Skip to main content

Genetics: Databases

Volume 479: debated on Monday 1 September 2008

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many DNA samples on the DNA database are from children currently under the age of 18 years who have not been charged or cautioned with an offence. (198643)

Data on young persons aged under 18 were obtained from the National DNA Database (NDNAD) and the Police National Computer (PNC) on 9-10 April 2008. The NDNAD data indicate that, on 10 April 2008, there were 349,934 subject sample profiles relating to persons aged 10 to 17 on it. There are more profiles than individuals due to DNA samples being taken from some individuals on more than one occasion, that is, there is some duplicate sampling. It is estimated that the current rate of profile replication is about 13.3 per cent. Taking the replication rate into account, it is estimated that the 349,934 profiles are equivalent to 303,393 persons aged 10 to 17.

Data obtained from the PNC on 9-10 April indicate that, of those estimated 303,393 persons, 264,297 (87.1 per cent.) had a conviction, caution, reprimand or had received a final warning and 39,095 (12.8 per cent.) had not been convicted, cautioned, received a final warning/reprimand and had no charge pending against them.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals in each police force area have records on the national DNA database. (200243)

The information requested is given in the table. The figures show the number of subject sample profiles retained on the National DNA Database (NDNAD) at 31 March 2008, which were taken by police forces in England and Wales. The number of subject profiles is not the same as the number of individuals. It is currently estimated that 13.3 per cent. of profiles held on the NDNAD are replicates, that is, that a profile for a person has been loaded on more than one occasion. The replication rate of 13.3 per cent. should, however, be applied only over the entire NDNAD, as the replication rate for individual police forces varies considerably. The table gives the number of subject profiles for each police force only, but gives a total estimated number of individuals for all English and Welsh police forces.

Force

Subject profiles

Avon and Somerset

101,352

Bedfordshire

45,460

British Transport

45,455

Cambridgeshire

53,796

Cheshire

79,569

City of London Police

23,013

Cleveland

51,618

Cumbria

44,632

Derbyshire

87,379

Devon and Cornwall

109,393

Dorset

49,817

Durham

52,359

Dyfed-Powys

49,410

Essex

124,403

Gloucestershire

44,061

Greater Manchester Police

244,975

Gwent

51,730

Hampshire

145,141

Hertfordshire

73,823

Humberside

82,241

Kent

140,840

Lancashire

141,859

Leicestershire

66,912

Lincolnshire

47,643

Merseyside

129,261

Metropolitan Police

810,134

Norfolk

65,261

North Wales

58,506

North Yorkshire

56,198

Northamptonshire

43,929

Northumbria

166,358

Nottinghamshire

97,853

South Wales Constabulary

116,821

South Yorkshire

117,769

Staffordshire

96,357

Suffolk

46,838

Surrey

60,274

Sussex

112,083

Thames Valley

147,630

Warwickshire

31,989

West Mercia

76,227

West Midlands

292,873

West Yorkshire

215,675

Wiltshire

49,310

Total

4,748,227

Estimated number of individuals

4,126,642

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost of maintaining the national DNA database has been in each year since its inception; and what it is estimated to be in 2008-09. (202013)

The National DNA Database (NDNAD) was established in 1995, when responsibility for the operational management of the NDNAD rested with the Forensic Science Service (FSS) on behalf of the Police Service. No central records of costs relating to the maintenance of the NDNAD are held prior to 2002, as cost data were incorporated in other costs incurred by the FSS.

In December 2005, the FSS was vested as a Government owned company and the NDNAD transferred from the FSS to the Home Office. On 1 April 2007, the NDNAD transferred from the Home Office to the National Policing Improvement Agency.

The costs relating to the maintenance of the NDNAD from 2002-08 and the estimated cost for 2008-09 are given in the following tables. The costs from 2006-07 are higher than for previous years, because of the complete separation of costs from the FSS, and because the increase in the number of forensic suppliers requires additional resources for accreditation and continuous monitoring.

Table 1

£

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

NDNAD Services costs

774,304

904,385

1,276,823

l,245,151

Supplier Accreditation costs

320,507

388,047

433,828

459,192

Total

l,094,811

l,292,432

1,710,651

1,704,343

Table 2

£

2006-07

2007-08

2008-091

NDNAD Service delivery including delivery of IT Development projects

2,041,743

1,600,087

1,770,000

Custodian Accreditation

527,677

574,817

750,000

Total

2,569,420

2,174,904

2,520,000

1 Estimate.