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Written Answers

Volume 717: debated on Wednesday 3 March 2010

Written Answers

Wednesday 3 March 2010

Agriculture: Pollution

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what caused the increase of over 50 per cent in incidents of serious pollution from agriculture shown in the joint National Statistics and Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs publication The Environment in your Pocket 2009. [HL2183]

In 2008, February and June had unusually high numbers of incidents, with June being outside the range normally expected. These incidents raised the total and were caused by storage and control failure leading to slurry and silage releases. There were also a number of waste- related incidents. Inadequate and poorly maintained slurry and silage storage facilities are the most likely reason for the increase.

Armed Forces: Afghanistan

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Ministry of Defence, Kevan Jones, on 8 December 2009 (Official Report, Commons, col. 202W), what steps are being taken by the Ministry of Defence to improve energy efficiency at forward operations bases in Afghanistan. [HL2230]

The work outlined in the comprehensive response given by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence, on 8 December 2009 (Official Report, col. 201W) in another place to the honourable Member Commons for Bexhill and Battle (Gregory Barker), is continuing. This includes considering a number of options and proposals that could improve the energy efficiency of forward operating bases in Afghanistan. This work is at an early stage.

Armed Forces: Official Residences

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what guests were entertained at the official service residence of the Chief of the Defence Staff during 2009 who were (a) royalty, (b) Ministers, (c) other senior officers, (d) MPs, (e) overseas visitors, and (f) other VIPs. [HL2126]

The numbers of guests entertained at the official service residence of the Chief of the Defence Staff during 2009 are as follows:

Category

Number

Royalty

0

Ministers

2

Other Senior Officers

14

MPs

3

Overseas Visitors

14

Other VIPs

71

Buying Solutions

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was paid by the Cabinet Office and its agencies to (a) PricewaterhouseCoopers, (b) KPMG, (c) Deloitte, (d) Ernst and Young, (e) Grant Thornton, (f) BDO Stoy Hayward, (g) Baker Tilly, (h) Smith and Williamson, (i) Tenon Group, (j) PKF, (k) McKinsey and Company, and (I) Accenture, in each of the past five years for which information is available; how they monitor contracts with those firms; and how the department reports (1) during, and (2) at the end of contracts, to Buying Solutions. [HL2080]

The amount that the Cabinet Office paid to (a) PricewaterhouseCoopers, (b) KPMG, (c) Deloitte, (d) Ernst & Young, (e) Grant Thornton, (f) BDO Stoy Hayward, (g) Baker Tilly, (h) Smith and Williamson, (i) Tenon Group, (j) PKF, (k) McKinsey and Company, and (I) Accenture in the financial years 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08 and 2008-09 is detailed in the table below:

Supplier

2005-06 (£)

2006-07 (£)

2007-08 (£)

2008-09 (£)

PricewaterhouseCoopers

346,649

391,133

1,121,023

594,914

KPMG

166,509

223,061

129,641

198,558

Deloitte

304,264

18,037

-

425,249

Ernst & Young

-

-

47,000

38,642

Grant Thornton

-

-

-

-

BDO Stoy Hayward

-

-

-

-

Baker Tilly

-

-

-

-

Smith and Williamson

-

-

-

-

Tenon Group

-

-

-

-

PKF

-

-

-

-

McKinsey and Company

111,625

-

-

264,375

Accenture

67,717

282,210

172,807

-

The Cabinet Office's financial systems do not provide accurate and comprehensive data on expenditure by supplier prior to 2005-06. All the costs in the above table are inclusive of VAT, except where VAT is reclaimable.

All Cabinet Office contracts are managed by the relevant management unit within the department which commissioned the services. The contract managers within the appropriate management unit are responsible for ensuring that suppliers meet the terms and conditions of the contract and provide good value for money.

Buying Solutions’ frameworks are self-managed. Therefore when the Cabinet Office uses Buying Solutions’ frameworks, there is no obligation to report on a firm’s performance to Buying Solutions either during or at the end of the contract.

Community Heroes Reception

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) who attended the community heroes reception at 10 Downing Street, and (b) in what constituencies they reside. [HL2198]

The information that is being asked for are personal data. We consider that the disclosure of these personal data would be incompatible with the Department for Communities and Local Government's obligations under the Data Protection Act 1998.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much the community heroes reception recently hosted by 10 Downing Street cost. [HL2283]

Guidance to Ministers on the use of government property is set out in Section 6 of the Ministerial Code. No costs were attributed to the public purse.

Extremism

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many criticisms, and from what categories of persons and groups, they have received about their Prevent strategy; and what conclusions they draw. [HL2177]

We have sought a wide range of comment and feedback on our Prevent strategy including from members of the public, academics, community groups and delivery partners.

We consider that there is broad support for Prevent and that the strategy remains correct. We will continue to build and develop the strategy and its delivery on the ground.

Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what the prescribed criteria are for the selection of groups, causes and organisations to receive funding from the Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund. [HL2325]

The Faith Communities Capacity Building Fund closed in 2008. It was aimed at all local, regional and national faith-based and inter-faith organisations in England and Wales able to meet one or more of the priorities of the fund.

My department is considering options for building the capacity of faith community representative organisations to engage with Government and my right honourable friend the Secretary of State will make an announcement shortly.

Fishing: Vessels

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many British-owned (a) onshore fishing vessels, and (b) offshore fishing vessels, were registered in the United Kingdom at 31 December in each year since 1980. [HL2103]

The Marine and Fisheries Agency has provided the data requested (produced on a UK basis); these are shown in the table below. I assume the noble Lord is defining “onshore” as those UK fishing vessels less than or equal to 10 metres in overall length (under-10m) and “offshore” as those over 10 metres in length (over-10m).

Vessel data for 31 December 1980 to 31 December 1989 are available only in terms of those vessels under and over 40 feet in length, rather than 10 metres, and relate to the active rather than the registered UK fishing fleet. The data for 1990 onwards reflect the registered UK fishing fleet divided between those vessels under-10m and those over-10m. The statistics for the active fleet given for 31 December 1989 and earlier years understate the overall size of the fleet; the registered fleet exceeded the active fleet by about 3,000 vessels in 1991, when the earlier statistical series was replaced.

Number of Active UK fishing vessels

Details as at 31 December

40 ft and under

Over 40 ft

Total

1980

4,512

2,383

6,895

1981

4,970

2,381

7,351

1982

4,485

2,312

6,797

1983

4,767

2,207

6,974

1984

5,433

2,151

7,584

1985

5,868

2,052

7,920

1986

6,305

1,861

8,166

1987

6,251

1,953

8,204

1988

6,128

2,004

8,132

1989

6,326

1,957

8,283

Number of Registered UK fishing vessels

Details as at 31 December

10m and under

Over 10m

Total

1990

7,364

3,825

11,189

1991

7,538

3,873

11,411

1992

7,831

3,730

11,561

1993

8,128

3,564

11,692

1994

7,607

3,220

10,827

1995

6,757

2,963

9,720

1996

6,091

2,576

8,667

1997

6,022

2,436

8,458

1998

6,027

2,244

8,271

1999

5,916

2,123

8,039

2000

5,769

2,049

7,818

2001

5,713

2,008

7,721

2002

5,773

1,805

7,578

2003

5,412

1,684

7,096

2004

5,394

1,628

7,022

2005

5,134

1,582

6,716

2006

5,203

1,549

6,752

2007

5,236

1,527

6,763

2008

5,077

1,496

6,573

Government Departments: Staffing

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether assessments are made of the net cost or saving to public funds of redundancies of staff in government departments before decisions are made on proposed redundancies. [HL2226]

Individual departments have delegated responsibility for staffing matters, subject to the requirements of the Civil Service Management Code. Among other things, the code requires departments and agencies to consider all measures which might avoid or minimise the need for compulsory redundancy. In addition, the accounting officer (normally the Permanent Secretary or chief executive) has personal responsibility for ensuring that the resources entrusted to him or her by Parliament are used efficiently, economically and effectively. In the event of redundancy, the terms that departments may pay are set out in the Civil Service Compensation Scheme.

Government Departments: Websites

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what greetings have been posted on the website of Communities and Local Government to adherents of each of the major religions of the world during the past 12 months. [HL2212]

In the past 12 months my department has posted ministerial video messages on the departmental website to mark festivals of the five numerically largest religions represented in the UK—Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism and Judaism.

Government: Office Equipment

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the average purchase price, excluding value added tax, of a 500-sheet ream of white A4 80 gsm photocopier paper paid by the Treasury Solicitor's Department in the latest period for which figures are available; and how much it spent in total on photocopier paper in the last year for which figures are available. [HL2298]

The Treasury Solicitor’s department has purchased 500-sheet reams of white A4 80gsm photocopier paper at an average price (exclusive of value added tax) of £1.71 per ream; the department spent £53,804.20 (exclusive of value added tax) in the financial year 2008-09 on photocopier paper. All paper was sourced via Banner Office Supplies which is on the OGC approved frameworks and, in terms of sustainability, meets the Government specifications outlined in the Buy Sustainable—Quick Wins guidance.

Greyhound Board of Great Britain

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government with regard to the draft Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, whether the Greyhound Board of Great Britain has yet received United Kingdom Accreditation Service accreditation; and, if not, when the outcome of its application will be known. [HL2270]

The Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) has not yet received United Kingdom Accreditation Service accreditation. However, we understand the GBGB is far advanced with its accreditation that process and is on schedule to obtain full accreditation before the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 come into force on 6 April this year.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government with regard to the draft Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, who sits on the Greyhound Board of Great Britain. [HL2271]

The Greyhound Board of Great Britain is not a statutory body and we do not keep details of the membership of its board.

Housing: Construction

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by the Minister of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change, Joan Ruddock, on 12 November 2009 (Official Report, Commons, 668W), whether the Homes and Communities Agency keeps a record of the ages of appliances replaced; and, if so, whether it is summarised and published. [HL2184]

While the Homes and Communities Agency administers the renewable construction demonstration project (RCDP), it has no involvement in the delivery or monitoring of the CERT (carbon emissions reduction target) carbon saving obligation on energy suppliers, and it is through CERT (rather than RCDP) that energy suppliers subsidise the cost of the most efficient domestic appliances through appliance trade-in schemes.

Immigration

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much has the Migration Impacts Fund raised in each year since its inception. [HL2138]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding from the Migration Impacts Fund has been allocated to each local authority since its inception. [HL2139]

Since the inception of the Migration Impact Fund in April 2009, it has provided a total of £23,581,305 to local authorities in England in the 2009-10 financial year and will provide a further £22,099,223 in 2010-11. The allocations to each local authority (per year) are set out in the table below:

Migration Impact Fund—Local Authority funding 2009-10 and 2010-11

Authority

Total 2009-10

Total 2010-11

Suffolk County Council

428,362

425,804

Peterborough City Council

354,832

337,030

Norfolk County Council

183,600

186,000

Cambridgeshire County Council

403,500

364,525

Breckland Council

220,000

30,000

Borough Council of Kings Lynn and West Norfolk

85,000

85,000

Hertfordshire County Council

264,000

277,000

Harlow Council

220,000

190,000

Luton Borough Council

272,500

317,000

Derby City Council

500,000

450,000

Leicester City Council

100,000

85,000

Lincolnshire County Council

854,000

875,000

Nottinghamshire County Council

210,000

10,000

Nottingham City Council

346,836

366,874

Haringey Council

297,275

324,350

Enfield Council

258,000

258,000

London Borough of Barnet

234,844

104,344

Camden Council

241,500

260,000

London Borough of Hackney

143,760

143,760

Islington Council

90,000

90,000

Westminster City Council

270,000

365,000

Merton Council

158,000

158,000

The Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames

102,441

102,441

London Borough of Lewisham

50,000

50,000

Sutton Council

43,636

23,636

London Borough of Croydon

150,000

150,000

London Borough of Lambeth

123,900

123,900

London Borough of Southwark

294,303

300,085

Wandsworth Borough Council

98,000

95,000

London Borough of Barking and Dagenham

84,000

106,000

London Borough of Newham

179,000

98,000

London Borough of Redbridge

84,000

107,450

The City of London

217,000

217,000

London Borough of Tower Hamlets

60.600

60,600

Waltham Forest Council

138,137

43,000

Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

63.000

38,000

Harrow Council

121,500

123,160

London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham

198,000

198,000

London Borough of Brent

133,000

154,000

London Borough of Ealing

350,000

350,000

London Borough of Hounslow

218,000

215,300

London Borough of Hillingdon

273,496

273,496

London Borough of Greenwich

145,000

145,000

London Borough of Havering

100,000

50,000

North Tyneside Council

111,400

111,400

Sunderland City Council

20,000

n/a

Hartlepool Borough Council

40,000

55,000

Gateshead Council

60,000

120,000

Newcastle City Council

181,166

108,648

Middlesbrough Council

74,095

122,675

Northumberland County Council

380,591

291,240

Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

104,042

94,821

Bury Metropolitan Borough Council

87,000

87,000

Bolton Metropolitan Borough Council

105,000

n/a

Manchester City Council

550,000

550,000

Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council

156,550

161,247

Salford City Council

159,135

100,627

Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council

55,000

5,000

Liverpool City Council

320,000

320,000

Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council

342,000

309,000

Wirral Borough Council

150,261

139,908

Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council

225,297

154,818

Blackpool Council

65,000

65,000

Lancashire County Council

258,964

135,410

Lancaster City Council

40,086

58,463

Cumbria County Council

250,000

237,000

East Sussex County Council

344,513

332,023

Brighton and Hove City Council

151,880

75,950

Reading Borough Council

221,750

n/a

Bracknell Forest Borough Council

15,000

15,000

Southampton City Council

480,000

480,000

Slough Borough Council

490,000

790,000

Portsmouth City Council

184,813

248,225

Kent County Council

352,000

257,000

Thanet District Council

70,000

90,000

Rushmoor Borough Council

115,000

75,000

Medway Council

391,103

300,074

Plymouth City Council

468,000

468,000

Cornwall Council

416,777

370,900

Swindon Borough Council

280,000

290,000

Devon County Council

459,700

330,000

Bournemouth Borough Council

290,000

190,000

Somerset County Council

314,094

551,045

Bristol City Council

739,982

763,965

Telford and Wrekin Council

183,500

61,500

Stoke on Trent City Council

85,443

78,732

Warwickshire County Council

288,006

175,000

Wychavon District Council

258,600

344,600

Birmingham City Council

362,550

347,050

Staffordshire County Council

275,000

275,000

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

250,000

250,000

Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council

124,999

125,000

East Staffordshire Borough Council

75,000

75,000

Stafford Borough Council

25,000

50,000

Wolverhampton City Council

54,770

50,045

East Riding of Yorkshire Council

153,644

89,484

North Lincolnshire Council

82,143

82,143

North Yorkshire County Council

118,400

118,652

City of Wakefield Metropolitan Borough Council

116,592

183,366

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council

171,400

213,000

Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council

133,038

169,457

Calderdale Council

215,000

205,000

Sheffield City Council

400,000

400,000

Leeds City Council

375,000

375,000

Kirklees Council

225,000

225,000

Bradford Metropolitan Borough Council

425,000

325,000

Doncaster Council

150,000

150,000

Kingston Upon Hull City Council

150,000

150,000

Total

23,581,306

22,099,223

Immigration: Deportation

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they are making towards deporting foreign offenders sentenced to deportation as soon as their prison sentences are completed. [HL1646]

The UK Border Agency makes every effort to ensure that a foreign national prisoner’s removal by deportation coincides, as far as possible, with his or her release from prison on completion of sentence. Where sentence length allows, consideration of an individual’s case will be commenced 18 months prior to the earliest point of release.

All foreign nationals subject to removal will be considered by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) under the early removals scheme (ERS), which allows for early removal up to a maximum of 270 days prior to the halfway point of the sentence, subject to the serving of a requisite period. Since 2007, the UKBA has removed in excess of 15,000 foreign national prisoners. Approximately 25 per cent of these removals occurred under the ERS.

National Insurance

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many electors with the same national insurance number appear on both the electoral register for the South Belfast constituency and that of Fermanagh and South Tyrone; and how many appear more than once in Northern Ireland constituency registers. [HL2116]

The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) does not hold copies of the electoral register for any constituency in Northern Ireland. The Chief Electoral Officer for Northern Ireland is responsible for maintaining the electoral register there and the noble Lord may wish to make inquiries relating to the register to the Chief Electoral Officer directly.

Nuclear Disarmament

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government who will be representing the United Kingdom at the United Nations nuclear security summit in Washington in April; and what outcomes they will be seeking at that summit. [HL2151]

The Prime Minister plans to attend the nuclear security summit in Washington DC in April.

The Government set out their aspirations for nuclear security in last summer’s Road to 2010 White Paper. Consistent with that vision, the UK will be seeking to: increase international awareness of the threat posed by nuclear terrorism; agree a robust set of guiding principles for nuclear security that will set the tone for developing international norms over the coming decades; secure commitment by participating nations to undertake a wide range of actions, domestically and in collaboration with other states, to improve the security of fissile material and sensitive information, and to prevent them from falling into the hands of malicious actors.

Olympic Games 2012: Bicycles

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government why the supply of bicycles for use by athletes and officials at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was not put to competitive tender. [HL1902]

To ask Her Majesty's Government where the BMW bicycles for use by athletes and officials at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be manufactured. [HL1903]

The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) competitively tendered for the automobile partner sponsorship category. The successful company, BMW, included in its deal a small number of bicycles for use by both elite athletes and LOCOG staff at Games time. This was in addition to a significant financial contribution towards LOCOG's budget for staging the Games. The production of the bicycles is likely to be within the EU.

LOCOG is responsible for staging the London 2012 Games, and needs to raise its £2 billion budget through sponsorship, tickets, merchandise and licensing and media rights.

Post Office: Banking

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what response they have received to their consultation on post office banking services; and when the consultation closes. [HL2313]

Post Office: Closures

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will ensure that no further post offices are closed in villages and towns without commercial banks until arrangements are made for widespread post office banking. [HL2312]

The Government will not support a further programme of post office closures, and will continue to subsidise the non-commercial network beyond 2011. But neither the Government nor Post Office Ltd can prevent the closure of individual post offices where, for example, a sub-postmaster decides to retire or resign and a replacement cannot be found. In such cases Post Office Ltd will consider alternatives where possible, which may include one of the Outreach service options.

Schools: Teachers

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, teachers in primary schools have university degrees. [HL2144]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, head teachers in primary schools have university degrees. [HL2145]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, teachers in primary schools have first or second class honours degrees. [HL2146]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, head teachers in primary schools have first or second class honours degrees. [HL2147]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, teachers in primary schools have honours degrees in (1) English, (2) mathematics, (3) physics, (4) chemistry, and (5) biology. [HL2148]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, teachers in state-funded secondary schools have first or upper-second class honours degrees in (1) English, (2) mathematics, (3) physics, (4) chemistry, and (5) biology. [HL2206]

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many, and (b) what percentage of, teachers in state-funded secondary schools in 1999 had first or upper-second class honours degrees in (1) English, (2) mathematics, (3) physics, (4) chemistry, and (5) biology. [HL2207]

Shipping: Piracy

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any British-registered or British-owned ships are being used in support of piratical operations. [HL2213]

It is understood that the UK flagged ship “Asian Glory”, pirated on 1 January in the Somali Basin, has been used to support other ships under pirate control from its anchorage in Heredeere. The European Union Naval Force in Somalia (EU NAVFOR) confirmed that the ship has now returned to its anchorage and remains under the control of pirates

Stateless People

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures are in place to reduce the number of stateless people in the United Kingdom. [HL2119]

There are several provisions in British nationality law which provide for the acquisition of citizenship by a stateless person. These enable us to meet our obligations under the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness.

Since 1 January 1983 a child born in the United Kingdom will only be a British citizen if either parent is a British citizen or settled in the United Kingdom. The British Nationality Act 1981 therefore contains provisions by which children born here can register as British citizens, either once a parent becomes British or settled, or following a period of residence in the United Kingdom.

There are also provisions by which stateless children born outside the United Kingdom after 1983 can be registered as British citizens if a parent holds a form of British Nationality.

A person who has remained stateless since the British Nationality Act 1981 came into force is entitled to registration in certain circumstances.

There are no specific provisions in place to cover those who have come to the UK but do not hold the nationality of another country. Adults who have come to the United Kingdom as stateless refugees are able to apply for naturalisation in the same way as any other applicant, on the basis of a period of residence here. The residence requirements for naturalisation exist to allow a person to demonstrate a close and continuing personal connection with the United Kingdom, irrespective of their current nationality.

Sustainable Communities Act 2007

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will decide on which economic, social and environmental well-being projects will be implemented under round one of the Sustainable Communities Act 2007; and how many they intend to approve. [HL2224]

The Government are consulting the Local Government Association (LGA) in its role as selector under the Sustainable Communities Act 2007 and are seeking to reach agreement on which of the 199 shortlisted proposals should be implemented. Many of the proposals are complex and raise significant practical issues but the Government are anxious to make progress as quickly as possible on those proposals that offer practical benefits and new ways of meeting local needs.

Taxation: Non-domiciled Taxpayers

Question

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many taxpayers who are registered with HM Revenue and Customs as non-domiciled are (a) resident, and (b) non-resident, in the United Kingdom. [HL1128]

Reliable information is not available, as individuals are not required to report their UK domicile status or residence status to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) unless either is relevant to their liability to UK tax within that year.

Non-domiciled UK residents

Individuals who are resident but not domiciled within the UK (non-domiciles) do not need to inform HMRC of their non-domicile status unless it is relevant to their tax affairs in that tax year.

In the majority of cases an individual’s domicile status will make no difference to the direct tax they must pay in the UK. This is because an individual’s domicile status is mainly relevant for income and capital gains tax purposes when an individual has foreign income or foreign gains, for example from overseas investment or employment. Where this is the case, UK residents may need to complete supplementary pages to the main self-assessment tax return. Many such residents pay tax on these income and gains on the arising basis so their domicile status is not relevant to their tax affairs. However UK resident individuals who are either not ordinarily resident or are not domiciled within the UK may use the remittance basis in respect of their foreign income or gains instead.

Following the changes introduced in the Finance Act 2008, many of these individuals will now have to complete a self-assessment tax return to use the remittance basis (with some minor exceptions for lower-income or migrant workers).

Prior to the Finance Act 2008 it was not always necessary for individuals using the remittance basis to complete a self-assessment tax return. Similarly those individuals who did complete a self-assessment tax return did not always need to say whether they were using the remittance basis because they were non-domiciled in the UK or because they are not ordinarily resident in the UK. In 2006-07, 86,000 individuals filed a self-assessment tax return on the basis that they were non-domiciled in the UK. This is the latest year for which data are available.

UK residents who are non-domiciled may also make lifetime transfers into trusts with inheritance tax due at 20 per cent. To do so, they must inform HMRC of their domicile status. This information is not centrally collated by HMRC’s systems.

Non-domiciled non-UK residents

With some minor exceptions non-UK residents do not generally pay UK capital gains tax. They pay UK tax on their UK source income, although this may be relieved under a double taxation treaty. There is generally no need for such individuals to inform HMRC about their domicile status; the remittance basis is only relevant to UK residents.

Some non-resident individuals will complete the non-residence pages of a self-assessment tax return and declare their non-resident status. There is usually no need for such individuals to declare their domicile status too, although on occasion some do choose to tick the non-domicile box. In 2006-07 30,000 taxpayers chose to declare themselves as non-resident and non-domiciled in the UK.

These individuals will broadly fall into five groups: those who are not resident in the UK but have investments here on which UK tax must be paid; those who have returned abroad from a UK employment assignment and have to file to pay tax on their final year salary; those with UK-source self-employment income from business trips (particularly if they come from a country with which we do not have a double taxation agreement); those performing in the UK as non-resident artistes or sportspersons; and those who are making claims under double taxation treaties.

Visas

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how long it takes for a citizen of Pakistan to receive a visa for travel to the United Kingdom. [HL1852]

In January 2010, the majority of Pakistani visa applications (70 per cent) were processed in 15 working days, and 89 per cent were processed within 30 days. We continue to work to maintain and improve on our customer service standards.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Lord West of Spithead on 8 February (WA 102), whether they will keep information that distinguishes students applying for visas to attend (a) private colleges accredited by private accreditation services approved by the UK Border Agency, and (b) universities and colleges in the public sector. [HL2053]

The UK Border Agency keeps details of the proposed educational institution on individual student visa application records. However, we have no plans to modify our visa processing systems to provide a breakdown of student visas by public/private colleges.