500

*

2,500

11,432

3,500

Percentage of SCS paybill set aside for performance pay

6.5%

N/A

7.6%

N/A

8.6%

N/A

Notes:

1. The table includes both in-year and end-year non-consolidated performance payments. End-year payments are in respect of performance in the previous year; that is, end-year payments made in 2008-09 relate to performance year 2007-08 etc.

2. Where there are less than five employees in a grade, data are omitted on grounds of confidentiality.

Government: Office Equipment

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Barbara Follett, on 9 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 390W), what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by (a) the Central Office of Information, (b) the Charity Commission, (c) the UK Statistics Authority, (d) the National School of Government, (e) the Audit Commission, and (f) the Cabinet Office in the latest period for which figures are available. [HL991]

As part of its commitment to the Government's sustainable procurement agenda the Cabinet Office uses Evolve (100 per cent recycled) 80 gsm copier paper at an average cost of £1.77 for a 500 sheet ream. The average costs to the Central Office of Information and the National School of Government, for a 500 sheet ream, were £1.96 and £1.66 respectively. The Charity Commission uses a combination of Evolve (100 per cent recycled) 80 gsm copier paper at its London and Newport offices and EP4 (75 per cent recycled) 80 gsm copier paper in its Liverpool and Taunton offices. The average cost per 500 sheet ream is £1.96 excluding value added tax. The Charity Commission will be using Evolve in all its offices by the end of the year. The average price paid by UK Statistics Authority, including ONS, is £2.43 per 500 sheet ream.

The Cabinet Office is not responsible for the Audit Commission.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Barbara Follett, on 9 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 390W), what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by (a) HM Courts Service, and (b) the Ministry of Justice in the latest period for which figures are available. [HL995]

The purchase of stationery items has being consolidated. The Ministry of Justice, which includes HM Courts Service, therefore uses only two white A4 80gsm photocopier papers. Reducing the varying number of photocopier papers has enabled the ministry to negotiate competitive pricing, giving the tax payer value for money. If the average price of these products were disclosed it would breach the commercial confidentially provisions in the contract and would give an unfair advantage to other suppliers.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Barbara Follett, on 9 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 390W), what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by the Home Office and each of its agencies in the latest period for which figures are available. [HL1030]

As part of its commitment to the Government's sustainable procurement agenda, the department uses recycled photocopier paper. The average purchasing costs, excluding value added tax, of a 500-sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm recycled paper paid for by the Home Office and each of its agencies, in the latest period for which figures are available, are in the attached table:

Recycled photocopier paper

Home Office and UKBA

CRB

IPS

Average cost per ream

£1.79

1.62

£2.14

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Barbara Follett, on 9 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 390W), what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by (a) the NHS Purchasing Supply Agency, and (b) the Department of Health, in the latest period for which figures are available. [HL1034]

The department is committed to the Government's sustainable procurement agenda and uses 100 per cent recycled A4 80 gsm photocopier paper at a current average price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream in 2009 of:

NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency

£2.40

Department of Health

£2.30

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Barbara Follett, on 9 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 390W), what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500 sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by the Scotland Office in the latest period for which figures are available. [HL1173]

During financial year 2008-09, the photocopier paper purchased by the Scotland Office was purchased at an average cost of £1.84 per ream of 500 sheets, excluding value added tax.

Gross Domestic Product

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of United Kingdom gross domestic product was represented by manufacturing in 1990 and in 2009. [HL1071]

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, Director-General for Office for National Statistics, to Lord Jones, dated January 2010.

As Director-General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what proportion of United Kingdom Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was represented by manufacturing in 1990 and 2009. (HL1071)

When assessing industry percentages to total production it is more appropriate to assess against total gross value added (GVA) as opposed to GDP. This is because GDP equals GVA plus unallocated taxes and subsidies such as VAT which are not able to be allocated to industry production.

In current (nominal) price terms for the calendar year 1990 total manufacturing is estimated to have made up 22.5 per cent of total GVA. For 2008 (the latest complete year currently published), total manufacturing is estimated to have made up 12.3 per cent of total GVA.

Health: Contaminated Blood Products

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Thornton on 5 January (WA 41–2), between which officials in the Republic of Ireland's Department of Health and Children and the Department of Health in Her Majesty's Government the information in the answer was agreed; whether at any stage any minister in Her Majesty's Government or of the government of the Republic of Ireland was involved in the matter; and what attention was given to the status of the expert group, which was not a tribunal, and its remit, limited to hepatitis C infection caused by anti D. [HL1133]

No Ministers in either Her Majesty's Government or in Ireland were involved in the exchange of information between officials as these related to factual matters. In this instance, the correspondence was between the blood policy team in the Department of Health and the Blood and Tissue Policy Unit in the Irish Department of Health and Children.

The expert group in Ireland was established by the Minister for Health in 1994. Its terms of reference were:

“To examine and report to the Minister for Health on the following matters:

all the circumstances surrounding the infection of the anti-D immunoglobulin product manufactured by the Blood Transfusion Board; and

the systems and standards in place for donor selection, the manufacturing process and use of the anti-D immunoglobulin produced by the Blood Transfusion Board.

To make recommendations to the Minister for Health on the above matters and on any other matters relating to the Blood Transfusion Board which the Group consider necessary”.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what part Crown Immunity played in protecting the Blood Products Laboratory from legal proceedings for failing to comply with the Medicines Act 1968 to the hurt of haemophilia patients treated with contaminated NHS blood and blood products. [HL1134]

Crown immunity gave no protection from civil legal proceedings. Some affected individuals who had acquired HIV infection through their treatment with blood products did bring a civil action in 1990, which was settled out of court.

Immigration: Yarl's Wood

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government on what basis parliamentarians may be refused entry to Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre. [HL1023]

The Detention Centre Rules 2001 allow the Secretary of State to manage visits to immigration removal centres. Requests from parliamentarians to visit any centre are therefore directed for consideration to the Home Secretary and to the Minister of State for Borders and Immigration. We receive many such requests and are normally able to comply.

Kazakhstan

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will support the holding of a summit rather than a ministerial meeting at the end of the 2010 Kazakhstan chairmanship of the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe; or by when they will make that decision. [HL990]

At the 2009 Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Ministerial Council in Athens, member states noted Kazakhstan’s proposal for an OSCE summit in 2010. Ministers pointed out that such a high-level meeting would require adequate preparation in terms of substance and modalities.

The OSCE will decide to hold a summit when there is a consensus on what the substance would be. Progress in the OSCE’s discussions on the future of European security, otherwise known as the “Corfu process”, will be an important consideration.

Legislation

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government which Acts of Parliament have been subject to post-legislative review in pursuance of the policy to review Acts three to five years after enactment.[HL1176]

The first post-legislative review Command Paper was published in December 2008 on the Electoral Registration (Northern Ireland) Act 2005 (Cm 7504) and the second in June 2009 on the Railways Act 2005 (Cm 7660). Three further papers are due to be published by the end of February 2010.

Command Papers on other Acts passed in 2005 are being developed and will be published by the Summer Recess in 2010, unless the department has negotiated an extension with the relevant departmental select committee of the House of Commons. Subsequent Acts will publish reviews within three to five years of Royal Assent.

In March 2008, the Cabinet Office produced detailed guidance for departments on post-legislative scrutiny (available on the Cabinet Office website). A system has also been put in place to ensure that all departments are working on producing Command Papers for Select Committees on the implementation of each Act.

Life Expectancy

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average life expectancy in England for (a) men, and (b) women in each year from 1979 to 2009; and whether they have access to comparable figures for (1) Northern Ireland, (2) Scotland, and (3) Wales. [HL1310]

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Dennis Roberts, Director, Surveys and Administrative Sources, Office for National Statistics, to Lord Selkirk, dated January 2010.

The director for the Office for National Statistics has been asked to reply to your recent parliamentary Question concerning the average life expectancy in the UK constituent countries since 1979. 1 am replying in his absence. (HL1310)

The attached table provides the period expectation of life at birth for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland for each year (where available) from 1979 to 2009 for males and females. The period expectation of life at birth is the average number of years a person would live, if he or she experienced the particular country's age-specific mortality rates for that time period throughout his or her life.

Period Expectation of Life at birth, UK constituent countries, 1979-2009

Year

Males

Females

England

Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

England

Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

1979*

70.4

69.7

..

..

76.4

75.9

..

..

1980*

70.8

70.3

69.0

69.3

76.8

76.3

75.2

75.0

1981

71.1

70.4

69.1

69.2

77.0

76.4

75.3

75.5

1982

71.3

70.7

69.3

69.8

77.3

76.6

75.5

76.0

1983

71.6

71.1

69.6

70.1

77.5

77.0

75.6

76.3

1984

71.8

71.2

69.9

70.3

77.6

77.1

75.8

76.7

1985

72.0

71.4

70.0

70.6

77.8

77.4

76.0

76.9

1986

72.2

71.6

70.2

70.9

77.9

77.5

76.2

77.1

1987

72.4

72.0

70.4

71.1

78.1

77.9

76.5

77.3

1988

72.7

72.3

70.6

71.5

78.3

78.0

76.5

77.5

1989

72.9

72.6

70.8

71.7

78.4

78.3

76.6

77.6

1990

73.1

72.8

71.1

72.1

78.6

78.5

76.7

78.0

1991

73.4

73.1

71.4

72.6

78.9

78.8

77.1

78.4

1992

73.6

73.2

71.5

72.7

79.0

78.8

77.1

78.6

1993

73.9

73.4

71.7

73.0

79.2

78.9

77.3

78.7

1994

74.1

73.4

71.9

73.1

79.3

78.9

77.4

78.7

1995

74.4

73.7

72.1

73.5

79.5

79.1

77.7

78.9

1996

74.5

73.8

72.2

73.8

79.6

79.1

77.9

79.2

1997

74.8

74.2

72.4

74.2

79.7

79.3

78.0

79.5

1998

75.0

74.3

72.6

74.3

79.9

79.3

78.2

79.5

1999

75.3

74.6

72.8

74.5

80.1

79.6

78.4

79.6

2000

75.6

74.8

73.1

74.8

80.3

79.7

78.6

79.8

2001

75.9

75.3

73.3

75.2

80.6

80.0

78.8

80.1

2002

76.1

75.5

73.5

75.6

80.7

80.1

78.9

80.4

2003

76.5

75.8

73.8

75.8

80.9

80.3

79.1

80.6

2004

76.8

76.1

74.2

76.0

81.1

80.6

79.3

80.8

2005

77.2

76.6

74.6

76.1

81.5

80.9

79.6

81.0

2006

77.5

76.7

74.8

76.2

81.7

81.1

79.7

81.2

2007

77.7

76.9

75.0

76.3

81.9

81.2

79.9

81.2

2008*

77.9

77.1

75.2

76.6

82.0

81.3

80.0

81.2

2009*

78.4

77.5

75.8

77.0

82.4

81.7

80.4

81.7

* These life expectancy figures are based on the national interim life tables (NILT) for all years apart from those marked with one asterisk. As figures are not available from the NILTs for these years the life expectancy estimates are based on a single year’s data rather than three years.

** National interim life tables are not available and so life expectancy figures based on assumed rates of mortality from the 2008-based National Population Projections have been used.

.. Data not available

Northern Ireland Office: Bonuses

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage increase in salaries and bonuses the staff in the Northern Ireland Office received in each year since 2000. [HL615]

All staff in the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) are paid in accordance with guidance issued by Cabinet Office/HM Treasury.

The following table sets out the salary and non-consolidated performance pay increases since 2000. It should be noted that the percentage figures listed in the table relate to the average increase in pay or non-consolidated performance payments across the NIO (rather than the increase awarded to each individual) in accordance with the terms of each year’s pay award.

Year

Grades A to D2 Pay

In Year Performance Payments

End of Year Performance Payments

Senior Civil Service Pay

Senior Civil Service Performance Payments

2000

4.5%

0.4%

n/a

4.8%

***

2001

4.8%

0.4%

n/a

4.7%

***

2002

5.5%

0.4%

n/a

6.0%

2.3%

2003

3.0%

0.4%

n/a

5.1%

3.8%

2004

*2.95%

0.4%

0.54%

3.5%

4.0%

2005

**4.65%

0.4%

0.54%

4.2%

5.0%

2006

3.6%

0.4%

0.54%

3.25%

6.5%

2007

3.6%

0.4%

0.54%

2.6%

7.6%

2008

3.54%

0.4%

0.54%

2.5%

8.6%

* In 2004, the pay award equated to 3.49%. However, 0.54% was used to fund the introduction of the end of year non-consolidated performance payment scheme.

** In 2005, the pay award equated to 4.65% over a 16 month period. This equated to 3.49% over 12 months.

*** Records indicate that SCS non-consolidated performance payments were introduced in 2001, effective from April 2002.

Northern Ireland Office: Taxis

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much officials of the Northern Ireland Office claimed on expenses for the use of taxis in December of each of the last five years. [HL948]

Staff may claim taxi expenses for non-pre-booked journeys which are approved by line managers in accordance with the departmental travel policy. These are reimbursed through staff expenses claims and are recorded as incidental expenditure on the departmental finance system.

Extracting the information requested would require a manual investigation of all the claims for this period. These costs cannot be provided except at disproportionate cost.

Passports

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications were dealt with by the Personal Passport Interview procedure in 2009. [HL1222]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Personal Passport Interview applications were rejected in 2009. [HL1223]

There were two passport applications refused in 2009 as a direct result of confirmation of identity interviews. As the main function of the interview is to act as a deterrent to those attempting to assume another identity, we expect the number to remain low.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Personal Passport Interview applications were made at each of the offices and at each remote venue in 2009. [HL1224]

Attached is the breakdown of how many confirmation of identity interviews were conducted at each of the Identity and Passport Service's interview offices in 2009. A total of 2,244 interviews were conducted in 2009 using the Video Interview Service and these are included in the host offices' totals. However, a breakdown of how many were undertaken at each remote location is also attached. (Host Offices denoted by**)

Jan 09—Dec 09 Interview Office

Interviews Conducted

Aberdeen

2035

Aberystwyth

640

Andover

1601

Armagh

744

Belfast**

3191

Berwick on Tweed

217

Birmingham

17830

Blackburn

5624

Bournemouth

2291

Brighton

3848

Bristol

5019

Bury St Edmunds

1763

Carlisle

1197

Chelmsford

7353

Cheltenham

2607

Coleraine

1019

Crawley

4358

Derby

6787

Dover

1634

Dumfries

461

Dundee**

2350

Edinburgh

3710

Exeter

2240

Glasgow**

8427

Inverness**

1139

Ipswich

2293

Kendal

1204

Kings Lynn

920

Kingston upon Hull

2879

Leeds

10146

Leicester

5709

Lincoln

2684

Liverpool**

9382

London

59317

Luton

9656

Maidstone

4928

Manchester

14346

Middlesbrough

3611

Newcastle

6849

Newport

5535

Newport IOW

581

Northampton

4249

Norwich

2796

Oban

86

Omagh

391

Oxford

3175

Peterborough

3409

Plymouth

1972

Portsmouth

4419

Reading

8917

Redruth

515

Ripon

700

Scarborough

603

Selkirk

275

Sheffield

7380

Shrewsbury

2036

Sleaford

667

South Molton

662

St Austell

1149

Stirling

1149

Stoke on Trent

3641

Swansea**

3831

Swindon

1712

Warwick

3123

Wick

176

Wrexham**

2647

Yeovil

1726

York

1659

Totals

291190

VIS Interviews completed in 2009

Location

Interviews completed from Jan to Dec 2009

Lerwick

167

Kirkwall

114

Lochinver

5

Ullapool

8

Lochcarron

10

Stornoway

76

Balivanich

33

Barra

5

Portree

38

Elgin

261

Kingussie

11

Fort William

51

Tobermory

7

Tiree

5

Lochgilphead

42

Dunoon

36

Rothesay

25

Bowmore

21

Campbeltown

40

Lamlash

10

Cumnock

67

Dalmellington

41

Girvan

25

Stranraer

121

Caernarfon

568

Newtown

8

Haverfordwest

464

St Mary’s

7

Total

2244

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total cost of the Personal Passport Interview project for (a) 2007, (b) 2008, and (c) 2009. [HL1225]

The operational costs, excluding depreciation of set-up costs, associated with running the interview office network in each of the three years are outlined in the attached table.

Year

Total Cost

2007

£12,968,533

2008

£27,174,342

2009

£27,562,223

Police: Northern Ireland

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government to what extent the Police Service of Northern Ireland is financially structured to enable effective co-operation with the Northern Ireland Office and the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety in the Republic of Ireland on Access Northern Ireland and the Safeguarding Board for Northern Ireland. [HL941]

The PSNI receives an overall budget from which it meets the overall costs of policing including any co-operation needed with other organisations. Matters on prioritisation within that budget are a matter for the chief constable.

In addition to this, a further arrangement exists between AccessNl and PSNI, for the disclosure of relevant non-conviction information. This arrangement is subject to a separate funding agreement.

Prisoners: Voting

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the European Union has the power to rule the next general election result illegal if prisoners are not allowed to vote. [HL1080]

Royal Navy: Fleet

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (a) aircraft carriers, (b) destroyers, (c) frigates, and (d) other battleships, are operational; and for which each of the 11 admirals in the Royal Navy is responsible. [HL958]

The Royal Navy currently has three aircraft carriers, six destroyers, 17 frigates and three other capital ships (HMS “Ocean”, HMS “Albion” and HMS “Bulwark”) in the operating cycle, though those undergoing maintenance or refit are held at lower readiness for operations. In a letter dated 6 March 2007 to the honourable Member for New Forest East (Mr Lewis), the readiness policy for Royal Naval ships was set out. A copy of the letter was placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Admirals in the Royal Navy are not assigned responsibility for individual vessels.

Schools: Truanting

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many school children played truant on average for one day per week during each of the years 1997–98 to 2007–08; what were the total number of days in each of those years that school children played truant; what is the number of days in the current year; and what are the implications for the educational attainment of persistent truants, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. [HL1006]

Information is collected on authorised and unauthorised absence.

Unauthorised absence is absence without leave from a teacher or other authorised representative of the school. This includes all unexplained or unjustified absences, such as lateness, holidays during term time not authorised by the school, absence where reason is not yet established, and truancy. Information collected by my department on absence is a more comprehensive measure of children's missed schooling. Our focus is on reducing all forms of absence, not just a small subset. The issue is not whether the pupil had permission to be absent; it is how much absence the pupil has. Those pupils who miss 64 sessions (typically 20 per cent of sessions) are classed as persistent absentees.

The latest available published information on absence is published as SFR 03/2009 “Pupil Absence in Schools in England, including Pupil Characteristics: 2007-08” at http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000832/index.shtml.

Table 4.1 provides the available information on persistent absence (data are not available prior to 2005-06). Table 1.1 shows the percentage of sessions missed due to authorised, unauthorised and overall absence.

The analysis below, shows that KS4 attainment for persistent absentees is lower than for other pupils. We are focusing our efforts on reducing persistent absence and the latest figures available show that the percentage of pupils who are persistent absentees reduced to 3.6 per cent in 2007-08, from 4.1 per cent in the previous year.

2007 KS4 Attainment by Persistent Absence— comparison of selected groups

The percentage of pupils in mainstream maintained schools (including CTC's and academies but excluding special schools) achieving 5+ A*-C including English and maths in 2007

Others

Pupils who were Persistently Absent in both KS years

Girls

50.4%

7.8%

Boys

40.8%

4.7%

White British

46.0%

6.5%

Minority Ethnic

44.5%

5.8%

FSM

23.3%

3.3%

SEN

11.7%

2.2%

EAL

42.4%

5.7%

All Pupils

45.7%

6.4%

The figures show that pupils who are not persistent absentees are seven times more likely to achieve 5+ A*-C including English and maths compared to persistent absentees.

Table 1.1

Primary, Secondary and Special Schools(1) (2) (3): Pupil Absence by type of School

1996-97 to 2007-08

England

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

Total

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

6,654,070

6,611,130

6,699,580

6,728,210

6,791,270

6,800,360

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

..

..

..

..

..

Percentage of half days missed due to (6)

Authorised absence

6.67

6.68

6.47

6.27

6.68

6.43

Unauthorised absence

0.73

0.78

0.77

0.74

0.76

0.75

Overall absence

7.41

7.45

7.24

7.01

7.44

7.19

Primary Schools (1)

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

3,770,800

3,730,360

3,734,770

3,719,190

3,741,370

3,704,090

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

..

..

..

..

..

Percentage of half days missed due to (6)

Authorised absence

5.58

5.71

5.39

5.19

5.59

5.40

Unauthorised absence

0.48

0.50

0.49

0.47

0.49

0.45

Overall absence

6.06

6.21

5.89

5.66

6.08

5.85

Secondary Schools (1)(2)

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

2,802,350

2,799,590

2,885,420

2,930,540

2,969,980

3,016,860

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

Percentage of half days missed due to (6):

Authorised absence

8.06

7.90

7.79

7.57

7.97

7.62

Unauthorised absence

1.01

1.09

1.07

1.04

1.06

1.09

Overall absence

9.06

9.00

8.86

8.61

9.03

8.71

Special Schools (3)

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

80,920

81,180

79,390

78,480

79,920

79,410

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

Percentage of half days missed due to (6)

Authorised absence

8.68

8.60

8.55

8.30

9.15

8.88

Unauthorised absence

2.56

2.69

2.48

2.17

2.29

2.10

Overall absence

11.24

11.29

11.02

10.48

11.44

10.98

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Total

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

6,793,940

6,768,720

6,704,920

6,568,160

6,332,070

6,244,890

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

..

..

..

6,582,430

6,478,700

Percentage of half days missed due to (6)

Authorised absence

6.25

5.96

5.77

6.05

5.49

5.28

Unauthorised absence

0.74

0.76

0.81

0.92

1.00

1.01

Overall absence

6.98

6.72

6.58

6.96

6.49

6.29

Primary Schools (1)

~

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age(4)

3,665,170

3,617,430

3,565,050

3,509,550

3,306,900

3,263,380

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

..

..

..

3,463,120

3,412,000

Percentage of half days missed due to (6)

Authorised absence

5.38

5.08

5.00

5.30

4.66

4.69

Unauthorised absence

0.43

0.41

0.43

0.45

0.52

0.57

Overall absence

5.81

5.49

5.43

5.76

5.18

5.26

Secondary Schools (1)(2)

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

3,049,580

3,072,960

3,063,120

2,983,050

2,952,350

2,910,520

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

3,056,330

3,042,077

2,989,290

Percentage of half days missed due to (6):

Authorised absence

7.20

6.92

6.57

6.82

6.36

5.87

Unauthorised absence

1.07

1.14

1.23

1.42

1.52

1.49

Overall absence

8.27

8.06

7.81

8.24

7.87

7.36

Special Schools (3)

Number of day pupils of compulsory school age (4)

79,190

78,340

76,750

75,550

72,810

70,990

Number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

..

..

..

77,230

77,400

Percentage of half days missed due to (6):

Authorised absence

8.85

8.64

8.61

8.79

8.55

8.41

Unauthorised absence

1.98

1.86

1.87

1.80

2.07

2.16

Overall absence

10.83

10.50

10.48

10.59

10.62

10.57

Source: Absence in Schools Survey and School Census (7)

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.

(2) Includes maintained secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies (including all-through academies).

(3) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools, independent special schools and independent schools approved for SEN pupils. Previously published figures for 1996-97 to 2005-06 included independent special schools and independent schools approved for SEN pupils and will therefore differ from those in Table 1.1 .

(4) Pupil numbers are as at January 2008. Includes pupils aged 5 to 15 with sole and dual (main) registration. Excludes boarders.

(5) Number of pupil enrolments in schools from start of the school year up until 23 May 2008. Includes pupils on the school roll for al least one session who are aged between 5 and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once (if they moved schools during the school year or are registered at more than one school). See Notes to Editors 11 to 13.

(6) The number of sessions missed due to authorised/unauthorised/overall absence expressed as a percentage of the total number of possible sessions.

(7) Figures in italics have been sourced from the absence in schools survey. Other figures are derived from school census returns. Totals provided for 2005-06 combine figures from both sources. See Notes to Editor 9. Dashed lines in time series indicate changes in the underlying data source.

.. Not available

. Not applicable

Table 4.1

Primary, Secondary and Special Schools(1) (2) (3): Persistent Absentees (4)

2007/08

England

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Primary Schools (1)

Number of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees (4)(5)

..

60,960

56,750

Total number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

3,463,120

3,412,000

Percentage of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees

..

1.8

1 7

Percentage of half days missed by persistent absentees due to (6)

Authorised Absence

..

2222

21.46

Unauthorised Absence

..

7,82

849

Overall absence

..

3003

2995

Percentage of absence for which persistent absentees are responsible (7)

Authorised Absence

..

84

7.6

Unauthorised Absence

..

26.4

24.8

Overall absence

..

10.3

9.5

Secondary Schools (1)(2)

Number of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees (4)(5)

217,390

203,180

168,140

Total number of pupil enrolments (5)

3,056,330

3,042,080

2,989,290

Percentage of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees

7.1

67

5.6

Percentage of half days missed by persistent absentees due to (6)

Authorised Absence

23.21

22.41

21.14

Unauthorised Absence

12.26

13.86

15.38

Overall absence

35.48

3627

36.52

Percentage of absence for which persistent absentees are responsible (7)

Authorised Absence

24.0

23.5

20.1

Unauthorised Absence

60.9

609

57.6

Overall absence

30.4

30.7

27.7

Special Schools (3)

Number of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees (4)(5)

..

8,820

8,450

Total number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

77,230

77,400

Percentage of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees

..

11.4

109

Percentage of half days missed by persistent absentees due to (6)

Authorised Absence

..

29.27

29.12

Unauthorised Absence

..

12.95

13.85

Overall absence

..

42,22

42.97

Percentage of absence for which persistent absentees are responsible (7)

Authorised Absence

..

41.6

40.4

Unauthorised Absence

..

76.0

75.0

Overall absence

..

48.3

47.5

Total

Number of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees (4)(5)

..

272,950

233,340

Total number of pupil enrolments (5)

..

6,582,430

6,478,700

Percentage of pupil enrolments that are persistent absentees

..

4.1

3.6

Percentage of half days missed by persistent absentees due to (6)

Authorised Absence

..

22.59

21 .50

Unauthorised Absence

..

12.48

13.64

Overall absence

..

35.07

35.15

Percentage of absence for which persistent absentees are responsible (7)

Authorised Absence

..

17.1

14.6

Unauthorised Absence

..

51.8

48.3

Overall absence

..

22.5

20.1

Source: School Census

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed.

(2) Includes maintained secondary schools, city technology colleges and academies (including all-through academies).

(3) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools. Excludes general hospital schools.

(4) Persistent Absentees are defined as having more than 63 sessions of absence (authorised and unauthorised) during the year, typically over 20 per cent overall absence rate.

(5) Number of pupil enrolments in schools from start of the school year to 23 May 2008. Includes pupils on the school roll for at least one session who are aged between 5 and 15, excluding boarders. Some pupils may be counted more than once (if they moved schools during the school year or are registered in more than one school). See Notes to Editors 11 to 13.

(6) The number of sessions missed due to authorised/unauthorised/overall absence expressed as a percentage of the total number of possible sessions.

(7) The total number of sessions missed due to authorised/unauthorised/overall absence by persistent absentees expressed as a percentage of the total number of sessions missed due to authorised/unauthorised/overall absence by all pupil enrolments.

.. Not available

Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Senior Salaries Review Body

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the annual salaries, bonuses and payment per day of each member of the Senior Salaries Review Body. [HL1285]

Sexual Abuse: Northern Ireland

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Police Service of Northern Ireland was first alerted to alleged child sexual abuse by Liam Adams; whether the decision not to seek a European arrest warrant was the responsibility of the Police Service of Northern Ireland or the Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland; and whether the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland or any Northern Ireland Office ministers or advisers were alerted to and consulted on the issue by the Police Service of Northern Ireland or the Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland. [HL936]

It would be inappropriate for me to comment on any application for a European arrest warrant as this is an ongoing police investigation.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government who was the Chief Constable at the time when the Police Service of Northern Ireland was first alerted to alleged child sexual abuse by Liam Adams; how many subsequent meetings, for any purpose, the Chief Constable had with Gerry Adams; and whether the allegation was raised or discussed between them. [HL937]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will ask the Northern Ireland Policing Board to conduct a full inquiry into how the Police Service of Northern Ireland dealt with allegations of sexual abuse by Liam Adams. [HL938]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions took place between the Police Service of Northern Ireland and An Garda Síochána about the alleged sexual abuse by Liam Adams; whether the issuing of a European arrest warrant was discussed; and what other child security measures were discussed. [HL939]

These are operational matters for the Chief Constable. I have asked him to reply directly to the noble Lord, and a copy of his letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions about alleged sexual abuse by Liam Adams have taken place between the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, other Northern Ireland Office ministers and advisers, and their counterparts in the Republic of Ireland. [HL940]

UK Border Agency: Staff

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the remit of the Central Stakeholder Team of the Communications Directorate of the UK Border Agency; and how many staff are employed in it. [HL1025]

The central stakeholder team currently comprises nine full-time and one part-time staff. These staff:

work with stakeholders to promote compliance with immigration and customs requirements and to facilitate legitimate travel and trade;

develop ongoing relationships and consult stakeholders in order to inform policy development, services, decision making and planning;

facilitate visits to agency facilities and services by parliamentarians, diplomatic visitors and other stakeholders; and

develop the capacity of staff across the agency to work effectively with our stakeholders.

UK: EU Resident Citizens

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many citizens of each other European Union state are resident in the United Kingdom. [HL1090]

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, Director-General for Office for National Statistics, to Lord Wallace of Saltaire, dated January 2010.

As Director-General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to respond to your Question asking how many citizens of each other EU states are resident in the United Kingdom. (HL 1090)

The Office for National Statistics collects data on nationality on the Annual Population Survey (APS) which covers residents of the UK. The latest estimates available are for the 12 month period of April 2008 to March 2009. The estimates of the number of UK residents for each other EU member state are given in Table 1 attached.

Estimated population resident in the United Kingdom, by EU27 nationality3,4,5

April 2008 to March 2009

United Kingdom

thousands

Nationality

Estimate

Cl +/-

Poland

499

a

30

Republic of Ireland

342

a

24

France

121

b

15

Germany

104

b

13

Italy

96

b

13

Portugal

89

b

12

Lithuania

68

b

11

Spain

68

b

11

Slovakia

48

b

9

Netherlands

47

b

9

Romania

46

b

9

Bulgaria

30

c

7

Greece

27

C

7

Latvia

27

c

7

Sweden

24

c

6

Czech Republic

23

c

6

Hungary

19

c

6

Denmark

19

c

6

Austria

16

c

5

Belgium

14

c

5

Cyprus (EU)

12

c

5

Finland

10

d

4

Malta

6

d

3

Estonia

5

d

3

Slovenia

1

d

1

Luxembourg

:

d

:

Former Czechoslovakia

2

d

2

“:” = negligible or rounded to zero

Statistical Robustness1

a

05= CV <5

Estimates are considered precise

b

5= CV <10

Estimates are reasonably precise

c

10= CV <20

Estimates are considered acceptable

d

CV =20

Estimates are not considered reliable for practical purposes

Source: Annual Population Survey (APS)/Labour Force Survey (LFS), ONS

Notes:

1. Standard error is an estimate of the margin of error associated with a sample survey. The coefficient of variation (CV) indicates the robustness of each estimate. It is defined as:

2. Cl+/- is the upper (+) and lower (-) 95% confidence limits. It is defined as: 1.96 x standard error

3. Estimates are based on the Annual Population Survey (APS) which is the Labour Force Survey (LFS) plus various sample boosts.

4. It should be noted that the LFS:

excludes students in halls who do not have a UK resident parent

excludes people inmost other types of communal establishments (for example, hotels, boarding houses, hostels, mobile home sites etc)

is grossed to population estimates of those living in private households that only include migrants staying for 12 months or more.

5. The LFS weighting does not adjust for non-response bias by the nationality variable.

Young Offenders Institutions: Social Workers

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many social work posts in young offender institutions are vacant. [HL1129]

There are currently 22.5 social worker posts in young offender institutions and dedicated units for young women. Ten and a half of these are vacant.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made in agreeing a formula for local authorities to fund social work posts in young offender institutions. [HL1130]

It is the statutory duty of local authorities to provide social work services under the Children Act 1989 to young people in custody. We are continuing to work with the Youth Justice Board and other key stakeholders to develop long-term, sustainable arrangements which will ensure the future of these important social work posts.