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House of Lords Hansard
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Enterprise Bill [HL]
19 April 2016
Volume 771

Commons Amendments

Motion on Amendments 1 to 11

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 1 to 11.

1: After Clause 16, insert the following new Clause—

“Power of Welsh Ministers to apply regulators’ principles and code of practice

In section 24 of the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006 (application of regulators’ principles and code of practice to functions specified by order)—

(a) for paragraph (c) of subsection (3) (Wales: limit on power of Minister of the Crown to specify functions) substitute—

“(c) a Welsh regulatory function.”;

(b) in subsection (4) (power of Welsh Ministers to specify functions) for “regulatory functions exercisable only in or as regards Wales” substitute “Welsh regulatory functions”;

(c) in subsection (10) (definitions) at the appropriate place insert—

““Welsh regulatory function” means a regulatory function, so far as exercisable in relation to Wales, if or to the extent that the function relates to matters—

(a) within the legislative competence of the National Assembly for Wales (see section 108 of the Government of Wales Act 2006), or

(b) in respect of which functions are exercisable by the Welsh Ministers.”.”

2: Clause 19, page 17, line 40, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

3: Clause 19, page 18, line 35, leave out “in Wales” and insert “in relation to Wales”

4: Clause 19, page 18, line 36, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

5: Clause 19, page 28, line 20, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

6: Clause 19, page 28, line 33, leave out “in Wales” and insert “in relation to Wales”

7: Clause 19, page 28, line 34, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

8: Clause 19, page 29, line 38, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

9: Clause 19, page 30, line 8, leave out “in Wales” and insert “in relation to Wales”

10: Clause 19, page 30, line 9, leave out “Welsh ministerial” and insert “devolved Welsh”

11: After Clause 19, insert the following new Clause—

“Devolved Welsh matters

(1) The Regulatory Enforcement and Sanctions Act 2008 is amended as follows.

(2) In each of the following provisions, for “Welsh ministerial” substitute “devolved Welsh”—

(a) in section 4 (meaning of “relevant function”), subsections (6) and (8)(b);

(b) in section 6 (guidance to local authorities), subsections (1) and (1A);

(c) in section 10 (advice to Welsh Ministers), subsection (1)(a);

(d) in section 12 (relationship between Secretary of State and other regulators), subsection (3);

(e) in section 16 (guidance or directions by Welsh Ministers), subsection (1);

(f) in section 36 (power to make orders providing for civil sanctions), subsection (2);

(g) in section 59 (consultation and consent for civil sanctions orders: Wales), subsection (2);

(h) in section 73 (functions to which duty not to impose or maintain unnecessary regulatory burdens applies), subsections (3)(c), (4)(c) and (5).

(3) In section 73 (functions to which section 72 applies), in subsections (3)(c) and (4)(c), for “in Wales” substitute “in relation to Wales”.

(4) In section 74 (general interpretation)—

(a) omit the definition of “Welsh ministerial matter”;

(b) before the definition of “Minister of the Crown” insert—

““devolved Welsh matter” means —

(a) a matter within the legislative competence of the National Assembly for Wales (see section 108 of the Government of Wales Act 2006), or

(b) a matter in relation to Wales in respect of which functions are exercisable by the Welsh Ministers,

and in this definition “Wales” has the same meaning as in the Government of Wales Act 2006;”.”

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My Lords, this Bill will strengthen the UK’s position as the best place in Europe to start and grow a business, and make sure people who work hard can succeed. When the Bill left this House for the other place, the noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, whom I see in his seat, rightly said that it was,

“certainly a better Bill than the one that arrived”.—[Official Report, 15/12/15; col. 1985.]

Today, we welcome the Bill back to this House with further improvements and amendments.

Let me begin with the pubs provisions—always a favourite subject, since the men in my family love a pint. As part 2 of the government consultation on the Pubs Code confirmed, we do not intend to frustrate access to the market rent only option. Amendment 28 improves Clause 33 on the MRO by amending Section 43 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act to put beyond doubt that MRO will be available at rent assessment, irrespective of the level at which the rent is set. This has now been reflected in the draft Pubs Code regulations, which were laid on 14 April. These also satisfy the concerns and commitments relating to pubs made during the passage of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act and at earlier stages of this Bill.

In particular, on parallel rent assessment, tenants can consider tied and MRO offers in parallel. Further, we have retained all the conditions in the Act that would entitle a tenant to request the MRO option. We said we would exempt genuine franchises from MRO, and we have done just that. Similarly, we have exempted tenancies at will and other short agreements that cumulatively last for no more than 12 months from most of the other provisions of the code, including from MRO. We have enabled pub-owning businesses and tied tenants to agree to defer for up to seven years the point at which MRO is available at a rent assessment and renewal, where the pub-owning business makes a significant investment. The minimum threshold for a significant investment is set at 200% of the pub’s dry rent.

Amendment 29 tidies up Clause 34, which addresses concerns that pub companies were changing their practice to avoid application of the pubs provisions in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act. These amendments make it clear: first, that potential unfair business practices occurring since the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act was passed in March 2015 are covered; secondly, that the adjudicator will report on avoidance of both the Act and the Pubs Code; and, thirdly, that territorial extent is in line with the SBEE Act pubs provisions.

The new Pubs Code Adjudicator, Paul Newby, has now been appointed and will take up post on 2 May, ahead of the Pubs Code coming into force. Mr Newby brings great experience of the sector and a reputation for professionalism. Let us give him the opportunity to show his worth.

I am very pleased with the progress that we have made on pubs in both Houses and, particularly, by working with stakeholders through the Pubs Code consultation. I look forward to a final discussion next month on the draft regulations, as Parliament considers the details of the code via the affirmative procedure.

The amendments in this group relating to Wales have been developed in agreement with the Welsh Government and will allow Wales to benefit from further or extended regulation-making powers in devolved areas in respect of the Regulators’ Code, the primary authority scheme and business rates.

Lastly, we come to the amendments to the extent and commencement clauses. I hope noble Lords will accept my assurance that these amendments are technical and need no further debate.

I commend all these amendments to the House and I beg to move.

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My Lords, I thank the Minister for the progress we have made in matters relating to pubs. Throughout the Bill’s progress, in both Houses of Parliament, we have seen the reversion of the original intention in the small business Act and have reinstated the parallel rent assessments; legislated for additional checks to ensure that pub companies do not game the code; reversed the decision to offer MRO conditional on there being an increase in rent; and ensured protection for tenants being offered investment in turn for opting out of MRO. I am tremendously grateful to the Minister for dealing with this extremely well and making sure that these amendments properly express what this House intended when it passed that amendment. I also congratulate the officials in the department, who have done a terrific job in restoring the balance that we hoped had been struck in the small business Act and making sure that these provisions are adequately catered for. We are tremendously grateful for that.

We welcome these amendments, but I will raise just a couple of technical issues on which I seek some clarity from the Minister. For the draft Pubs Code that has now been published, Regulation 3 states that every time a pub tenant wishes the adjudicator to be appointed to arbitrate on an MRO dispute, they must pay a fee of £200. Also, when an arbitration goes forward, there is the possibility of costs of up to £2,000 being awarded against tenants. We understand that this is to discourage vexatious complaints, given that tenants’ conduct could result in an unreasonable increase in the costs of arbitration. However, I want to raise a couple of issues on that.

First, for tenants who are unfamiliar with how the code operates, it will be very useful to get some understanding of how it would apply to a tenant calling who lacks understanding about how this is done. Is the £200 fee an automatic charge, or is there some discretion available to the Pubs Code Adjudicator on how that might be levied for any inquiries? Certainly, given the lack of full understanding of how this code works, it would be extremely unwelcome if the fee stopped tenants coming forward with legitimate concerns.

Secondly, in relation to managing some of the issues around the code, obviously most tenants could not take reasonable legal advice or pay the costs of other sorts of advice. It is entirely plausible and possible that they may well add to the complication of the arbitration because they are not sufficiently skilled or sufficiently well resourced to add to the expertise that would be required to make sure that the costs can be minimised. We would hope that the Pubs Code Adjudicator would do some of those things. It would be useful, therefore, to have some sense of how these costs may act fairly rather than just as an impediment to tenants coming forward with complaints.

Finally, within six months of being established, the Pubs Code Adjudicator must issue guidance on the criteria that the adjudicator intends to adopt in deciding whether to carry out investigations and on the practices and procedures that the adjudicator intends to adopt when looking at investigations. I would be grateful if the Minister could come back to this House, either in her response or in writing, about what input the Government will or could have, or what input this House could have, in this process. If there are any issues of concern with the procedures that are developed, what checks are in place to discuss and revise them, if necessary, after the Pubs Code Adjudicator delivers them?

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I thank the noble Lord for his very constructive response and reiterate my thanks to all noble Lords who have engaged in this. I look forward to our further debate.

On fees, the adjudicator has a power to give advice, so that will not have a charge. Once a referral is made, a fee of £200 is due. I will look further at the detail of what the noble Lord has said, in case there is something I can add. I will also write on the point that he raised about the detail of the adjudicator, so that that is entirely clear as well.

I believe that the changes that we have made, as I think the noble Lord has said, to the SBEE Act legislation and to the draft Pubs Code regulations should mean that all concerned can support these measures as a balanced package to deliver greater fairness—a word that he used—in the relationship between tied pubs and the pub-owning businesses. I very much hope that the industry and the tenants can look forward to a prosperous future.

Motion on Amendments 1 to 11 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 12 to 17

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 12 to 17.

12: Before Clause 20, insert the following new Clause—

“The Institute for Apprenticeships

Schedule (The Institute for Apprenticeships) establishes the Institute for Apprenticeships and makes provision about its functions.”

13: Before Clause 20, insert the following new Clause—

“The Institute for Apprenticeships: transitional provision

(1) Subsection (2) applies to—

(a) any standard approved and published by the Secretary of State under section A2 of the 2009 Act before the appointed day;

(b) any plan which—

(i) relates to the assessment of a person’s attainment of outcomes set out in a standard mentioned in paragraph (a), and

(ii) was approved and published by the Secretary of State for the purposes of that assessment before the appointed day.

(2) Such a standard or plan is to be treated on and after the appointed day as having been approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships under section A2A of the 2009 Act and published by it under section A2 of that Act (as amended by Schedule (The Institute for Apprenticeships)).

(3) A standard or plan within subsection (1) is to be treated for the purposes of section A2I of the 2009 Act (as inserted by Schedule (The Institute for Apprenticeships)) as having been approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships at the beginning of the appointed day.

(4) This section does not limit the provision that may be made under clause 37.

(5) In this section—

“the appointed day” means the day on which section A2A of the Apprenticeship, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009 (inserted by Schedule (The Institute for Apprenticeships)) comes into force;

“the 2009 Act” means the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009.”

14: Clause 20, page 36, line 25, after “employment” insert “in England”

15: Clause 20, page 36, line 31, after “employees” insert “employed in England”

16: After Clause 21, insert the following new Clause—

“Apprenticeships: information sharing

(1) After Part 1 of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009 (apprenticeships, study and training) insert—

“Part 1A

APPRENTICESHIPS: INFORMATION SHARING

England

40A Sharing of information by HMRC and the Secretary of State

(1) HMRC may disclose information held by them to the Secretary of State for the purpose of the Secretary of State’s functions in relation to English statutory apprenticeships.

(2) The Secretary of State may disclose information to HMRC—

(a) for the purpose of requesting HMRC to disclose information under subsection (1), or

(b) for another purpose connected with the Secretary of State’s functions in relation to English statutory apprenticeships.

(3) In this section “English statutory apprenticeships” means—

(a) approved English apprenticeships within the meaning given in section A1;

(b) apprenticeships undertaken under apprenticeship agreements within the meaning given in section 32 that were entered into in connection with recognised English frameworks;

(c) apprenticeships in relation to which alternative English completion arrangements apply under section 1(5);

(d) apprenticeships undertaken under arrangements made in relation to England under section 2 of the Employment and Training Act 1973 that are identified by the person making them as arrangements for the provision of apprenticeships.

Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland

40B Sharing of information by HMRC and devolved authorities

(1) HMRC may disclose information held by them—

(a) to a Welsh authority for the purpose of the authority’s functions in relation to Welsh apprenticeships;

(b) to a Scottish authority for the purpose of the authority’s functions in relation to Scottish apprenticeships;

(c) to a Northern Irish authority for the purpose of the authority’s functions in relation to Northern Irish apprenticeships.

(2) An authority mentioned in paragraph (a), (b) or (c) of subsection (1) may disclose information to HMRC—

(a) for the purpose of requesting HMRC to disclose information to the authority under subsection (1), or

(b) for another purpose connected with the authority’s functions mentioned in subsection (1).

(3) In this section—

“Northern Irish apprenticeships” means apprenticeships undertaken under arrangements made under section 1 of the Employment and Training Act (Northern Ireland) 1950 that are identified by the person making them as arrangements for the provision of apprenticeships;

“Northern Irish authority” means—

(a) a Northern Ireland department, and

(b) any body or other person that is prescribed, or of a prescribed description;

“Scottish apprenticeships” means apprenticeships undertaken under arrangements made—

(a) in relation to Scotland, under section 2 of the Employment and Training Act 1973, or

(b) under section 2(3) of the Enterprise and New Towns (Scotland) Act 1990,

that are identified by the person making them as arrangements for the provision of apprenticeships;

“Scottish authority” means—

(a) the Scottish Ministers, and

(b) any body or other person that is prescribed, or of a prescribed description;

“Welsh apprenticeships” means—

(a) apprenticeships undertaken under apprenticeship agreements within the meaning given in section 32 that were entered into in connection with recognised Welsh frameworks;

(b) apprenticeships in relation to which alternative Welsh completion arrangements apply under section 2(5);

(c) apprenticeships undertaken under arrangements made in relation to Wales under—

(i) section 2 of the Employment and Training Act 1973, or

(ii) section 17B of the Jobseekers Act 1995,

that are identified by the person making them as arrangements for the provision of apprenticeships;

“Welsh authority” means—

(a) the Welsh Ministers, and

(b) any body or other person that is prescribed, or of a prescribed description.

(4) In subsection (3)—

(a) the reference to a Northern Ireland department includes a reference to a person providing services to a Northern Ireland department;

(b) the reference to the Scottish Ministers includes a reference to a person providing services to the Scottish Ministers;

(c) the reference to the Welsh Ministers includes a reference to a person providing services to the Welsh Ministers.

(5) Regulations under this section may amend the definition in subsection (3) of—

(a) “Northern Irish apprenticeships”,

(b) “Scottish apprenticeships”, or

(c) “Welsh apprenticeships”.

General

40C Wrongful disclosure

(1) Information disclosed by HMRC under section 40A(1) or 40B(1) may not be disclosed by the recipient of the information to any other person without the consent of HMRC (except so far as permitted by section 40A(2) or 40B(2)).

(2) If a person discloses, in contravention of subsection (1), any revenue and customs information relating to a person whose identity—

(a) is specified in the disclosure, or

(b) can be deduced from it,

section 19 of the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005 (wrongful disclosure) applies in relation to that disclosure as it applies in relation to a disclosure of such information in contravention of section 20(9) of that Act.

40D Interpretation

(1) In this Part—

“HMRC” means the Commissioners for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs;

“revenue and customs information relating to a person” has the same meaning as in section 19 of the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs Act 2005 (see section 19(2) of that Act).

(2) In this Part—

(a) references to HMRC include references to a person providing services to HMRC;

(b) references to the Secretary of State include references to a person providing services to the Secretary of State.

(3) Nothing in this Part affects any power to disclose information that exists apart from this Part.”

(2) In section 262(6) of that Act (orders and regulations subject to affirmative procedure) after paragraph (aa) insert—

“(aaa) regulations under section 40B;”.

(3) In section 268 of that Act (extent)—

(a) in subsection (2) (provisions extending to Scotland) for “Sections 40,” substitute “Section 40, Part 1A, sections”, and

(b) in subsection (3) (provisions extending to Northern Ireland) for “Sections”, in the first place, substitute “Part 1A, sections”.”

17: After Clause 21, insert the following new Clause—

“Apprenticeship funding

In section 100(1A) of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009 (provision of financial resources in connection with approved English apprenticeships)—

(a) for “approved English apprenticeships”, in both places, substitute “English statutory apprenticeships”, and

(b) after subsection (4) insert—

“(5) In this section “English statutory apprenticeship” has the same meaning as in section 40A (see subsection (3) of that section).””

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My Lords, the Government have brought forward these amendments to establish the new Institute for Apprenticeships. We have done a lot on apprenticeships, and the results are promising. On the apprentices side, 89% of apprentices said they are satisfied with their apprenticeship, and 82% of employers said they were satisfied with their programme. To build on this, and to deliver more world-class apprenticeships, we need to support employers in maintaining the quality of their apprenticeships.

A new and independent public body, the Institute for Apprenticeships, is being established to ensure the quality of apprenticeship standards across all sectors in England. Although the focus for its activities will be recommended by government annually, the institute will be free to determine its own processes and make autonomous decisions in relation to its functions, responding to employer and apprentice needs. Employer groups will continue to develop the content of standards and assessment plans. The institute will ensure that they are fit for purpose by scrutinising the standards and the plans. Sector and assessment experts, academics and others, will help the institute to carry out these functions. In addition, the institute will carry out some wider quality assurance functions, including making arrangements for evaluating the quality of the end-point assessment for apprenticeships. Our objective is to ensure, through the Institute for Apprenticeships, that quality remains at the heart of approved English apprenticeships, whether they are with the biggest international companies or in small craft businesses.

Amendments 14 and 15 clarify the information that public sector organisations subject to apprenticeships targets should provide to the Secretary of State to ensure consistency and clarity of reporting.

On Amendments 16 and 17, as noble Lords know, the current Finance Bill introduces the apprenticeship levy, which will fund a step change in apprenticeship numbers and quality and deliver on the commitment of 3 million apprenticeship starts by 2020. For employers to get the full benefit of the levy, we need to know what they have contributed. Data sharing between HMRC and the Secretary of State for BIS is the most effective way of doing this and the least burdensome for business. Amendment 16 will enable information held by HMRC on an employer’s levy due to be shared, so that the Government will be able to match apprenticeship funding in England to the levy payments made by each employer by creating individual employer digital accounts. Similar data-sharing powers are provided to devolved Administrations to manage their apprenticeship schemes. From April 2017, we intend to apply a 10% top-up to levy funds paid to employers’ digital accounts to spend on apprenticeship training in England. Levy-paying employers in England will therefore be able to get out more than they put in if they are committed to training apprentices—a very important principle. Amendment 17 is technical and uncontentious.

I commend these amendments to the House, and I beg to move.

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My Lords, the Minister said when she introduced the first set of amendments that the Bill was now in better shape than when it started. We can all agree with that, in particular with reference to apprenticeships. These amendments fill a lacuna in the area of apprenticeships, which we pointed out in Committee and on Report. Indeed, we tried very hard to get some movement from the Government on this but were rebuffed robustly, as is the noble Baroness’s way, albeit in a very gentle and appropriate manner. Therefore, it is all the more of a pleasure to see these amendments come back, which, in some senses, begin to address some of the big issues about what we need to do as a country to ensure that the apprenticeship route for vocational education is acknowledged, and made attractive to parents and the young people who might wish to take them, as has sadly been lacking for too many years.

However, there are some issues with the proposals, which I do not want in any sense to use to argue against them, but although we have some movement here there are still quite a lot of questions that have to be resolved. We will watch this with interest. I suspect—although I have no knowledge of this—that it might be something that your Lordships’ House may have to deal with as we go forward. For instance, the focus is rightly on trying to ensure that apprenticeships are of a high quality, but there is very little detail on what the new institute will do on that, and what it might not, at this stage, be appropriate to do. It has a good foundation with the people on it, but perhaps in its staffing it does not reach as far as it could towards issues that might give some reassurance that they are thinking about the quality levels. There is a problem about the age at which apprenticeships are offered. There are still too many people aged between 23 and 30 and not enough aged between 18 and 24. To what extent will the IFA have the tools to deal with that?

There is an assumption throughout a lot of people’s discussions and debate about apprenticeships that the focus will be on STEM subjects. In fact, I am sure the Minister will agree that there is just as much need to ensure that we have apprenticeships across the creative and other industries which supply so much of our national growth and which are being relied on to make sure that our economy is diversified—“STEAM”, not STEM, might be a better way of putting it. In case there is any doubt about that, the “A” stands for the arts and the creative industries.

These proposals do not deal with what is going to happen to our colleges. Many FE colleges are going through periodic and differential reviews and their future does not seem at all clear. They are obviously very nervous about how this will happen. Again, we would not seek to do this through the Bill, but we need more clarity about what the infrastructure that will receive the ministrations of the IFA will be able to do.

Finally, the question of the vocational education and the sort of provision that is required to provide an interlacing approach for children leaving school and going on to higher and further education is not yet fully mapped out, although I am sure that the aspirations are there. We will need to spend more time on that—perhaps when the White Paper turns into a higher education Bill we will have that opportunity. However, at the bottom of all that there is a really difficult problem about productivity. The test will be, at the end of the day, whether the IFA has anything to offer us in terms of improving productivity in this country, which is sadly lagging behind our competitors. If it does, all power to it; if it does not, we may have to revisit it; but in the interim it is an exciting development, we wish it well and we welcome these clauses.

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My Lords, I thank the noble Lord for his comments and for his help in filling the lacuna that he identified. I share his wish to see apprenticeships as a really attractive option for school leavers. We will be making more information available on funding and on the detail of how the new arrangements will work from next year. I hope that this will answer the noble Lord’s outstanding questions. He makes a good point about what we do for the younger apprentices and how that fits in with the older ones. I agree that while we need a focus on STEM we actually need apprenticeships right across the board and that the creative and digital industries are an incredibly important area. My friend in the other place, Ed Vaizey, slaves and steams day and night trying to ensure that that aspect is grabbed right across Whitehall.

What I like about the Bill is that it builds on earlier legislation to ensure that apprenticeships are real jobs with substantial and sustained training. The reforms are making apprenticeships more rigorous already and will ultimately help people to realise their potential. It will allow them to have a portfolio, so that they can move jobs if that is what they want to do. We are committed to ensuring that all apprenticeships are of high quality and this has been central to our reforms, as the House knows. High-quality apprenticeships are essential to support our employers and to help our economy prosper in the years to come. I believe that these additions to the Bill improve it and I trust that the House is happy to welcome these amendments.

Motion on Amendments 12 to 17 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 18 to 26

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 18 to 26.

18: Clause 26, page 43, line 31, after “English list” insert “or a Welsh list”

19: Clause 26, page 44, line 5, leave out “Consolidated Fund” and insert “appropriate fund”

20: Clause 26, page 44, line 14, after “English list” and insert “or a Welsh list”

21: Clause 26, page 44, line 24, leave out “Consolidated Fund” and insert “appropriate fund”

22: Clause 26, page 44, line 27, at end insert—

“( ) After subsection (7A) insert—

“(7B) For the purposes of subsections (4B)(b) and (5A)(d) “the appropriate fund” means—

(a) where the provision made by virtue of subsection (4A)(c) or (5) is in relation to a proposal to alter an English list, the Consolidated Fund, and

(b) where the provision made by virtue of subsection (4A)(c) or (5) is in relation to a proposal to alter a Welsh list, the Welsh Consolidated Fund.””

23: Clause 26, page 44, line 39, at end insert—

““Welsh list” means—

(a) a local non-domestic rating list that has to be compiled for a billing authority in Wales, or

(b) the central non-domestic rating list that has to be compiled for Wales.””

24: Clause 26, page 44, line 47, leave out from “unless” to end of line 48 and insert “—

(a) where those regulations relate to a proposal to alter an English list, a draft of the instrument has been laid before and approved by a resolution of each House of Parliament;

(b) where those regulations relate to a proposal to alter a Welsh list, a draft of the instrument has been laid before and approved by a resolution of the National Assembly for Wales.”

25: Clause 26, page 45, line 2, leave out from “is” to end of line 3 and insert “—

(a) in the case of regulations relating to England, subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament;

(b) in the case of regulations relating to Wales, subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the National Assembly for Wales.”

26: Clause 26, page 45, line 3, at end insert—

“(3G) In subsection (3E), “English list” and “Welsh list” have the same meaning as in section 55.”

Motion on Amendments 18 to 26 agreed.

Motion on Amendment 27

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendment 27.

27: After Clause 26, insert the following new Clause—

“Sunday working

Schedule (Sunday opening hours: rights of shop workers), which contains amendments of employment legislation relating to the rights of shop workers to opt out of working on Sunday, has effect.”

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My Lords, this group of amendments introduces measures to strengthen rights for shop workers in England and Wales and in Scotland by amending the Employment Rights Act 1996 and the Employment Act 2002.

We are no longer pursuing the devolution of powers to extend Sunday trading hours, which these measures were designed to complement.

These amendments essentially make four changes. First, they reduce the notice period for shop workers at large shops to opt out of Sunday working altogether, from three months to one month. Secondly, they create a new right for shop workers to opt out of working additional Sunday hours, again subject to one month’s notice at large shops and three months at smaller shops. Thirdly, they update the obligation on employers to notify shop workers of these rights. This includes a duty to notify existing as well as new shop workers. Lastly, they strengthen the consequences for employers who fail to comply with the notification requirements. Under these measures, as well as having stronger opt-out rights, shop workers will be clearer about what those rights are, how to exercise them and what to do if they suffer retribution. I beg to move.

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My Lords, when it was first introduced, this Bill was described as a Christmas tree Bill, as have a number of Bills from the Minister’s department. Therefore, it is a particular pleasure to receive a Christmas present at the end of the process in the form of a wholly unlooked for, but none the less very welcome, strengthening of the powers that now apply to people who have to work within the existing legislation on Sundays.

I am not sufficiently expert in Whitehall matters to know how long it would have been until an appropriate Bill came round and these very important issues would have been taken on their merits. Of course, as the noble Baroness said—she did not give us the gory detail—there was a bit of a circuit round Whitehall to find, first, a Bill that would take the devolution proposals and then a Minister willing to put the proposals into a Bill. Indeed, I seem to remember the noble Baroness saying at a meeting, perhaps informally, that the last thing she wanted to see in her Bill was a measure involving Sunday trading. She has had to concede a very important set of small paragraphs which will help people who currently work on Sunday, and we are delighted to have them.

This should go down as one of those case studies that appear in books describing how awful Whitehall can be sometimes, because at the meetings I went to we could never work out what the Government were trying to do. Was this about tourism or an attempt to defeat the incursion of internet shopping into our high streets? Was it to promote high streets? Was it to make sure that smaller shops in smaller towns were supported? It never really got sorted out. As one of the participants at the meetings, the right reverend Prelate pointed out that at the end of the day, unless you sorted this out in a holistic way, involving the staff from the beginning, it simply would not happen —and it did not. With that ringing in our ears, we welcome this proposal and look forward to its early implementation.

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My Lords, before we leave this group of amendments, I echo something that the noble Lord, Lord Stevenson, said a moment or two ago about the importance of protecting workers’ rights. I was involved in the original legislation when it was enacted and spoke in another place about protecting workers who wanted to opt out of having to work on Sundays, and I moved amendments that excluded Christmas Day and Easter Day—two of the very few amendments that were successful at that time.

To some extent, these amendments merely tinker with the protections provided previously. A lot of evidence has been gathered in the years since the enactment of the original legislation which indicates that those protections need strengthening further. I simply refer the Minister to what one of her predecessors —the noble Lord, Lord Sassoon—promised Parliament back in 2012, on 24 April, when he spoke at the Second Reading of the Sunday Trading (London Olympic and Paralympic Games) Bill. He said that Parliament would have the opportunity fully to debate the issue of Sunday trading restrictions if the issue were revisited. I simply ask the Minister why it therefore required the intervention of notable Members of Parliament such as Mr David Burrowes and the redoubtable Fiona Bruce, who worked across the divide to defeat the Government’s proposals, to prevent something being stampeded through without proper parliamentary scrutiny. Why was the promise given to the House in 2012 not honoured? Why did we not have a debate about this when it was in your Lordships’ House in the first instance, before it went to another place? Perhaps the Minister will shed light on that.

The Minister will know that there were some 7,000 responses to the consultation process the Government initiated. It would be a great breach of trust in the future—at a time when trust is not held in very high esteem by many people when looking at Parliament and politics—if we were both to ignore the responses to the consultation process and circumvent the promises Ministers have previously given. If any further changes are intended, will there be the opportunity for full parliamentary scrutiny? Can we please not use such methods, which, in the end, it took members of the Minister’s own party in the House of Commons to prevent the Government from proceeding with in a very high-handed way?

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I associate myself with a good deal of what the noble Lord, Lord Alton of Liverpool, has said. In particular, strengthening the rights of those in the retail trade in relation to Sunday trading is very important. I am glad that, however it has come about, it has ultimately been a government proposal which I hope noble Lords will agree to very quickly.

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I thank the noble Lord, Lord Stevenson, for his comments. I am also grateful for the welcome for these changes from the noble Lord, Lord Alton, and my noble and learned friend Lord Mackay of Clashfern. The provisions on Sunday trading were still being developed when the Bill was in the House. This is one of the reasons why I did not expect to be leading a discussion on Sunday trading. As noble Lords have said, the measures were originally intended as part of a much wider package, including measures on Sunday trading hours. The House of Commons spoke clearly; it had a debate; it has left the enhancement of shop workers’ rights in the Bill and this has been welcomed. We have not, therefore, had the chance for a full debate but it is good that we have had today’s debate.

In conclusion, some shop workers can still face pressure to work on Sundays, despite existing measures to protect them. This strengthening of shop workers’ rights makes it clear that this should not be the case. I beg to move.

Motion on Amendment 27 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 28 and 29

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Moved by

That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 28 and 29.

28: After Clause 31, insert the following new Clause—

“Market rent only option: rent assessments etc

In section 43 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 (pubs code: market rent only option), in subsection (6)(b), after “in lieu of rent” insert “(whether or not it results in a proposal that the rent, or amount of money payable, should increase)”.”

29: After Clause 31, insert the following new Clause—

“Reports on avoidance

In Part 4 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015 (the Pubs Code Adjudicator and the Pubs Code), after section 71 insert—

“71A Reports on avoidance

(1) The Adjudicator must report to the Secretary of State on cases of pub-owning businesses engaging in business practices which are, in the Adjudicator’s opinion, unfair business practices.

(2) A report under subsection (1) must include recommendations as to—

(a) actions to be taken to prevent pub-owning businesses from engaging in the business practices reported on, and

(b) how to provide redress for tied pub tenants affected by those practices.

(3) The Secretary of State must issue a statement within three months of receiving a report under subsection (1) setting out—

(a) action which the Secretary of State intends to take to protect tied pub tenants affected by the business practices reported on, or

(b) if the Secretary of State does not intend to take such action, the reasoning for that decision.

(4) In this section “unfair business practice” means a business practice which—

(a) is engaged in by a pub-owning business at any time after the passing of this Act in order to avoid, to the detriment of tied pub tenants, the operation of provision made by or under this Part, and

(b) is unfair.””

Motion on Amendments 28 and 29 agreed.

Motion on Amendment 30

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendment 30.

30: Clause 32, page 48, line 23, leave out Clause 32

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My Lords, Amendment 30 removes the provision, introduced on Report by the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, regarding the Green Investment Bank. I pause to pay tribute to the noble Lord. I am very grateful for his thoughtful and well-reasoned proposal, which requires a special share to be created to protect the green purpose of the bank when it leaves public ownership. We were all in the same place on this objective and he helped the Government find a way through.

As the noble Lord and I have discussed, there is a significant risk that mandating this structure in the legislation itself would prevent the bank moving to the private sector, so the Government needed to remove the provision from the Bill. However, there will instead be a special share held by a separate company, independent from Government, which will have the right to approve—or, equally importantly, reject—any proposed change to the bank’s green purpose as set out in its articles of association.

I can confirm that the Government have consulted with the Office for National Statistics, the body which determines whether an organisation is classified to the public or private sector, on the basis of internationally agreed rules. The ONS Economic Statistics Classifications Committee has formally opined that this special share should not prevent the bank moving to the private sector once it is sold. The noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, has suggested an amendment to bring out the ONS decision more clearly and I look forward to hearing his views on this. I am grateful to the noble Lord, Lord Smith of Kelvin, for his leadership of the bank and, as chairman of the bank, for updating noble Lords on progress in putting this special share in place. Those letters are in the House Libraries.

Noble Lords will be aware that the Government launched their sale of the Green Investment Bank last month. In launching the sale, we made very clear to the market and potential bidders that this special share model will be in place. We laid a report before Parliament on 3 March, which included details of our plans to create a special share as part of the sale process. I therefore commend Amendment 30 to the House, and I beg to move.

Amendment to the Motion on Amendment 30

Moved by

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At end insert “, and do propose Amendment 30B in lieu of the words so left out of the Bill”.

30B: Insert the following new Clause—

“Green Investment Bank: Office for National Statistics classification

Where, prior to a sale of shares of a UK Green Investment Bank Company (as defined in section 31(2)), the Office for National Statistics ("ONS") has a duty to make an assessment of the Green Investment Bank concerning its classification as public debt for the purposes of the National Accounts, the ONS must publish a report outlining its reasoning and the steps it has taken to reach its decision.”

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My Lords, before I speak to the amendment, I would like to congratulate noble Lords on the Liberal Democrat Benches for their work on this. The noble Lord, Lord Stoneham, made a very powerful speech in Committee. I pay extraordinary and particular tribute to the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, who has done a simply outstanding job in all the spadework that was done, and in speaking to a range of people; he has come up with a very elegant formula. I also congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Smith of Kelvin, and his colleagues at the Green Investment Bank, in moving to embrace this model. In fact, the special share provides for a much better Green Investment Bank and for the green purposes to be more extensive than they would have been with any form of government participation because of the state aid rules, so I think we are in a much better position.

The rationale behind this amendment relates, of course, to the problem we had in determining the structural issues. In June 2015, the Business Secretary announced the Government’s intention to privatise the bank to allow it to borrow more capital without adding to government debt, as reported in Business Green. However, the ONS ruled that, in order for the bank to obtain status as a private body, the Government must repeal any of their involvement in or control over the Green Investment Bank’s operation. As part of the privatisation process, the legislation in the Enterprise Bill, enshrining the Green Investment Bank’s green ethos, must be removed from the statute. This requirement has prompted fears that the bank could be hijacked by a private investor seeking to make investments not aligned to its core values.

The department’s November policy statement described the situation as follows:

“The decision on whether an organisation is classified to the public or private sector is made by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and is considered in accordance with the EU-wide regulations, set out principally in the European System of Accounts 2010, (ESA 2010) and supplemented by guidance in the accompanying ‘Manual on government deficit and debt’”.

In the light of the Government’s discussions with the ONS and HM Treasury, and the department’s assessment of the regulations, it was clear that even if the Green Investment Bank was no longer owned by the Government, current legislation on the bank was highly likely to be assessed by the owners as constituting government control over it, preventing it being reclassified to the private sector. It also said that the ONS would be in a position to take a substantive decision on the bank’s classification only once a transaction had actually taken place. Of course, that involves in part the question of contractual arrangements, but it is also about procedure.

This leads to a highly unsatisfactory process, which we faced when the Green Investment Bank provisions were first introduced into this Bill, which was something of a rush. It involved a lot of panicked conversations and an extensive repeal of existing legislation, without particular rhyme or reason being properly articulated. We have had an unseemly mess, which has only been adequately resolved by the efforts of the noble Lord, Lord Teverson. That could all have been avoided if there had been a reasonable discussion and a proper statement of reasons by the Office for National Statistics.

We have to consider that there are other opinions about whether this provision would breach those rules, and whether what was being said was likely to be actually true. Many experts in this field, given the opportunity, would have liked to make the case that classification was not necessary and the ONS was not just being overly cautious, but went way beyond the mark in making such an assessment. Indeed, there are examples in other countries of similar models which statistical bodies have applied without any real difficulty.

Finally, from the discussions that have taken place I am led to believe that the provision of a special share and the new structure of the Green Investment Bank enhance its value and the possibility of the overall sale of the bank. It is sensible for us to put in not some form of government or parliamentary oversight but a broader ability for ONS decisions to be made public earlier, for experts and practitioners in this field to have the chance to review them, and for the ONS to make a much more timely assessment and make those reasons well known. This is a simple amendment, which we hope the Government will look at carefully and consider a probable enhancement to the process as we look to change the status of certain assets in the Government’s control and move them towards the private sector. This would be a helpful addition, and I beg to move.

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My Lords, I thank the Minister very much for her kind words and the noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, for his great support and that of his colleagues all the way through this process. I also very much welcome the work and effort that the Minister put into persuading her ministerial colleagues to go down this route. I am sure that she was vital in that process. I hope that, because of this, as she said, all parts of the House are happy with the position we have reached and that the conditions which were put in the Bill will now be delivered in practice. As we have always said from these Benches, we were not really concerned with how it happened as long as it did happen. I am sure that we will have an institution which we in the United Kingdom, including the environmental movement and the financial community, can be proud of for many years to come, and that we will not face yet another generic financial institution with no real focus in the environmental area or anywhere else. We have avoided that happening in the longer term.

I want to speak briefly to Amendment 30B, in the name of the noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn. We have had a number of discussions about the privatisation of the Green Investment Bank. One area of discussion was the frustration—I came to be very sympathetic to the Government over this—in trying to determine whether amending legislation would mean that an institution on which we were legislating ended up in the public or private sector. I read through all the guidelines published by Europe and the ONS on classification but it seems that, despite them, a lot of these issues are not straightforward. They are quite subjective in many ways. The nub of this—the noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, put this over very well—is that it gets in the way of the parliamentary process. If, because of a particular amendment or the way in which legislation is written, the Government cannot be certain at the end of that process whether a body is in the public or private sector, it means that they are forced to be conservative with a small “c” in estimating how an amendment should be phrased. That is not healthy for parliamentary debate or the way in which legislation is formed.

Although this is a limited amendment, I very much agree with its spirit. But I say to the House that this area needs to be investigated further. The amendment would not challenge in any way the independence of the ONS, which is clearly sacred; but its transparency and the way its decisions are made, pre-event as well as ex post, are extremely important. I wish the Green Investment Bank every continued success in its mission to stimulate the green economy. It has been successful in the past and I hope that, through its privatisation, it will be even more successful in the future.

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My Lords, the chairman of the Green Investment Bank, the noble Lord, Lord Smith of Kelvin, is not in his place this afternoon, but I am sure he would like it to be said on his behalf that he is grateful to the Government for agreeing to remove these three clauses from the Bill and to the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, for all the work that he has done to bring this solution about. I think it is right to say that as far as the chairman is concerned, his main aim in detaching the bank from the public sector is to attract investment. From his point of view, investment is vital if the bank is to fulfil its ambitious plans to double the size of its business and to deliver a growing green project—I am quoting from one of the letters which, as the Minister said, have been placed in the Library. So minimising the risk of the bank being classified as part of the public sector is part of the strategy of the noble Lord, Lord Smith, to attract investment, and from his point of view, the result of the amendments the Minister has moved will be to help him to deliver what he is seeking to deliver.

I think I should mention also that steps have been taken by the bank to make progress with the overall scheme that has been devised. A new special shareholder company has been incorporated and agreement from three very well-established and reputable institutions has been secured so that they will help the bank to find individuals to serve in a personal capacity as trustees of the special share that has been set up. The structures are now being put in place and the step being taken this afternoon is really the last in the series of steps to bring about the reality that the noble Lord, Lord Smith, has been seeking to achieve for some months. So, on his behalf, I repeat the thanks to various people, including the Minister, for what has been achieved.

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My Lords, I thank all noble Lords, especially the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, for his gracious comments. This has been a brief but constructive discussion. Let me reiterate that the Government not only support the intention of this provision but are already acting on it. I am also very grateful for the intervention of the noble and learned Lord, Lord Hope, speaking on behalf of the noble Lord, Lord Smith, who could not be here today. He rightly underlined the importance of the external investment that the Green Investment Bank is seeking to raise to realise its exciting green ambitions.

Working across this House, we developed a mechanism that meets our purpose. It allows the bank to move to the private sector, meaning that it can grow and increase its green impact, and it ensures that its green mission is protected. With regard to the amendment tabled by the noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, the ONS publishes its decisions routinely. Indeed, for some classification decisions, such as that of Royal Mail or Lloyds TSB, the ONS also provides detailed reasoning behind the classification decision. I can reassure the noble Lord that the ONS has confirmed that it will publish a detailed explanatory article on its decision on the classification of the GIB.

However, I must emphasise—this is the nub of the problem—that a decision on the GIB will be taken only after the sale has taken place. There is a reason for this. Until the ONS is able to look at the full facts of the matter, such as the legislation which exists at that point in time, the precise nature and number of the shareholders, their rights and so on, it cannot make a formal decision on which party is in control of the body, and hence on its classification. That is why the Government engage with ONS during the development of policy proposals, where ONS will give a formal, but provisional, classification assessment. That is what we did with the special share structure which the GIB is now putting in place. As I mentioned earlier, the ONS has given us a formal opinion that this structure should not prevent the GIB moving to the private sector.

The noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, rightly asked why the decision could not be published earlier. As I have said, the decision will come after the sale has completed. Until the full details, which would include legislation, ownership and contractual arrangements, are known, any judgment on who controls the body could only ever be provisional—so providing an earlier decision would not enhance certainty. Unfortunately, the nature of these assessments can be complex and cases can be time-consuming, although I am glad to say that the ONS publishes its forward work plan every quarter, which sets out the classification issues that it will be considering.

So what is the way forward? I understand noble Lords’ frustration; I have to say that I shared it myself in spades on the question of public sector classification and the ONS’s role. These concerns go wider than just the issue of the Green Investment Bank, and I am happy to undertake to bring them to the attention of my colleagues in the Treasury to see if anything can be done for future cases to help rightly risk-averse government Ministers.

I hope that we can all agree that we have reached a good outcome for the Green Investment Bank and wish it well, and I hope that in the circumstances the noble Lord will feel able to withdraw his amendment.

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My Lords, I thank the noble and learned Lord, Lord Hope of Craighead, and the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, for their comments about the good work of the noble Lord, Lord Smith of Kelvin, and the good wishes that we have for the bank’s successful operation in the future.

I thank the Minister for her comments. I would just say that if you go to someone for a provisional view and they give it, you must have given them some assumptions for the basis of which they can take such a view, and you must have given them a potential range of assumptions. It is certainly true that a decision cannot be confirmed until the full facts are there, but some assumptions were given at the first stages in order to take that provisional view. All we are asking is to make sure that that view is made properly available because, as the noble Lord, Lord Teverson, said, so many of the measures are subjective. But I appreciate her comment that she will go back and look at what can be done. In light of that positive response, I beg leave to withdraw the amendment.

Amendment to the Motion on Amendment 30 withdrawn.

Motion on Amendment 30 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 31 and 32

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 31 and 32.

31: Clause 33, page 49, line 16, leave out Clause 33

32: Clause 34, page 49, line 38, leave out Clause 34

Motion on Amendments 31 and 32 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 33 to 39

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 33 to 39.

33: Clause 35, page 52, line 5, at end insert—

“( ) by the Welsh Ministers, in relation to relevant Welsh exit payments;”

34: Clause 35, page 52, line 25, at end insert—

“( ) if made by the Welsh Ministers, may not be made unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing them has been laid before, and approved by a resolution of, the National Assembly for Wales.”

35: Clause 35, page 52, line 30, at end insert—

“( ) In this section “relevant Welsh exit payments” means exit payments made to holders of the following offices—

(a) member of the National Assembly for Wales;

(b) the First Minister for Wales;

(c) Welsh Minister appointed under section 48 of the Government of Wales Act 2006;

(d) Counsel General to the Welsh Government;

(e) Deputy Welsh Minister;

(f) member of a county council or a county borough council in Wales;

(g) member of a National Park Authority in Wales;

(h) member of a Fire and Rescue Authority in Wales.”

36: Clause 35, page 52, line 35, at end insert—

“(2A) The Welsh Ministers may relax any restriction imposed by regulations made by the Welsh Ministers under section 153A.”

37: Clause 35, page 52, line 45, at beginning insert “except in relation to exit payments made by a relevant Welsh authority,”

38: Clause 35, page 53 leave out lines 16 to 22 and insert—

“(6) Regulations under section 153A made by the Welsh Ministers may—

(a) make provision for the power under subsection (2A) to be exercisable on behalf of the Welsh Ministers by a person specified in the regulations;

(b) where provision is made by virtue of paragraph (a), make provision for a requirement to be relaxed only—

(i) with the consent of the Welsh Ministers, or

(ii) following compliance with any directions given by the Welsh Ministers;

(c) make provision as to the publication of information about any relaxation of a requirement granted.

(6A) Regulations made by the Treasury under section 153A(1)—

(a) must, if they make provision in relation to exit payments made by a relevant Welsh authority, provide for the power conferred on a Minister of the Crown by subsection (1) to be exercised instead by the Welsh Ministers in relation to those exit payments;

(b) may provide for the power conferred on a Minister of the Crown by subsection (1) to be exercised instead by the Welsh Ministers in relation to exit payments made by any other authority who is not a relevant Welsh authority but who wholly or mainly exercises functions in relation to Wales (but this does not limit the provision that may be made under subsection (4)(a)).”

39: Clause 35, page 53, line 24, at end insert—

““relevant Welsh authority” means an authority who wholly or mainly exercises functions which could be conferred by provision falling within the legislative competence of the National Assembly for Wales (as defined in section 108 of the Government of Wales Act 2006).”

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My Lords, I think that we are now on the homeward path. These amendments relate to public sector exit pay. A number of noble Lords have spoken on this subject. However, the amendments made in the other place that we are discussing today relate only to further regulation-making powers for Welsh Ministers in devolved areas. Specifically, the amendments enable Welsh Ministers to make regulations in respect of exit payments where they have devolved legislative competence for exit payments under the Government of Wales Act 2006. The amendments have been improved by the Welsh Assembly and I hope that noble Lords will also approve them. I beg to move.

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My Lords, I welcome what the Minister has just said in respect of Wales. I point out to her that that is exactly the argument that I and my noble friend Lady Morgan put forward on the Trade Union Bill when we said that these were devolved matters covering devolved public services and that it was a breach of the devolution settlement that the Trade Union Bill transgressed that. So I am very glad that she has conceded that principle in this Bill.

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My Lords, the Conservative manifesto introduced this issue, saying that a Conservative Government would legislate to cap redundancy compensation for public sector workers with a particular focus on larger amounts. I will make just a few comments about something that has received some consideration but falls slightly outside that, and it would be useful if the Minister could give some indication of whether the Government were thinking in some way about how to accommodate this. It relates to the nuclear decommissioning workers who entered into an agreement with their employer. To seek to undo that agreement through legislation is slightly unjust, and this is worth looking at.

The new legislation supersedes protections under previous legislation, including the statutory protections introduced under Schedule 8 to the Energy Act 2004, which currently safeguards workers’ pensions, such as those of the Magnox workers. It has been estimated that about 1,200 Magnox workers who are decommissioning the UK’s nuclear plants will be caught out by the proposed measures in the Bill, which could see them losing thousands of pounds in retirement income. The particular reason why these cases are worthy of note is of course that people took on those jobs knowing that it would change their retirement years because they were involved in a job which had an end date which was not the same as their full working life—these were expert workers who made the decision to do it because in compensation the balance of pension payments would in some way adequately reward their commitment to that work. The impact of the Bill could also be felt by many other workers, including the entire 30,000 who are working across the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority’s estate, who will also be affected by a cap of £95,000.

As I understand from the presentation in the manifesto and at other times, the exit cap was to be seen as putting a stop to the so-called golden handshakes or fat-cat pension payouts in the public sector. But it will impact on many long-serving low-paid workers within the nuclear industry. That is why we hope that there will be some opportunity outside the Bill for the Government to look very carefully at the arrangements they have for those who do this difficult, dangerous and very important work and to give some due consideration to that, particularly because their provisions also relate to an agreement that was present in the Energy Act 2004.

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My Lords, I am grateful for the response and for the support for these amendments. Similar to the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government can now determine how they want to take forward arrangements in relation to devolved bodies and workforces. The devolved Administrations will be responsible for putting forward their own regulations and listing relevant bodies in scope. As I made clear in introducing the amendments, they will enable Welsh Ministers to make regulations in respect of exit payments where they have devolved legislative competence for exit payments under the Government of Wales Act 2006. Therefore, the situation is different from those issues, which we will no doubt come on to debate later this afternoon.

The noble Lord, Lord Mendelsohn, asked about the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority—a point that we have touched on before. Interestingly, as we discussed in relation to the previous amendment, the ONS is involved. It determines whether a body falls within the public sector by reference to objective criteria, based on whether the governance, funding, ownership and function of these bodies demonstrate that they are controlled by government. Organisations within the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority carry out important public work, acting as agents of and under the direction of the NDA and operating only through a licence issued by the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

The majority of funding provided to the NDA comes from the Exchequer and amounts to about £2 billion a year. Regulations, not the Bill itself, will set out who is within the scope of the cap, and I can reassure the noble Lord that the Treasury will release both the guidance and regulations in the summer in order to consult with stakeholders. We expect the regulations to come before this House later this year and to be in force from October 2016 at the earliest. NDA employees due to exit before this date will not be affected. From the point when the regulations have been made, Ministers will be able to relax the cap and may wish to consider whether exceptionally it should be relaxed for certain individuals or even organisations.

To conclude, as I said earlier, the Bill supports the UK’s position as the best place in Europe to start and grow a business. The amendments made in the other place make a series of changes to further support our aim, adding measures on apprenticeships, Sunday working, Wales, tidying up the pubs and on the Green Investment Bank, and making a number of technical changes. I thank all noble Lords who have spoken in the debates in this House and of course in the other place.

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I apologise to the Minister and my own Front Bench, but I cannot accept the distinction she is making between Bills here. The Minister is saying that the principle that devolved public services should be run by the Welsh Government is accepted by Her Majesty’s Government in this House in respect of this Bill but not in respect of the Trade Union Bill. That gives rise to a major question which the Welsh Government will want to revisit.

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I thank the noble Lord. My understanding is that the situation is different but we will no doubt have a debate later today—as I have already indicated. I do not think that we can spend further time in relation to this provision, which is clear cut and fully supported. I finish by thanking all those who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to facilitate the Bill’s passage through this House, including the House’s authorities, the Lord Speaker and the Bill team, who have worked so hard to get us to this place.

Motion on Amendments 33 to 39 agreed.

Motion on Amendments 40 to 54

Moved by

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That this House do agree with the Commons in their Amendments 40 to 54.

40: Clause 38, page 54, line 29, at end insert—

“( ) section (Sunday working), and Schedule (Sunday working hours: rights of shop workers) (Sunday working hours: rights of shop workers), for the purpose of enabling the exercise of any power to make regulations under any provision of the Employment Rights Act 1996 inserted by that Schedule;”

41: Clause 38, page 54, line 30, at end insert—

“( ) paragraph 2 of Schedule 2 (things to be included in Secretary of State’s report in respect of the business impact target), and section 14 (which introduces Schedule 2) so far as relating to that paragraph;”

42: Clause 38, page 54, line 44, at end insert “(so far as not already in force under subsection (1)).”

43: Clause 38, page 55, line 4, leave out subsection (4) and insert—

“(4) The following provisions of this Act come into force on such day as the Treasury may by regulations appoint—

(a) section 29 (UK Government Investments Limited);

(b) section 35 and Schedule 4 (restriction on public sector exit payments).”

44: Clause 38, page 55, line 6, leave out “The remaining” and insert “Subject to subsections (1) to (4), the”

45: Clause 39, page 55, line 15, leave out “and 15” and insert “, 15 and 18 to 21”

46: Clause 39, page 55, line 16, at end insert—

“( ) subsections (5) to (9) of section 14 (application of changes relating to the business impact target in relation to the relevant period in which they come into force);

( ) section (Apprenticeships: information sharing) (apprenticeships: information sharing);”

47: Clause 39, page 55, line 17, leave out “Part 5” and insert “sections 22 and 23”

48: Clause 39, page 55, line 25, leave out subsection (2)

49: Clause 39, page 55, line 28, at end insert—

“( ) Section (The Institute for Apprenticeships: transitional provision) extends to England and Wales.”

50: Clause 39, page 55, line 29, at beginning insert “Subject to subsection (1),”

51: Clause 40, page 55, line 33, leave out subsection (2)

52: After Schedule 3, insert the following new Schedule—

“THE INSTITUTE FOR APPRENTICESHIPS

1 The Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009 is amended as follows.

2 In Part 1 (apprenticeships, study and training) before Chapter A1 insert—

“Chapter ZA1

THE INSTITUTE FOR APPRENTICESHIPS

Establishment

ZA1 The Institute for Apprenticeships

(1) A body corporate known as the Institute for Apprenticeships is established.

(2) In this Act that body is referred to as “the IfA”.

(3) Schedule A1 makes further provision about the IfA.

General duties and functions

ZA2 General duties

(1) So far as relevant, and subject to any notice given by the Secretary of State under subsection (2), in performing its functions the IfA must have regard to—

(a) the reasonable requirements of industry, commerce, finance, the professions and other employers regarding education and training within the IfA’s remit;

(b) the reasonable requirements of persons who may wish to undertake education and training within the IfA’s remit;

(c) the need to ensure that education and training within the IfA’s remit is of an appropriate quality;

(d) the need to ensure that education and training within the IfA’s remit represents good value in relation to financial resources provided out of public funds;

(e) any information provided to it by any person designated by the Secretary of State for the purposes of this paragraph.

(2) The Secretary of State may give a notice in writing to the IfA setting out other matters to which the IfA must have regard when performing its functions.

(3) The Secretary of State may not give a notice under subsection (2) more than once in any financial year (within the meaning given by section ZA6(6)), except as provided by subsection (4).

(4) Where in a financial year—

(a) a notice is given under subsection (2), and

(b) after the giving of the notice a new Parliament meets for the first time,

the Secretary of State may give one further notice under subsection (2) in that year.

(5) The IfA must perform its functions efficiently and effectively.

(6) For the purposes of this section, education or training is within the IfA’s remit if the education or training is or may be provided in the course of an approved English apprenticeship.

(7) Subsection (1) and any notice under subsection (2) do not apply in relation to functions that are—

(a) delegated by directions under section ZA4, or

(b) conferred by regulations under section ZA5,

unless the directions or regulations provide for them to apply in relation to the functions.

(8) Where directions or regulations so provide, the directions or regulations—

(a) may provide for any education or training to which the functions relate to be treated as within the IfA’s remit for the purposes of this section;

(b) may provide for subsection (1) and any notice under subsection (2) to apply in relation to the functions with such modifications as the Secretary of State thinks fit.

(9) The Secretary of State must—

(a) publish in such manner as the Secretary of State thinks fit any notice under subsection (2), and

(b) lay a copy of it before Parliament.

ZA3 Provision of advice and assistance to the Secretary of State etc

(1) The IfA may, if requested to do so by the Secretary of State, provide the Secretary of State with advice and assistance in connection with the Secretary of State’s functions relating to apprenticeships in relation to England.

(2) The Secretary of State’s functions mentioned in subsection (1) include those under section 100(1A) or otherwise relating to the funding of apprenticeships in relation to England.

ZA4 Delegation of functions to the IfA by Secretary of State

(1) The Secretary of State may by direction delegate to the IfA any of the Secretary of State’s functions relating to apprenticeships in relation to England.

(2) The functions may be delegated—

(a) to any extent that the Secretary of State specifies in the direction, and

(b) subject to any conditions that the Secretary of State specifies in the direction.

(3) The Secretary of State’s functions mentioned in subsection (1) include those under section 100(1A) or otherwise relating to the funding of apprenticeships in relation to England.

ZA5 Conferral of further functions on the IfA by regulations

(1) The Secretary of State may by regulations confer on the IfA such functions relating to apprenticeships in relation to England as the Secretary of State considers appropriate.

(2) A function conferred by regulations under subsection (1) may involve the exercise of a discretion.

ZA6 Annual and other reports

(1) As soon as reasonably practicable after the end of each financial year, the IfA must prepare an annual report.

(2) An annual report is a report which includes—

(a) a description of what the IfA has done during the year, including a description of what the IfA has done as a result of any notice given by the Secretary of State under section ZA2(2),

(b) the statement of accounts prepared for that year under paragraph 11 of Schedule A1, and

(c) such other provision as the Secretary of State may direct.

(3) The IfA must send the report to the Secretary of State as soon as reasonably practicable after it has been prepared.

(4) The Secretary of State must lay a copy of the report before Parliament.

(5) The Secretary of State may direct the IfA to prepare, and send to the Secretary of State, as soon as reasonably practicable a report on any matter relating to its functions.

(6) In this section “financial year” means—

(a) the period beginning with the day on which this section comes into force and ending with the following 31 March, and

(b) each successive period of 12 months.

Compliance

ZA7 Secretary of State directions where the IfA fails to discharge duties etc

If the Secretary of State is satisfied that the IfA—

(a) has failed to discharge a duty imposed on it by or under this Act, or

(b) has acted or is proposing to act in an unreasonable way in exercising any function,

the Secretary of State may give the IfA such directions as the Secretary of State considers appropriate.

Directions

ZA8 General provision about directions under Chapters ZA1 and A1

(1) This section applies to a direction given to the IfA by the Secretary of State under this Chapter or Chapter A1.

(2) The IfA must comply with the direction.

(3) The direction must be in writing.”

3 Before section A1 insert—

“Introductory”

4 In section A1 (meaning of “approved English apprenticeship”), in subsection (3)(a) for “the Secretary of State has published an approved apprenticeship standard under section A2” substitute “an approved apprenticeship standard has been published under section A2”.

5 For section A2 (approved apprenticeship standards) substitute—

“Publication of standards and assessment plans

A2 Apprenticeship standards and assessment plans

(1) The IfA must publish—

(a) standards for such sectors of work as the IfA considers appropriate for the purposes of this Chapter, and

(b) assessment plans in respect of published standards.

(2) Each standard must—

(a) describe the sector of work to which it relates, and

(b) if there is more than one standard for the sector, describe the kind of work within the sector to which it relates.

(3) Each standard must set out the outcomes that persons seeking to complete an approved English apprenticeship are expected to attain in order to achieve the standard.

(4) An assessment plan in respect of a standard is a plan in accordance with which a person’s attainment of the outcomes set out in the standard is to be assessed.

(5) Each assessment plan must—

(a) specify the standard to which it relates, and

(b) set out the proposed arrangements for evaluating the quality of any assessment provided for by the plan.

(6) The following provisions supplement the provision made by this section—

section A2A makes provision about the preparation of apprenticeship standards and assessment plans;

sections A2B to A2D make provision related to ensuring the quality of apprenticeship assessments;

sections A2E and A2F make provision about the review, revision and withdrawal of apprenticeship standards and assessment plans;

section A2G makes provision for independent examinations of apprenticeship standards and assessment plans;

section A2H makes provision about the maintenance of a published list of apprenticeship standards and assessment plans;

section A2I provides for the automatic transfer to the IfA of copyright in apprenticeship standards and assessment plans.

A2A Preparation of apprenticeship standards and assessment plans

(1) Each standard or assessment plan published under section A2 must have been prepared by a group of persons and approved by the IfA.

(2) The group of persons that prepared a standard or assessment plan published under section A2 must have been approved by the IfA for the purposes of this section.

(3) The IfA may provide advice or assistance to a group of persons in connection with the preparation of a standard or assessment plan.

(4) The IfA must publish—

(a) information about matters that it takes into account when deciding whether or not to approve standards or plans for the purposes of subsection (1);

(b) information about matters that it takes into account when deciding whether or not to approve groups of persons for the purposes of subsection (2).

(5) When making a decision of the kind mentioned in subsection (4)(a) or (b) in a particular case, the IfA may also take into account such other matters as it considers appropriate in the case in question.

(6) Information published under subsection (4) may be revised or replaced, and the IfA must publish under that subsection any revised or replacement information.

Quality assurance

A2B Evaluation of quality of apprenticeship assessments

(1) The IfA must secure that evaluations are carried out of the quality of apprenticeship assessments provided by persons in relation to assessment plans published under section A2.

(2) “Apprenticeship assessment” means the assessment of a person’s attainment of the outcomes set out in the standard to which the assessment plan relates.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1) the IfA may approve or make arrangements for other persons to carry out evaluations.

A2C Unsatisfactory apprenticeship assessments

(1) If the IfA considers that the quality of any apprenticeship assessment provided by a person is or may become unsatisfactory, it may carry out a review of the assessment, or make arrangements with another person for the carrying out of such a review.

(2) The IfA may, in consequence of a review, make arrangements for the purpose of improving the quality of the assessment to which the review relates.

(3) If the IfA—

(a) considers that the quality of any apprenticeship assessment provided by a person is or may become unsatisfactory, or

(b) that a person who provides an apprenticeship assessment has failed to co-operate with a review carried out under this section or with arrangements made under subsection (2),

it may report the matter to the Secretary of State or such other person as the IfA considers appropriate.

(4) A report under subsection (3) may contain recommendations as to the action to be taken by the person to whom the report is made.

(5) The IfA may publish a report under subsection (3).

A2D Committee to advise on quality evaluations etc

(1) The IfA may establish a committee with—

(a) the function of giving the IfA advice on the performance of its functions under sections A2B and A2C, and

(b) such other functions as may be conferred on the committee by the IfA.

(2) A majority of the members of the committee—

(a) must be persons who appear to the IfA to have experience of the assessment of education or training, and

(b) must not be members of the IfA.

(3) Subject to that, Schedule A1 applies to a committee established under this section as it applies to committees established under paragraph 7 of that Schedule.

Review, revision and withdrawal

A2E Regular reviews of published standards and assessment plans

(1) The IfA must maintain arrangements for the review at regular intervals of each standard or assessment plan published under this Chapter, with a view to determining whether the standard or plan ought to be revised or withdrawn.

(2) In respect of each standard or assessment plan published under this Chapter, the IfA must publish information about the intervals at which those reviews are to be conducted.

A2F Revision or withdrawal of published standards and assessment plans

(1) The IfA may—

(a) publish a revised version of a standard or assessment plan published under this Chapter, or

(b) withdraw a standard or assessment plan published under this Chapter (with or without publishing another in its place).

(2) Section A2A applies in relation to a revised version of a standard or plan published under this section as it applies in relation to a standard or plan published under section A2.

Other provisions about English approved apprenticeships

A2G Examinations by independent third parties

(1) Before the IfA approves a standard or assessment plan for the purposes of section A2A(1) it must make arrangements for the carrying out of an examination of the standard or plan by an independent third party.

(2) The duty imposed by subsection (1) does not apply in relation to a revised version of a standard or assessment plan, but the IfA may, for the purposes of a review under section A2E or at any other time, make arrangements for the carrying out of an examination of a standard or assessment plan by an independent third party.

(3) Where an examination of a standard or assessment plan is carried out under this section, the IfA must take account of the finding of the examination in exercising its functions in relation to the standard or plan under this Chapter.

(4) Nothing in subsection (1) prevents the IfA deciding to reject a standard or assessment plan without first making arrangements for the carrying out of an examination by an independent third party.

A2H List of published standards and assessment plans

(1) The IfA must maintain a list of the standards and assessment plans published by it under this Chapter.

(2) In respect of each standard and plan listed (including any revised version), the list must include details of when it comes into force.

(3) Where a revised version is listed, the list must include a general description of the cases to which the revised version applies.

(4) Where a standard or plan has been withdrawn, the list must include details of when the withdrawal comes into force and a general description of the cases to which it applies.

(5) The IfA must secure that the list is available free of charge at all reasonable times.

A2I Transfer of copyright in standards and assessment plans

(1) This section applies where—

(a) a standard or assessment plan is approved by the IfA under section A2A, and

(b) a person (other than the IfA) is entitled, immediately before the time the approval is given, to any right or interest in any copyright in the standard or plan.

(2) The right or interest is, by virtue of this section, transferred from that person to the IfA at the time the approval is given.

(3) The IfA must ensure that a standard or assessment plan in relation to which a right or interest has transferred by virtue of subsection (2) is made available to the public, subject to any conditions that the IfA considers appropriate.”

6 (1) Section A3 (power to issue apprenticeship certificate) is amended as follows.

(2) In subsection (1) for “to” substitute “in respect of”.

(3) In subsection (2), for paragraph (b) substitute—

“(b) the supply by the Secretary of State of apprenticeship certificates issued under that subsection, and copies of those certificates, to—

(i) persons in respect of whom they were issued;

(ii) persons for whom those persons work or have worked under approved English apprenticeship agreements to which the certificates relate.”

7 In section 122 (sharing of information for education and training purposes)—

(a) in subsection (3) (persons who may provide and receive information), after paragraph (f) insert—

“(g) the IfA.”;

(b) in subsection (5) (functions for the purposes of which information may be provided)—

(i) omit the “or” at the end of paragraph (b), and

(ii) after paragraph (b) insert—

“(ba) any function of the IfA, or”.

8 In section 262(6) (orders and regulations subject to affirmative procedure) before paragraph (ab) insert—

“(aab) regulations under section ZA5;”

9 Before Schedule 1 insert—

“SCHEDULE A1

THE INSTITUTE FOR APPRENTICESHIPS

Status

1 The IfA is to perform its functions on behalf of the Crown.

Membership

2 (1) The IfA is to consist of—

(a) a member appointed by the Secretary of State to chair the IfA (“the chair”);

(b) the chief executive appointed in accordance with paragraph 5;

(c) at least 4 and no more than 10 other members appointed by the Secretary of State.

(2) The chair and members appointed under sub-paragraph (1)(c) are referred to in this Schedule as the “non-executive members”.

Tenure of non-executive members

3 (1) The non-executive members hold and vacate office in accordance with the terms of their appointment.

(2) Those terms are to be determined by the Secretary of State, subject to the following provisions of this Schedule.

(3) A non-executive member must not be appointed for a term of more than five years.

(4) A non-executive member may resign from office at any time by giving written notice to the Secretary of State.

(5) The Secretary of State may remove a non-executive member from office on either of the following grounds—

(a) inability or unfitness to carry out the duties of office;

(b) absence from the IfA’s meetings for a continuous period of more than 6 months without the IfA’s permission.

(6) The previous appointment of a person as a non-executive member does not affect the person’s eligibility for re-appointment.

Remuneration of non-executive members

4 (1) The IfA must, if the Secretary of State requires it to do so, pay remuneration, allowances and expenses to its non-executive members.

(2) The IfA must, if the Secretary of State requires it to do so, pay, or make provision for the payment of, a pension, allowances or gratuities to or in respect of a person who is or has been a non-executive member.

(3) If a person ceases to be a non-executive member of the IfA and the Secretary of State decides that the person should be compensated because of special circumstances, the IfA must pay compensation to the person.

(4) The amount of a payment under sub-paragraph (1), (2) or (3) is to be determined by the Secretary of State.

(5) Service as a non-executive member is one of the kinds of service to which a scheme under section 1 of the Superannuation Act 1972 (superannuation schemes as respects civil servants etc) can apply (see Schedule 1 to that Act).

(6) The IfA must pay to the Minister for the Civil Service, at such times as the Minister may direct, such sums as the Minister may determine in respect of any increase attributable to the provision of pensions, allowances or gratuities under section 1 of the Superannuation Act 1972 payable to or in respect of non-executive members in the sums payable out of money provided by Parliament under the Superannuation Act 1972.

Chief executive and other staff

5 (1) The first chief executive is to be appointed by the Secretary of State on conditions of service determined by the Secretary of State, after consulting the chair.

(2) Subsequent chief executives are to be appointed by the IfA after consulting the Secretary of State.

(3) The chief executive must not be appointed for a term of more than five years.

(4) The previous appointment of a person as chief executive does not affect the person’s eligibility for re-appointment.

(5) The chief executive holds that office as a member of staff of the IfA.

(6) The IfA may appoint other members of staff.

(7) Service as a member of staff of the IfA is employment in the civil service of the State.

(8) The following are to be determined by the IfA with the approval of the Secretary of State—

(a) the number of members of staff of the IfA (in addition to the chief executive);

(b) the conditions of service of staff of the IfA.

(9) Sub-paragraph (8)(b) is subject to sub-paragraph (1).

Arrangements with Secretary of State

6 The Secretary of State and the IfA may enter into arrangements with each other for the provision to the IfA by the Secretary of State, on such terms as may be agreed, of staff, accommodation or services.

Committees

7 (1) The IfA may establish committees, and any committee established by the IfA may establish sub-committees.

(2) The IfA may—

(a) dissolve a sub-committee established under sub-paragraph (1), or

(b) alter the purposes for which such a sub-committee is established.

(3) In this Schedule a committee or sub-committee established under sub-paragraph (1) is referred to as an “IfA committee”.

(4) An IfA committee must include at least two persons who are members of the IfA or its staff.

(5) The IfA may, with the approval of the Secretary of State, arrange for the payment of remuneration, allowances and expenses to any person who—

(a) is a member of an IfA committee, but

(b) is not a member of the IfA or its staff.

(6) The IfA must, if directed to do so by the Secretary of State, review—

(a) the structure of IfA committees, and

(b) the scope of the activities of each IfA committee.

Procedure

8 (1) The IfA may regulate—

(a) its own proceedings (including quorum), and

(b) the procedure (including quorum) of IfA committees.

(2) The validity of proceedings of the IfA, or of an IfA committee, is not affected by—

(a) a vacancy;

(b) a defective appointment.

Exercise of functions

9 (1) Subject to sub-paragraphs (2) and (3), the IfA may authorise any of the following to exercise functions on its behalf—

(a) a member of the IfA;

(b) a member of the IfA’s staff;

(c) an IfA committee;

(d) any other person.

(2) The IfA may not authorise any of the functions under sections A2, A2A and A2E to A2I to be exercised on its behalf—

(a) under sub-paragraph (1)(c), by a committee a majority of the members of which are not members of the IfA’s staff, or

(b) under sub-paragraph (1)(d).

(3) The IfA may authorise the exercise on its behalf of functions that have been—

(a) delegated to the IfA by directions under section ZA4, or

(b) conferred on the IfA by regulations under section ZA5,

only if and to the extent that the directions or regulations so provide.

Supplementary powers

10 (1) The IfA may—

(a) provide information or advice to any person in connection with any of the IfA’s functions;

(b) co-operate or work jointly with any person where it is appropriate to do so for the efficient and effective performance of any of the IfA’s functions;

(c) carry out research for the purposes of, or in connection with, the IfA’s functions;

(d) do anything else that the IfA considers necessary or appropriate for the purposes of, or in connection with, its functions.

(2) The power in sub-paragraph (1)(d) is subject to any restrictions imposed by or under any provision of any Act.

(3) The IfA may not borrow money.

(4) The IfA may not, without the consent of the Secretary of State—

(a) lend money,

(b) form, participate in forming or invest in a company, or

(c) form, participate in forming or otherwise become a member of a charitable incorporated organisation (within the meaning of section 69A of the Charities Act 1993).

(5) In sub-paragraph (4) the reference to investing in a company includes a reference to becoming a member of the company and to investing in it by the acquisition of any assets, securities or rights or otherwise.

Accounts and reports

11 (1) The IfA must—

(a) keep proper accounts and proper records in relation to its accounts, and

(b) prepare in respect of each financial year a statement of accounts.

(2) Each statement of accounts must comply with any directions given by the Secretary of State as to—

(a) the information to be contained in it,

(b) the manner in which such information is to be presented, or

(c) the methods and principles according to which the statement is to be prepared.

(3) The IfA must send a copy of each statement of accounts to—

(a) the Secretary of State, and

(b) the Comptroller and Auditor General,

before the end of the month of August following the financial year to which the statement relates.

(4) The Comptroller and Auditor General must—

(a) examine, certify and report on each statement of accounts, and

(b) send a copy of each report and certified statement to the Secretary of State.

(5) The Secretary of State must lay before Parliament—

(a) a copy of each statement sent to the Secretary of State under sub-paragraph (3), and

(b) a copy of each report and certified statement sent to the Secretary of State under sub-paragraph (4).

(6) “Financial year” has the meaning given by section ZA6(6) (annual and other reports).

Application of seal and proof of documents

12 (1) The application of the IfA’s seal must be authenticated by the signature of—

(a) the chief executive, or

(b) a member of the IfA who has been authorised by the IfA for that purpose (whether generally or specifically).

(2) A document purporting to be duly executed under the IfA’s seal, or signed on its behalf—

(a) is to be received in evidence, and

(b) is to be treated as executed or signed in that way, unless the contrary is proved.

Funding

13 (1) The Secretary of State may make grants to the IfA, or provide the IfA with any other kind of financial assistance, subject to any conditions that the Secretary of State considers appropriate.

(2) The conditions may, in particular—

(a) enable the Secretary of State to require full or partial repayment of sums paid by the Secretary of State if any of the conditions are not complied with;

(b) require the payment of interest in respect of any period during which a sum due to the Secretary of State in accordance with any of the conditions remains unpaid.”

10 In Schedule 1 to the Superannuation Act 1972, in the list of “Offices”, at the appropriate place insert—

“Non-executive member of the Institute for Apprenticeships.”

11 In Part 6 of Schedule 1 to the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (public authorities) at the appropriate place insert—

“The Institute for Apprenticeships.”

53: After Schedule 3, insert the following new Schedule—

“SUNDAY OPENING HOURS: RIGHTS OF SHOP WORKERS

Employment Rights Act 1996

1 The Employment Rights Act 1996 is amended as follows.

2 In section 41 (opted-out shop workers and betting workers), for subsection (3) substitute—

“(3) In this Act “notice period”, in relation to an opted-out shop worker or an opted-out betting worker, means—

(a) in the case of an opted-out shop worker who does shop work in or about a large shop, the period of one month beginning with the day on which the opting-out notice concerned was given;

(b) in any other case, the period of three months beginning with that day.

This subsection is subject to sections 41D(2) and 42(2).”

3 After section 41 insert—

“41A Notice of objection by shop workers to working additional hours on Sunday

(1) A shop worker may at any time give to his or her employer a written notice, signed and dated by the shop worker, to the effect that he or she objects to doing shop work for additional hours on Sunday.

(2) In this Part—

“additional hours” means any number of hours of shop work that a shop worker is (or could be) required to work under a contract of employment on Sunday that are (or would be) in excess of the shop worker’s normal Sunday working hours;

“objection notice” means a notice given under subsection (1).

(3) The “normal Sunday working hours” of a shop worker are to be calculated in accordance with regulations.

(4) Regulations under this section may provide—

(a) for the calculation to be determined (for example) by reference to the average number of hours that the shop worker has worked on Sundays during a period specified or described in the regulations;

(b) for a calculation of the kind mentioned in paragraph (a) to be varied in special cases;

(c) for the right to give an objection notice not to be exercisable in special cases (and subsection (1) is subject to provision made by virtue of this paragraph).

(5) Provision under subsection (4)(b) or (c) may, in particular, include provision—

(a) about how the calculation of normal Sunday working hours is to be made in the case of a shop worker who has not been employed for a sufficient period of time to enable a calculation to be made as otherwise provided for in the regulations;

(b) for the right to give an objection notice not to be exercisable by such a shop worker until he or she has completed a period of employment specified or described in the regulations.

(6) But regulations under this section may not include provision preventing a shop worker who has been continuously employed under a contract of employment for a period of one year or more from giving to the employer an objection notice.

(7) Regulations under this section may make different provision for different purposes.

41B Explanatory statement: persons who become shop workers

(1) This section applies where a person becomes a shop worker who, under a contract of employment, is or may be required to do shop work on Sundays.

(2) The employer must give to the shop worker a written statement informing the shop worker of the following rights—

(a) the right to object to working on Sundays by giving the employer an opting-out notice (if section 40 applies to the shop worker);

(b) the right to object to doing shop work for additional hours on Sundays by giving the employer an objection notice.

(3) The statement must be given before the end of the period of two months beginning with the day on which the person becomes a shop worker as mentioned in subsection (1).

(4) An employer does not fail to comply with subsections (2) and (3) in a case where, before the end of the period referred to in subsection (3), the shop worker has given to the employer an opting-out notice (and that notice has not been withdrawn).

(5) A statement under this section must comply with such requirements as to form and content as regulations may provide.

(6) Regulations under this section may make different provision for different purposes.

41C Explanatory statement: shop workers at commencement date

(1) This section applies where—

(a) under a contract of employment a shop worker is or may be required to do shop work on Sundays, and

(b) the shop worker was employed under that contract on the day before the commencement date.

(2) The shop worker’s employer must give to the shop worker a written statement informing the shop worker of the rights mentioned in section 41B(2).

(3) The statement must be given before the end of the period of two months beginning with the commencement date.

(4) An employer does not fail to comply with subsections (2) and (3) in a case where, before the end of the period referred to in subsection (3), the shop worker has given to the employer an opting-out notice (and that notice has not been withdrawn).

(5) A statement under this section must comply with such requirements as to form and content as regulations may provide.

(6) Regulations under this section may make different provision for different purposes.

(7) In this section “commencement date” means the date appointed by regulations under section 38 of the Enterprise Act 2016 for the coming into force of section (Sunday working) of, and Schedule (Sunday opening hours: rights of shop workers) to, that Act.

41D Failure to give explanatory statement under section 41B or 41C

(1) This section applies if an employer fails to give to a shop worker a written statement in accordance with—

(a) section 41B(2) and (3), or

(b) section 41C(2) and (3).

(2) If the shop worker gives to the employer an opting-out notice, the notice period under section 41(3) that applies in relation to the shop worker is varied as follows—

(a) if the notice period under that provision would have been one month, it becomes 7 days instead;

(b) if the notice period under that provision would have been three months, it becomes one month instead.

(3) If the shop worker gives to the employer an objection notice, the relevant period under section 43ZA(2) that applies in relation to the shop worker is varied as follows—

(a) if the relevant period under that provision would have been one month, it becomes 7 days instead;

(b) if the relevant period under that provision would have been three months, it becomes one month instead.”

4 (1) Section 42 (explanatory statement) is amended as follows.

(2) In the heading, after “statement” insert “: betting workers”.

(3) In subsection (1) omit “shop worker or”.

(4) In subsection (2)—

(a) in paragraph (a) omit “shop worker or”;

(b) in paragraph (b)—

(i) after “the” omit “shop worker or”;

(ii) omit “an opted-out shop worker or”;

(c) in the words after paragraph (b), omit “shop worker or.”

(5) In subsection (3) omit “shop worker or”.

(6) Omit subsection (4).

(7) In subsection (6)—

(a) for “forms” substitute “form”;

(b) for “subsections (4) and (5)” substitute “subsection (5)”.

5 In the heading of section 43, after “work” insert “: opting-out notices”.

6 After section 43 (in Part 4) insert—

“43ZA Contractual requirements relating to working additional hours on Sundays: objection notices

(1) Where a shop worker gives to his or her employer an objection notice, any agreement entered into between the shop worker and the employer becomes unenforceable to the extent that—

(a) it requires the shop worker to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday after the end of the relevant period, or

(b) it requires the employer to provide the shop worker with shop work for additional hours on Sunday after the end of that period.

(2) The “relevant period” is—

(a) in the case of a shop worker who is or may be required to do shop work in or about a large shop, the period of one month beginning with the day on which the objection notice is given;

(b) in any other case, the period of three months beginning with that day.

This subsection is subject to section 41D(3).

(3) A shop worker who has given an objection notice may revoke the notice by giving a further written notice to the employer.

(4) Where—

(a) a shop worker gives to the employer a notice under subsection (3), and

(b) after giving the notice the shop worker expressly agrees with the employer to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday (whether on Sundays generally or on a particular Sunday),

the contract of employment between the shop worker and the employer is to be taken to be varied to the extent necessary to give effect to the terms of the agreement.

(5) The reference in subsection (1) to any agreement—

(a) includes the contract of employment under which the shop worker is employed immediately before giving the objection notice;

(b) includes an agreement of a kind mentioned in subsection (4), or a contract of employment as taken to be varied under that subsection, only if an objection notice is given in relation to the working of additional hours under that agreement or contract as varied.

43ZB Interpretation

(1) In this Part—

“additional hours” has the meaning given in section 41A(2);

“large shop” means a shop which has a relevant floor area exceeding 280 square metres;

“objection notice” has the meaning given in section 41A(2);

“regulations” means regulations made by the Secretary of State.

(2) In the definition of “large shop” in subsection (1)—

(a) “shop” means any premises where there is carried on a trade or business consisting wholly or mainly of the sale of goods;

(b) “relevant floor area” means the internal floor area of so much of the large shop in question as consists of or is comprised in a building.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (2), any part of the shop which is not used for the serving of customers in connection with the sale or display of goods is to be disregarded.

(4) The references in subsections (2) and (3) to the sale of goods does not include—

(a) the sale of meals, refreshments or alcohol (within the meaning of the Licensing Act 2003 or, in relation to Scotland, the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 16)) for consumption on the premises on which they are sold, or

(b) the sale of meals or refreshments prepared to order for immediate consumption off those premises.”

7 After section 45 insert—

“45ZA Sunday working for shop workers: additional hours

(1) Subsection (2) applies where a shop worker has given an objection notice to his or her employer and the notice has not been withdrawn.

(2) The shop worker has the right not to be subjected to any detriment by any act, or any deliberate failure to act, by the employer done on the ground that the shop worker refused (or proposed to refuse) to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday or on a particular Sunday.

(3) Subsection (2) does not apply to anything done on the ground that the shop worker refused (or proposed to refuse) to do shop work for additional hours on any Sunday or Sundays falling before the end of the relevant period.

(4) A shop worker has the right not to be subjected to any detriment by any act, or any deliberate failure to act, by his or her employer on the ground that the shop worker gave (or proposed to give) an objection notice to the employer.

(5) Subsections (2) and (4) do not apply where the detriment in question amounts to dismissal (within the meaning of Part 10).

(6) For the purposes of this section, a shop worker who does not do shop work for additional hours on Sunday or on a particular Sunday is not to be regarded as having been subjected to any detriment by—

(a) a failure to pay remuneration in respect of doing shop work for additional hours on Sunday which the shop worker has not done, or

(b) a failure to provide any other benefit where the failure results from the application (in relation to a Sunday on which the shop worker has not done shop work for additional hours) of a contractual term under which the extent of the benefit varies according to the number of hours worked by, or the remuneration paid to, the shop worker.

(7) Subsections (8) and (9) apply where—

(a) an employer offers to pay a sum specified in the offer to a shop worker if he or she agrees to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday or on a particular Sunday, and

(b) the shop worker—

(i) has given an objection notice to the employer that has not been withdrawn, or

(ii) is not obliged under a contract of employment to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday.

(8) A shop worker to whom the offer is not made is not to be regarded for the purposes of this section as having been subjected to any detriment by any failure—

(a) to make the offer to the shop worker, or

(b) to pay the shop worker the sum specified in the offer.

(9) A shop worker who does not accept the offer is not to be regarded for the purposes of this section as having been subjected to any detriment by any failure to pay the shop worker the sum specified in the offer.

(10) In this section—

“additional hours” and “objection notice” have the meanings given by section 41A(2);

“relevant period” means the period determined by section 43ZA(2) (but subject to section 41D(3)).”

8 In section 48 (complaints to employment tribunals), after subsection (1) insert—

“(1YA) A shop worker may present a complaint to an employment tribunal that he or she has been subjected to a detriment in contravention of section 45ZA.”

9 After section 101 insert—

“101ZA Shop workers who refuse to work additional hours on Sunday

(1) Subsection (2) applies where a shop worker has given an objection notice that has not been withdrawn and he or she is dismissed.

(2) The shop worker is to be regarded for the purposes of this Part as unfairly dismissed if the reason (or the principal reason) for the dismissal is that he or she refused, or proposed to refuse, to do shop work for additional hours on Sunday or on a particular Sunday.

(3) Subsection (2) does not apply where the reason (or principal reason) for the dismissal is that the shop worker refused (or proposed to refuse) to do shop work for additional hours on any Sunday or Sundays falling before the end of the relevant period.

(4) A shop worker who is dismissed is to be regarded for the purposes of this Part as unfairly dismissed if the reason (or principal reason) for the dismissal is that the worker gave (or proposed to give) an objection notice to the employer.

(5) In this section—

“additional hours” and “objection notice” have the meanings given by section 41A(2);

“relevant period” means the period determined by section 43ZA(2) (but subject to section 41D(3)).”

10 In section 108 (qualifying period of employment), in subsection (3) after paragraph (d) insert—

“(da) subsection (2) of section 101ZA applies (read with subsection (3) of that section) or subsection (4) of that section applies,”.

11 In section 236 (orders and regulations), in subsection (3) after “27B,” insert “41A that include provision under subsection (4)(c) of that section,”.

Employment Act 2002

12 In section 38 of the Employment Act 2002 (failure to give statement of employment particulars etc)—

(a) in subsection (2)(b), after “change)” insert “or under section 41B or 41C of that Act (duty to give a written statement in relation to rights not to work on Sunday)”;

(b) in subsection (3)(b), after “1996” insert “or under section 41B or 41C of that Act”.”

54: In the Title, line 1, at end insert “provision about Sunday working;”

Motion on Amendments 40 to 54 agreed.