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Computer Misuse Act 1990

Volume 499: debated on Wednesday 11 November 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many warrants were issued under section 14 of the Computer Misuse Act 1990 in the last four years. (298074)

I have been asked to reply.

Information showing the number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts, and found guilty at all courts for offences under sections 1, 2, 3 and 3 A of the Computer Misuse Act 1990 in England and Wales from 2004 to 2007 (latest available) is shown in the following table. From the information available on the Ministry of Justice court proceedings database it is not possible to identify if any of the proceedings and convictions resulted from a warrant issued under section 14 of the Computer Misuse Act 1990.

Data for 2008 are planned for publication on 28 January 2010.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Computer Misuse Act 1990, England and Wales, 2004-071, 2

2004

2005

2006

2007

Offence

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Unauthorised access to computer material. Section 1

5

3

5

4

7

4

8

3

Unauthorised access with intent to commit or facilitate commission of further offences. Section 2

6

2

11

7

5

4

2

—

Unauthorised modification of computer material. Sections 3 and 3A.

10

7

8

5

13

10

9

7

Total

21

12

24

16

25

18

19

10

1 The statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

2 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.