Skip to main content

Multiple Sclerosis: Drugs

Volume 501: debated on Wednesday 25 November 2009

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of the effects of the risk-sharing scheme for the provision of multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs on the availability of other drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, including drugs approved by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence; (300341)

(2) when he expects the risk-sharing scheme will be able to demonstrate the value for money of multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs;

(3) what the cost has been of the risk-sharing scheme for disease-modifying drugs since its inception.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of progress on the risk-sharing scheme for provision of multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs; (301571)

(2) what his most recent estimate is of the cost to date of the risk-sharing scheme for the provision of multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs; and what estimate he has made of the total cost of the scheme over its projected lifespan;

(3) what recent assessment he has made of the operation of the risk-sharing scheme for the provision of multiple sclerosis disease-modifying drugs.

While we have made no formal assessment, we consider that it is unlikely the scheme has made any significant impact on the availability of other drugs used to treat multiple sclerosis. The drugs included in the scheme are used within criteria developed by the Association of British Neurologists. The national health service is obliged to fund other drugs approved by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) within the terms of the appraisal guidance. Natalizumab (Tysabri) is the only other licensed medicine which has an impact on the course of the disease and has been recommended by NICE for use in the NHS.

Data from the first two years of follow-up of the monitoring cohort of the Multiple Sclerosis Risk Sharing Scheme have been collected and these data have been analysed and interpreted by an independent advisory group. A paper outlining the results is to be published shortly on the British Medical Journal’s website

www.bmj.com

We estimate that the costs incurred since the scheme's inception are in the order of £350 million. This figure is made up of £200,000 a year representing the Department’s 20 per cent. share of running the contract; an average £35,000 a year to meet the MS Trust’s administration costs for the scheme and drug costs of around £50 million a year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many packs of the drug Natalizumab, brand name Tysabri, have been issued in each strategic health authority area in each of the last two years. (300344)

This drug was not dispensed in the community in 2007 or 2008 but has been used in hospitals. The rate of use by strategic health authority (SHA) is:

Number of packs for Tysabri1 used by each SHA in England

Thousand

SHA

2007

2008

North East

0.0

0.4

North West

0.0

0.4

Yorkshire and the Humber

0.3

East Midlands

0.0

0.1

West Midlands

0.0

0.2

East of England

0.0

0.2

London

0.1

1.0

South East Coast

0.0

South Central

0.1

South West

0.0

0.3

Total

0.2

3.0

1 A pack is a 15 millilitre vial.

Notes:

1. Where less than 50 packs have been used, the figure has been suppressed to ‘0.0’.

2. ‘—’ Indicates no use of the drug.

3. Totals may not add due to rounding.

4. IMSHealth do not collect data from all hospitals and there is less than 100 per cent. coverage in some SHAs.

Source:

© IMS HEALTH: Hospital Pharmacy Audit