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Afghanistan: Armed Forces

Volume 499: debated on Wednesday 11 November 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which units down to company level have been deployed to Afghanistan (a) once, (b) twice, (c) three and (d) four or more times since October 2001. (297938)

The following table shows which units at Company level have deployed once, twice, three and four times to Afghanistan since October 2001.

Regular unit name

Number of battalion deployments

Number of 3 Coy deployments

Number of 2 Coy deployments

Number of 1 Coy deployments

40 Commando Royal Marines

1

42 Commando Royal Marines

2

45 Commando Royal Marines

3

1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards

3

1st Battalion, The Coldstream Guards

1

1st Battalion, The Welsh Guards

1

1st Battalion, The Royal Scots Borderers, The Royal Regiment of Scotland

1

The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

1

The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

1

The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland

1

The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment

3

2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

1

2

1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment

1

1

2nd Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment

1

2nd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment (formerly Green Howards)

3

2nd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters)

3

1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh (Royal Welch Fusiliers)

2

2

2nd Battalion, The Royal Welsh

2

1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment

1

2nd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

1

3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment

2

1st Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles

1

2nd Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles

2

1

1st Battalion, The Rifles, (formerly known as The Royal Gloucestershire Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry)

2

2nd Battalion, The Rifles

1

3rd Battalion, The Rifles

1

4th Battalion, The Rifles

1

1

The apparent unevenness in the distribution of deployments between the various units shown reflect the narrow parameters of the question. Over the period that the answer covers, the Army have been committed on operations in not only Afghanistan and Iraq, but also have deployed in the Balkans, Northern Ireland, Cyprus and the Falkland Islands. When determining which units to allocate to operations, a number of considerations apply, not least the particular capability they offer. For example, those units which have deployed to Afghanistan will predominantly be those that operate in a light role.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many UK soldiers have (a) died and (b) suffered injury that has required aeromedivac to the UK, due to improvised explosive devices detonated in the course of logistical moves in Helmand Province since 2005. (298421)

[holding answer 10 November 2009]: The MOD is committed to openly publishing casualty statistics on the number of service personnel killed and wounded on operations. Information on casualties sustained since January 2006 in Afghanistan and information on how each individual was killed is included in their eulogies available on our website at the following link.

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/FactSheets/OperationsFactsheets

I will place a copy of the most up to date statistics in the Library of the House. These statistics are updated fortnightly online. We do not disclose information on how casualties are injured as its disclosure would, or would be likely to prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces.

Information on patients from Afghanistan who require treatment at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine at Selly Oak Hospital and the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre at Headley Court is also publicly available on the website of the Defence Analytical Services and Advice.

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=48&pubType=0&thiscontent=1350&Publish Time=09:30:00&date=2009-10-30&disText=30%20September %202009&from=listing&topDate=2009-10-30&skipCheck=l

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many limbs have been lost by UK troops in Helmand Province since 2005. (298422)

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Castle Point (Bob Spink) on 2 November 2009, Official Report, column 644W. Determining amputations related to action specifically in Helmand would be complex and would at the very least necessitate interrogation of individual records. Even this would not be definitive as wounded could arrive at any one of many field hospitals, potentially including those outside Helmand. At the same time, casualties evacuated from Helmand field hospitals could have been wounded elsewhere. Consequently, obtaining verified data would be problematic and any data provided could not be relied upon.