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Immigration

Volume 718: debated on Monday 8 March 2010

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many migrants from outside the European Economic Area entered the United Kingdom in each of the last three years. [HL2196]

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, National Statistician, to Baroness Warsi, dated March 2010.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to respond to your recent parliamentary question concerning how many migrants from outside the European Economic Area entered the United Kingdom in each of the last three years (HL2196).

Official estimates of long-term immigration of non-EEA citizens into the UK for 2006 to 2008 are given in the table below.

Immigrants into the UK who were non-EEA citizens, 2006 to 2008

Year

Non-EEACitizens1

2006

315,000

2007

281,000

2008

277,000

1 For 2006 non-EEA includes Bulgaria and Romania Figures for 2007 and 2008 exclude Bulgaria and Romania

An international migrant is defined as someone who changes their country of usual residence for at least a year so that the country of destination effectively becomes the country of usual residence.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government (a) how many businesses were fined for employing an illegal immigrant in each of the last three years, and (b) how much was each fine. [HL2197]

The accompanying table sets out the number of civil penalties issued and the average and maximum fine (it is not practical to list the amount of each fine because of the numbers involved) imposed by the UK Border Agency for the period 1 March 2008 to 24 February 2010 and the number of fines issued in criminal courts for 2006 to 2008.

These data are derived from local management information and are therefore provisional and liable to change. Employers against whom civil penalties have been issued by the UK Border Agency for the last three months including the amount of civil penalty imposed can be found on the UK Border Agency website at: www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/employersandsponsors/listemployers penalties/

This is updated quarterly.

Data on the number of defendants proceeded against and found guilty in 2007 and 2008, of offences relating to employing a person subject to immigration control, are published by the Home Office in table 3.4 of the Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom 2008, which is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate website at: www.home office.gov.uk/rds/immigration-asylum-stats.html

Data for 2008 remain provisional and subject to change. Data for 2009 will be published in summer 2010.

Civil penalties Issued for employing illegal worker(1), 1 March 2008-24 February 2010*

2008

2009

2010

Average civil penalty

9,652

10,073

9,246

Maximum civil penalty(2)

95,000

165,000

61,250

Number of civil penalties issued

1,168

2,271

428

(1) Civil penalties issued under Section 15 of the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006

(2) Civil penalties can be up to £10,000 per illegal worker

* These figures have been drawn from a UK Border Agency management information system.

Figures provided from this source do not constitute part of National Statistics and should be treated as provisional.

Fines issued in criminal courts for employing an Illegal worker(3) by amount of fine(3), 2006-20084(4)**

2006

2007

2008

£l -£500

3

13

9

£501-£1000

1

6

12

£1001-£2500

2

3

13

£2501-£5000

1

1

0

Over £5000

0

0

1

(3) Offences under S.8 Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 or S.21 Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006

(4) Data for 2009 will become available once 'Sentencing Statistics 2009' is published in the autumn

(5) The statutory maximum fine for an offender sentenced at the magistrates' court is £5,000. There is no statutory maximum fine for an offender sentenced at the Crown court

**These figures have been drawn from administrative data systems.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system

This data is presented on the principal offence basis. Where an offender has been sentenced for more than one offence the principal offence is the one for which the heaviest sentence was imposed. Where the same sentence has been imposed for two or more offences the principal offence is the one for which the statutory maximum is most severe.

Source: Justice Statistics—Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice

Ref: SENT(JSAS)055-10 (26/02/2010)

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many United States citizens have been refused entry to the United Kingdom in each of the last five years; and on what grounds. [HL2337]

The table below provides information regarding a) the number of United States citizens refused entry to the United Kingdom in each of the last five years and b) the grounds for refusal.

Refusal Code

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Total

Reason Not Specified

142

150

133

141

106

672

Insufficient Means for Proposed Visit

9

9

12

15

30

75

Not Satisfied Genuine Visitor

1,070

1,298

1,419

1,953

2,126

7,866

Seeking free medical treatment/insufficient funds to meet cost of treatment

0

2

4

0

1

7

Unsatisfactory or unacceptable arrangements for Proposed Study

13

25

20

14

8

80

Intention to Study not Genuine and Realistic

11

8

6

7

6

38

Transit Passenger

24

26

21

54

58

183

For Employment without a Work permit

131

146

189

168

135

769

Work Permit Holder Refused

5

5

6

10

1

27

Medically Undesirable

0

1

1

8

0

10

Convicted of a Criminal Offence in the UK/Abroad

6

0

3

5

3

17

Subject to Deportation Order

2

2

4

4

0

12

Exclusion Conducive to the Public Good

9

10

6

19

11

55

No Passport or Acceptable ID Document

13

16

6

10

18

63

Spurious passport and not qualified for entry

1

0

0

0

0

1

Lack of returnability

1

1

0

2

1

5

Lack of required non-settlement entry clearance

201

237

259

342

380

1,419

Lack of required settlement entry clearance

72

66

51

13

14

216

Returning Resident but not Qualified

0

3

1

2

1

7

Cancellation of entry clearance

6

2

7

7

8

30

Cancellation of Continuing Leave

1

3

5

9

16

34

Refused under Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2000

1

0

0

0

0

1

Other reasons

20

20

28

73

81

222

Grand Total

1,738

2,030

2,181

2,856

3,004

11,809

The information used to answer this question is taken from a live database and is suitable for management information purposes. It has therefore not been subject to the detailed checks required to qualify as National Statistics.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants have been found to be working for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and its agencies in each of the last five years. [HL2345]

People employed to work in government departments and their agencies, either directly or through a contractor, are required to satisfy requirements on identity, nationality and immigration status prior to the offer of employment.

My department has no record of having employed an illegal immigrant in the last five years.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants have been found to be working for HM Treasury and its agencies in each of the last five years. [HL2346]

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants have been found to be working for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, its predecessors and its agencies in each of the last five years. [HL2349]

People employed to work in government departments and their agencies, either directly or through a contractor, are required to satisfy requirements on identity, nationality and immigration status prior to the offer of employment.

My department has no record of having employed an illegal immigrant in the last five years.

I have asked the chief executives of the Executive agencies to respond directly to the noble Baroness.

Letter from Stephen Speed, The Insolvency Service, to Baroness Warsi, dated March 2010.

The Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), has asked me to reply to your question regarding the number of staff appointed in the Insolvency Service since 2005 who were later found to be illegal immigrants.

The Insolvency Service has not appointed any staff since 2005 who were later found to be illegal immigrants.

Letter from John Alty, Intellectual Property Office, to Baroness Warsi, dated 1 March 2010.

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question above, tabled 24 February 2010.

The Intellectual Property Office has not employed any illegal immigrants over the past five years. Our recruitment process enables the office to identify applicants who are subject to immigration controls through the various questions we ask and the documentation we check.

Letter from Gareth Jones, Companies House, to Baroness Warsi.

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 24 February 2010, HL 2349, to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

No illegal immigrants have been found to be working for Companies House in the last five years.

Letter from Peter Mason, National Measurement Office, to Baroness Warsi, dated 3 March 2010.

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question asking Her Majesty's Government how many illegal immigrants have been found to be working for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, its predecessors and its agencies in each of the last five years.

NMO has not had any illegal immigrants working for the agency in the last five years.