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Health: Contaminated Blood Products

Volume 718: debated on Tuesday 6 April 2010

Questions

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many cases of transfusion-transmitted infections have been reported in each year since the inception of the United Kingdom Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance programme in 2006; what were the infectious organisms; and how many fatalities have occurred. [HL3085]

Reports of suspected transfusion-transmitted infections are made to both the NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT)/Health Protection Agency (HPA) Epidemiology Unit and to the Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) scheme. Data are collated by the NHSBT/HPA Epidemiology Unit.

The following table shows all transfusion-transmitted infections reported to either or both schemes between October 1996 (the inception of the SHOT scheme) and December 2009. Data to 2008 are also available in the SHOT Report 2008, published at www.shotuk.org.

The SHOT Report for 2009 will be published in July 2010.

Number of transfusion-transmitted infections reported to the NHSBT/HPA Epidemiology Unit and/or SHOT, by year of report and infection, October 1996 to December 2009. The total number of infected recipients is shown, with the number of those recipients having died shown in brackets.

Infection

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-2000

2000-01

2001-02

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Total

Bacteria

3

1(1)

6(2)

5(2)

4(1)

5

3(1)

2

2(1)

3

6(2)

3(1)

43(11)

Hepatitis A

1

1

1

3

Hepatitis B

1

2

2

2

1

2

1

11

Hepatitis C

1

1

2

Hepatitis E

1

1

HIV1

3

1

4

HTLV2

1

1

2

Malaria

1 (1)

1

1(1)

Prion3

1

1

vCJD

1(1)

1(1)

1(1)

3(3)

Total

10 (1)

3(1)

9(2)

7(2)

6(1)

6

9(2)

2

5(1)

3(2)

3

6(2)

3(1)

72(15)

Notes:

1 Human immunodeficiency virus

2 Human T-lymphotropic virus

3 Evidence of prion infection found at autopsy, death was from an unrelated cause.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government what measures they have taken to prevent transfusion-transmitted infections; and what consideration is given to emerging pathogens and those whose range will be extended by climate change. [HL3086]

All blood establishments must comply with the Blood Safety and Quality Regulations (2005), as amended. The principal measure to protect patients against transfusion-transmitted infections is the careful selection of blood donors, supplemented by methods to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination during the collection of blood, and specific testing for evidence of infections which can be transmitted by blood.

The UK blood services are advised on the risks to the United Kingdom blood supply from outbreaks of infection and emerging infections both within and outside the UK by a specialist committee, the Standing Advisory Committee on Transfusion Transmitted Infection (SACTTI). SACTTI has well established national and international links with other blood services and with communicable disease organisations such as the Health Protection Agency.

A list of general blood safety measures can be found on the website for the Joint Professional Advisory Committee to the United Kingdom Blood Transfusion Services at www.transfusionguidelines.org.uk/index.aspx? Publication=DL&Section=12&pageid=389.

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place in the Library of the House copies of the Department of Health memoranda from 1985 about patients with haemophilia who contracted HIV and hepatitis C from blood transfusions, as reported in the Guardian on 23 March. [HL3098]

The three documents quoted in the Guardian article of 23 March 2010 are publicly available on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Freedomofinformation/Freedomofinformationpublicationschemefeedback/FOIreleases/DH_076693

They can be found in the file marked “Vol.79 June 1978—February 1996”. The department is committed to releasing all relevant documents held from the period 1970 to 1985. Over 5,500 documents have been placed on the department’s website since 2006.