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Prostate Cancer

Volume 476: debated on Monday 2 June 2008

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what the standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England and (b) each primary care trust (PCT) area in each year since 1997; and how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (i) England and (ii) each PCT area in each of those years. (206402)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 2 June 2008:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what the age standardised mortality rate from prostate cancer was in (a) England and (b) each primary care trust (PCT) area each year since 1997; and how many deaths from prostate cancer there were in (i) England and (ii) each PCT area in each of those years. (206402)

A copy of the tables containing the relevant information have been placed in the House of Commons Library. The tables provide the number of deaths where prostate cancer was the underlying cause of death in (a) England and (b) primary care organisations (table 1), for 1997 to 2006 and age standardised mortality rates for (i) England and (ii) primary care organisations (table 2), for 2002 to 2006 (the latest year available).

The current primary care organisation boundaries were introduced in October 2006, and population estimates using these boundaries are available for 2002 to 2006. It is therefore not possible to calculate mortality rates for primary care organisations before 2002.

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what the age-standardised incidence of prostate cancer was in (a) spearhead primary care trusts and (b) England in the latest period for which figures are available. (206401)

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated May 2008:

As National Statistician I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the age standardised incidence of prostate cancer was in (a) spearhead primary care trusts and (b) England in the latest period for which figures are available. [206401]

The spearhead group is defined in terms of local authorities. Spearhead primary care organisations (PCOs) are those which overlap geographically with any of the area defined by the spearhead local authorities. For most, the whole of the PCO area overlaps with the spearhead local authorities, but some only partially overlap.

The attached table presents age standardised incidence rates and the number of registrations of prostate cancer in England and in the spearhead group. Figures are also presented for each PCO overlapping with the spearhead group. All figures are for 2005, the latest year available. An estimate of the percentage of the PCO population in the spearhead group in 2002 is also shown.

Table 1. Age-standardised incidence rates of prostate cancer per 100,000 population1, 2, 3 England, Spearhead group and primary care organisations, 20054

Area

Incidence rate

95% confidence interval

Number of registrations

Percentage of PCO population within the spearhead group5

England

95.6

(94.5 - 96.7)

28,887

Spearhead group

96.2

(94.3 - 98.2)

9,806

Barking and Dagenham

83

(63 - 104)

63

100

Greenwich Teaching

83

(65 - 101)

81

100

Hammersmith and Fulham

110

(85 - 135)

75

100

Haringey Teaching

126

(101 - 151)

98

100

Islington

98

(75 - 122)

67

100

Lambeth

124

(101 - 148)

109

100

Lewisham

78

(61 - 96)

75

100

Newham

63

(46 - 80)

53

100

Southwark

85

(67 - 104)

80

100

Tower Hamlets

60

(42 - 78)

41

100

Bolton

95

(79 - 110)

142

100

Bury

127

(106 - 148)

136

100

Manchester

106

(91 - 120)

205

100

Oldham

144

(122 - 166)

171

100

Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale

116

(96 - 136)

130

100

Salford

103

(85 - 122)

126

100

Ashton, Leigh and Wigan

117

(101 - 133)

209

100

Knowsley

96

(74 - 118)

74

100

Liverpool

93

(81 - 105)

221

100

Halton and St. Helens

83

(70 - 97)

143

100

Wirral

79

(67 - 91)

166

100

Barnsley

86

(71 - 102)

120

100

Doncaster

62

(51 - 73)

113

100

Rotherham

51

(40 - 63)

79

100

Gateshead

126

(105 - 146)

148

100

Newcastle

57

(45 - 69)

91

100

North Tyneside

87

(70 - 103)

106

100

South Tyneside

68

(52 - 85)

64

100

Sunderland Teaching

92

(78 - 107)

156

100

South Birmingham

122

(106 - 138)

220

100

Coventry Teaching

114

(98 - 130)

194

100

Sandwell

78

(65 - 91)

132

100

Walsall Teaching

121

(104 - 138)

193

100

Wolverhampton City

118

(100 - 135)

174

100

Bradford and Airedale

85

(74 - 97)

212

100

Wakefield District

96

(82 - 110)

186

100

Hartlepool

68

(46 - 91)

36

100

Middlesbrough

135

(109 - 161)

103

100

Redcar and Cleveland

104

(84 - 125)

97

100

North Tees

74

(58 - 90)

79

100

Warrington

57

(43 - 71)

61

100

Blackburn with Darwen

84

(63 - 106)

59

100

Blackpool

86

(68 - 104)

90

100

Hull

86

(70 - 102)

116

100

Leicester City

69

(55 - 83)

95

100

Nottingham City

74

(59 - 88)

98

100

Heart of Birmingham Teaching

106

(86 - 125)

112

100

Birmingham East and North

107

(94 - 121)

233

100

North East Lincolnshire

89

(70 - 107)

89

100

Stoke on Trent

68

(55 - 81)

104

97

City and Hackney Teaching

98

(76 - 120)

74

96

Tameside and Glossop

105

(88 - 122)

146

87

East Lancashire

103

(89 - 116)

232

86

County Durham

77

(67 - 86)

247

77

Northumberland

106

(92 - 120)

229

46

Cumbria

83

(74 - 93)

299

35

Central Lancashire

143

(129 - 157)

379

29

Warwickshire

90

(80 - 100)

308

23

Lincolnshire

118

(108 - 127)

612

13

South Staffordshire

104

(93 - 114)

393

13

Derbyshire County

88

(80 - 97)

430

10

Northamptonshire

114

(103 - 125)

432

8

1 Age standardised incidence rates per 100,000 population, standardised to the European Standard Population. Age standardised rates are used to allow comparison between populations which may contain different proportions of people of different ages.

2 Confidence intervals are a measure of the statistical precision of an estimate and show the range of uncertainty around the estimated figure. Calculations based on small numbers of events are often subject to random fluctuations. As a general rule, if the confidence intervals around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.

3 Prostate cancer incidence was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD- 10) codeC61.

4 Based on boundaries as of 2008.

5 Percentages based on PCO population as at 2002.